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Do you need a multi vitamin?

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  • CSARdiverCSARdiver Posts: 6,169Member Member Posts: 6,169Member Member
    A multivitamin is a supplement, which by very definition means that it cannot prove effectivity.

    ...and yet the supplement industry boasts revenue in the billions.
  • weatherwoman94weatherwoman94 Posts: 14Member Member Posts: 14Member Member
    They're expensive. I've just started taking one for immune system and lung health.
  • mbaker566mbaker566 Posts: 10,059Member Member Posts: 10,059Member Member
    my doctor described it as really expensive pee.
  • ceiswynceiswyn Posts: 2,134Member Member Posts: 2,134Member Member
    I probably don't 'need' a multivitamin. But as I'm a vegetarian, I take a multivitamin-with-iron a couple of times a week just to cover all the bases. I'd rather not discover that I'm B12 deficient or anaemic the painful way.
  • magnusthenerdmagnusthenerd Posts: 844Member Member Posts: 844Member Member
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    A multivitamin is a supplement, which by very definition means that it cannot prove effectivity.

    ...and yet the supplement industry boasts revenue in the billions.

    What definition of supplement is that? There absolutely are some supplements that have been demonstrably effective at certain things.
    If you're loosely referring to how supplements in the US are held to different regulatory standards about claims than prescription drugs, you're still off as there are prescription standardized vitamins that can treat or aid specific conditions.
  • magnusthenerdmagnusthenerd Posts: 844Member Member Posts: 844Member Member
    Oddly enough, the epidemiology research actually tends to show that people taking multivitamins are at increased risk for death. Though admittedly, that is probably not from the vitamins themselves causing a harm but because the people taking them are probably more likely to be people with health conditions that can't eliminated by statistic corrections to the epidemiology.
  • ExistingFishExistingFish Posts: 896Member Member Posts: 896Member Member
    I take fish oil because I don't eat fish almost at all. If you regularly ate healthy, fatty fish, you would not need it.

    I take magnesium because it is the second most common vitamin deficiency in the developed world, and yes because our soils are depleted. It's incredibly difficult to test in blood serum, so your doctor cannot test you for it effectively. It makes a measurable effect on my mental health.

    I take a multivitamin to cover my bases because some days I eat a fantastically varied diet with lots of fruit and veg, and some days I have a bagel for breakfast and pizza for dinner with a peanut butter sandwich for lunch or something like that. I feel like 70% of my days are good days, and far too many are not, so I take a multi.

    The more I look into it, the more I think I probably need to supplement more. I'm going to further look into my mineral consumption because I need to remineralize my teeth...that magnesium helps with that too apparently.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 538Member Member Posts: 538Member Member
    MikePTY wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    Multi vitamins have been extensively studied and there is no evidence they improve overall health outcomes like getting vitamins naturally from your food does. As far as "vitamin fortified food", I am not sure that has been studied enough as to whether or not they provide any benefit.

    I think if you are trying to focus on health, I would skip the multivitamin, only used fortified foods as a last resort, and try as much as you can to get them from foods where they occur naturally.

    In the U.S. you would have to pretty much skip any commercial baked goods, breakfast cereals, standard milk, and I don't know what else to avoid "vitamin fortified food."

    I am not saying you need to avoid them. What I mean is that I wouldn't necessarily rely on them as a source of vitamin and minerals, vs getting them from foods where they are naturally occurring.

    Unfortunately in US only 1 of 10 adults get the recommended servings of fruits and veggies (which are a significant source of vitamins). A daily supplement might not be bad for most people.

    https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/p1116-fruit-vegetable-consumption.html
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 3,489Member Member Posts: 3,489Member Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    Multi vitamins have been extensively studied and there is no evidence they improve overall health outcomes like getting vitamins naturally from your food does. As far as "vitamin fortified food", I am not sure that has been studied enough as to whether or not they provide any benefit.

    I think if you are trying to focus on health, I would skip the multivitamin, only used fortified foods as a last resort, and try as much as you can to get them from foods where they occur naturally.

    In the U.S. you would have to pretty much skip any commercial baked goods, breakfast cereals, standard milk, and I don't know what else to avoid "vitamin fortified food."

    I am not saying you need to avoid them. What I mean is that I wouldn't necessarily rely on them as a source of vitamin and minerals, vs getting them from foods where they are naturally occurring.

    Unfortunately in US only 1 of 10 adults get the recommended servings of fruits and veggies (which are a significant source of vitamins). A daily supplement might not be bad for most people.

    https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/p1116-fruit-vegetable-consumption.html

    Or they could just eat more veg and fruit.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 538Member Member Posts: 538Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    Multi vitamins have been extensively studied and there is no evidence they improve overall health outcomes like getting vitamins naturally from your food does. As far as "vitamin fortified food", I am not sure that has been studied enough as to whether or not they provide any benefit.

    I think if you are trying to focus on health, I would skip the multivitamin, only used fortified foods as a last resort, and try as much as you can to get them from foods where they occur naturally.

    In the U.S. you would have to pretty much skip any commercial baked goods, breakfast cereals, standard milk, and I don't know what else to avoid "vitamin fortified food."

    I am not saying you need to avoid them. What I mean is that I wouldn't necessarily rely on them as a source of vitamin and minerals, vs getting them from foods where they are naturally occurring.

    Unfortunately in US only 1 of 10 adults get the recommended servings of fruits and veggies (which are a significant source of vitamins). A daily supplement might not be bad for most people.

    https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/p1116-fruit-vegetable-consumption.html

    Or they could just eat more veg and fruit.

    Very true but do you see it happening in the short term?
  • NovusDiesNovusDies Posts: 5,755Member, Premium Member Posts: 5,755Member, Premium Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    Multi vitamins have been extensively studied and there is no evidence they improve overall health outcomes like getting vitamins naturally from your food does. As far as "vitamin fortified food", I am not sure that has been studied enough as to whether or not they provide any benefit.

    I think if you are trying to focus on health, I would skip the multivitamin, only used fortified foods as a last resort, and try as much as you can to get them from foods where they occur naturally.

    In the U.S. you would have to pretty much skip any commercial baked goods, breakfast cereals, standard milk, and I don't know what else to avoid "vitamin fortified food."

    I am not saying you need to avoid them. What I mean is that I wouldn't necessarily rely on them as a source of vitamin and minerals, vs getting them from foods where they are naturally occurring.

    Unfortunately in US only 1 of 10 adults get the recommended servings of fruits and veggies (which are a significant source of vitamins). A daily supplement might not be bad for most people.

    https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/p1116-fruit-vegetable-consumption.html

    Failing to get the recommended servings of fruits and vegetables does not immediately mean someone is deficient or that they need a multi.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Posts: 12,462Member Member Posts: 12,462Member Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    Multi vitamins have been extensively studied and there is no evidence they improve overall health outcomes like getting vitamins naturally from your food does. As far as "vitamin fortified food", I am not sure that has been studied enough as to whether or not they provide any benefit.

    I think if you are trying to focus on health, I would skip the multivitamin, only used fortified foods as a last resort, and try as much as you can to get them from foods where they occur naturally.

    In the U.S. you would have to pretty much skip any commercial baked goods, breakfast cereals, standard milk, and I don't know what else to avoid "vitamin fortified food."

    I am not saying you need to avoid them. What I mean is that I wouldn't necessarily rely on them as a source of vitamin and minerals, vs getting them from foods where they are naturally occurring.

    Unfortunately in US only 1 of 10 adults get the recommended servings of fruits and veggies (which are a significant source of vitamins). A daily supplement might not be bad for most people.

    https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/p1116-fruit-vegetable-consumption.html

    Failing to get the recommended servings of fruits and vegetables does not immediately mean someone is deficient or that they need a multi.

    Doubtless those rabble-rousing extremist radicals over at the USDA/CDC just recommend them for no reason. :lol:
    edited September 9
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 3,489Member Member Posts: 3,489Member Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    Multi vitamins have been extensively studied and there is no evidence they improve overall health outcomes like getting vitamins naturally from your food does. As far as "vitamin fortified food", I am not sure that has been studied enough as to whether or not they provide any benefit.

    I think if you are trying to focus on health, I would skip the multivitamin, only used fortified foods as a last resort, and try as much as you can to get them from foods where they occur naturally.

    In the U.S. you would have to pretty much skip any commercial baked goods, breakfast cereals, standard milk, and I don't know what else to avoid "vitamin fortified food."

    I am not saying you need to avoid them. What I mean is that I wouldn't necessarily rely on them as a source of vitamin and minerals, vs getting them from foods where they are naturally occurring.

    Unfortunately in US only 1 of 10 adults get the recommended servings of fruits and veggies (which are a significant source of vitamins). A daily supplement might not be bad for most people.

    https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/p1116-fruit-vegetable-consumption.html

    Or they could just eat more veg and fruit.

    Very true but do you see it happening in the short term?

    For some. It's easy enough, especially if one is contemplating adding a supplement.

    IMO, veg and fruit is a better choice and easy, but whatever.
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Posts: 5,165Member Member Posts: 5,165Member Member
    I think taking a multivitamin is uneccesary for most people.

    Uneccesary but harmless - so if you want to, no harm in doing so - they are relatively cheap and if you feel your diet has room for improvement, they may help fill any gaps.

    But nature leaves wide margins so anyone eating a half decent diet will usually not have a vitamin deficiency.

    However If I had a specific need, I would take that specific supplement.
    In my case iron ,because I tend to border line anemia.
    People at risk of osteoporosis might be recomended to take Calcium/Vitamin D, women trying to concieve are recomended to take folic acid etc. (in Australia breads and cereals are fortified with it too)
    But they are specific supplements for specific reasons.

  • LivhereLivhere Posts: 147Member Member Posts: 147Member Member
    Cyclist84 wrote: »
    Usually you hear it’s to fill in a gap since our soil is depleted. But what about cereals and bars breads and drinks that already have added vitamins? The story is we don’t eat enough fresh veggies and so on and so forth but of our processed food has the added vitamins in them then wouldn’t taking an extra pill be too much?

    I have an autoimmune disease so I have to take a multi-vitamin daily. I usually show up with a deficiency in my blood work, so this just helps ensure I get my daily vitamins in that I can't get on my own.
    edited September 9
  • samhenningssamhennings Posts: 443Member Member Posts: 443Member Member
    I think taking a multivitamin is uneccesary for most people.

    Uneccesary but harmless - so if you want to, no harm in doing so - they are relatively cheap and if you feel your diet has room for improvement, they may help fill any gaps.

    Pretty much my take. Im well aware a lot of the vitamin dose is lost via urin, and well aware that it may well be unnecessary anyway, but I always think of it as a no harm/no foul kind of thing.

    My diet, in terms of fruit and veg, is sometimes brilliant, sometimes really por.

    If taking a multivitamin daily helps fill some gaps then I figure its worth it. And am yet to really see a downside, even if the upside is likely negligible.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 538Member Member Posts: 538Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    Multi vitamins have been extensively studied and there is no evidence they improve overall health outcomes like getting vitamins naturally from your food does. As far as "vitamin fortified food", I am not sure that has been studied enough as to whether or not they provide any benefit.

    I think if you are trying to focus on health, I would skip the multivitamin, only used fortified foods as a last resort, and try as much as you can to get them from foods where they occur naturally.

    In the U.S. you would have to pretty much skip any commercial baked goods, breakfast cereals, standard milk, and I don't know what else to avoid "vitamin fortified food."

    I am not saying you need to avoid them. What I mean is that I wouldn't necessarily rely on them as a source of vitamin and minerals, vs getting them from foods where they are naturally occurring.

    Unfortunately in US only 1 of 10 adults get the recommended servings of fruits and veggies (which are a significant source of vitamins). A daily supplement might not be bad for most people.

    https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/p1116-fruit-vegetable-consumption.html

    Or they could just eat more veg and fruit.

    Very true but do you see it happening in the short term?

    For some. It's easy enough, especially if one is contemplating adding a supplement.

    IMO, veg and fruit is a better choice and easy, but whatever.

    If only 1 in 10 are eating enough of these items it's a huge paradigm shift for the population as a whole. Getting a mutli in the 90% is probably a more realistic short term fix, even though not ideal.
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