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Thoughts on the “glamourizing/normalizing” obesity vs body positivity conversations

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  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Member Posts: 8,084 Member Member Posts: 8,084 Member
    https://www.cnn.com/2021/01/21/health/fat-but-fit-study-scli-intl-wellness/index.html

    Sounds like body fat is a factor of concern when it comes to health.
    edited January 22
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 1,891 Member Member Posts: 1,891 Member
    https://www.cnn.com/2021/01/21/health/fat-but-fit-study-scli-intl-wellness/index.html

    Sounds like body fat is a factor of concern when it comes to health.

    Nothing new here. Glad there are more sources researching this and calling it out.
  • LoveyCharLoveyChar Member Posts: 3,186 Member Member Posts: 3,186 Member
    qhob_89 wrote: »
    qhob_89 wrote: »
    I’m trying to understand why someone who takes such issue with the government dictating how you can socialize, would be okay with them taking such control over things like “mandatory food rationing.” It’s an asinine suggestion that fining or throwing people in jail for being obese will really prevent that problem. People still get DUIs. People still use heroin. People still shoplift. The government rationing our basic needs would create far larger problems while putting very little dent in an obesity problem.

    I'm trying to understand why someone who supports making socializing and working illegal in order to "save lives" would NOT support mandatory food rationing, fines, etc. in order to save lives. Socialization is a basic need and working for a living is necessary, yet both have been rationed for the past year while putting very little dent in our COVID problem. It's necessary to health to socialize, whereas it isn't necessary to health to be obese (quite the opposite actually).

    Of course I don't support fining people for being obese or rationing food, even if it saves lives. But I also don't support making socializing and work illegal to save lives. I'm just pointing out an inconsistency in logic here. Why do most people think the one is ok, but not the other?
    qhob_89 wrote: »
    As I already mentioned, I’m someone who also lives with PTSD and OCD, so I say this with the best of intentions. If you are not already doing so, I urge you to get in touch with your mental health provider. In a couple posts you’ve expressed you’re struggling with your mental health and the lack of socialization that usually helps you cope.

    What mental health provider? A mental health provider over Zoom who is already booked with patients because 25% of the country now want to kill themselves? (https://qz.com/1892349/cdc-depression-and-anxiety-rises-for-us-adults-since-covid-19/) And what advice are they going to give? Getting out and about, and establishing social connections, is a necessary part of treatment for both PTSD and OCD. If that's not allowed, then what advice can they possibly give?
    I feel like you’ve gone down what I like to call “the rabbit hole” and have found comfort in focusing on the fixable “obesity” issue being the larger issue than the overall pandemic and struggle that’s come with it. The “fat people” have given you something to focus on and blame and it’s not healthy or helpful for you, or others.

    No, I'm just pointing out facts that people don't want to hear even though they're supported by evidence. Don't mistake someone having an unpopular opinion with that opinion being based on emotions rather than facts. I think it's a testament to the normalization of obesity in our culture that people are clinging on to their right to be obese much more tightly than they are on their right to socialize and work.

    ypyfbth4q3jp.jpeg

    Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs... socialization is not a basic need. Is working necessary? For most in the general public, absolutely. However, nobody has made working illegal. You still never clarified where you live. I live in Chicagoland/suburbs and we’ve had a significant amount of “lockdowns” and it’s not as bad as you keep mentioning. Since March 2020 I’ve gone to the grocery store multiple times a week and I’ve socialized with a few friends (responsibly) and never had an issue. Everything I’ve seen about people getting arrested or fined for violating social distancing/stay-at-home orders/lockdowns is due to large gatherings, events, etc. If anything more extreme then it’s been in large cities such as NYC.
    I’m a mental health professional. Mental health providers have always been backed up or there’s been lack of access. (That’s a whole different topic!) If you’ve been diagnosed with PTSD/OCD I assume you have a provider. Getting out and about and socialization have never been a part of my treatment plan. So that’s not a one size fits all necessity for PTSD or OCD treatment. If I’m being honest, I’ve actually done better not getting out and socializing everyday. If socialization is part of your treatment plan, zoom/FaceTime/Skype with your friends, plan to see a couple of them- wear mask and social distance. Talk to the cashier at the grocery store, get a job at the grocery store and socialize with the general public.
    I’m not obese, so I’m not defending “my right to be obese” over “my right to socialize.” I haven’t seen anyone on this thread do so. I defended the idea that people should have access to food (and basic needs) without that being rationed. As you see in the pyramid, health and safety trump socialization and sense of connection. Do I like that there are lockdowns and possible fines for gatherings? No. But that’s how things are being handled, so I deal with it. There are many people unsatisfied with that idea, just as there were people upset over seatbelt laws and mandatory health insurance. But what do we do? We carry on and accept it. [/quote]

    I know you claim to be a mental health professional but you lost all credibility and I'm embarrassed for you. My Bachelor's Degree is in psychology. Let me educate you! All aspects under the color yellow titled Love and Belonging fall under socialization, every single one. Not seeing the actual word 'socialization' must have confused you tremendously. Friendship,intimacy, family, sense of connection[ that fall under the yellow category of 'Love and Belonging' all require socialization. Socialization is a need in order to achieve esteem and self-actualization. Are you able to understand that? Maybe you should read research on how a lack of socialization can...
  • LoveyCharLoveyChar Member Posts: 3,186 Member Member Posts: 3,186 Member
    qhob_89 wrote: »
    qhob_89 wrote: »
    I’m trying to understand why someone who takes such issue with the government dictating how you can socialize, would be okay with them taking such control over things like “mandatory food rationing.” It’s an asinine suggestion that fining or throwing people in jail for being obese will really prevent that problem. People still get DUIs. People still use heroin. People still shoplift. The government rationing our basic needs would create far larger problems while putting very little dent in an obesity problem.

    I'm trying to understand why someone who supports making socializing and working illegal in order to "save lives" would NOT support mandatory food rationing, fines, etc. in order to save lives. Socialization is a basic need and working for a living is necessary, yet both have been rationed for the past year while putting very little dent in our COVID problem. It's necessary to health to socialize, whereas it isn't necessary to health to be obese (quite the opposite actually).

    Of course I don't support fining people for being obese or rationing food, even if it saves lives. But I also don't support making socializing and work illegal to save lives. I'm just pointing out an inconsistency in logic here. Why do most people think the one is ok, but not the other?
    qhob_89 wrote: »
    As I already mentioned, I’m someone who also lives with PTSD and OCD, so I say this with the best of intentions. If you are not already doing so, I urge you to get in touch with your mental health provider. In a couple posts you’ve expressed you’re struggling with your mental health and the lack of socialization that usually helps you cope.

    What mental health provider? A mental health provider over Zoom who is already booked with patients because 25% of the country now want to kill themselves? (https://qz.com/1892349/cdc-depression-and-anxiety-rises-for-us-adults-since-covid-19/) And what advice are they going to give? Getting out and about, and establishing social connections, is a necessary part of treatment for both PTSD and OCD. If that's not allowed, then what advice can they possibly give?
    I feel like you’ve gone down what I like to call “the rabbit hole” and have found comfort in focusing on the fixable “obesity” issue being the larger issue than the overall pandemic and struggle that’s come with it. The “fat people” have given you something to focus on and blame and it’s not healthy or helpful for you, or others.

    No, I'm just pointing out facts that people don't want to hear even though they're supported by evidence. Don't mistake someone having an unpopular opinion with that opinion being based on emotions rather than facts. I think it's a testament to the normalization of obesity in our culture that people are clinging on to their right to be obese much more tightly than they are on their right to socialize and work.

    ypyfbth4q3jp.jpeg

    Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs... socialization is not a basic need. Is working necessary? For most in the general public, absolutely. However, nobody has made working illegal. You still never clarified where you live. I live in Chicagoland/suburbs and we’ve had a significant amount of “lockdowns” and it’s not as bad as you keep mentioning. Since March 2020 I’ve gone to the grocery store multiple times a week and I’ve socialized with a few friends (responsibly) and never had an issue. Everything I’ve seen about people getting arrested or fined for violating social distancing/stay-at-home orders/lockdowns is due to large gatherings, events, etc. If anything more extreme then it’s been in large cities such as NYC.
    I’m a mental health professional. Mental health providers have always been backed up or there’s been lack of access. (That’s a whole different topic!) If you’ve been diagnosed with PTSD/OCD I assume you have a provider. Getting out and about and socialization have never been a part of my treatment plan. So that’s not a one size fits all necessity for PTSD or OCD treatment. If I’m being honest, I’ve actually done better not getting out and socializing everyday. If socialization is part of your treatment plan, zoom/FaceTime/Skype with your friends, plan to see a couple of them- wear mask and social distance. Talk to the cashier at the grocery store, get a job at the grocery store and socialize with the general public.
    I’m not obese, so I’m not defending “my right to be obese” over “my right to socialize.” I haven’t seen anyone on this thread do so. I defended the idea that people should have access to food (and basic needs) without that being rationed. As you see in the pyramid, health and safety trump socialization and sense of connection. Do I like that there are lockdowns and possible fines for gatherings? No. But that’s how things are being handled, so I deal with it. There are many people unsatisfied with that idea, just as there were people upset over seatbelt laws and mandatory health insurance. But what do we do? We carry on and accept it. [/quote]
    qhob_89 wrote: »
    qhob_89 wrote: »
    I’m trying to understand why someone who takes such issue with the government dictating how you can socialize, would be okay with them taking such control over things like “mandatory food rationing.” It’s an asinine suggestion that fining or throwing people in jail for being obese will really prevent that problem. People still get DUIs. People still use heroin. People still shoplift. The government rationing our basic needs would create far larger problems while putting very little dent in an obesity problem.

    I'm trying to understand why someone who supports making socializing and working illegal in order to "save lives" would NOT support mandatory food rationing, fines, etc. in order to save lives. Socialization is a basic need and working for a living is necessary, yet both have been rationed for the past year while putting very little dent in our COVID problem. It's necessary to health to socialize, whereas it isn't necessary to health to be obese (quite the opposite actually).



    I know you claim to be a mental health professional but you lost all credibility and I'm embarrassed for you. My Bachelor's Degree is in psychology. Let me educate you! All aspects under the color yellow titled Love and Belonging fall under socialization, every single one. Not seeing the actual word 'socialization' must have confused you tremendously. Friendship,intimacy, family, sense of connection[ that fall under the yellow category of 'Love and Belonging' all require socialization. Socialization is a need in order to achieve esteem and self-actualization. Are you able to understand that? Maybe you should read research on how a lack of socialization can...
  • MaltedTeaMaltedTea Member, Premium Posts: 5,639 Member Member, Premium Posts: 5,639 Member
    Not entirely sure what's being discussed here but I'm always down for usage of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs in regular conversation so kudos @LovelyChar
  • qhob_89qhob_89 Member Posts: 97 Member Member Posts: 97 Member
    I thought of this thread when this article came across my feed on Google. I hope the poster, SiberianT, does not return. She wasn’t cool.


    https://www.nbcnews.com/think/amp/ncna1255408

    Thanks for sharing this article! Found it interesting, and so fitting for the recent topic in this thread.
    I was just given a (possible) opportunity to get vaccinated (military) and declined since I feel like the roll out has been a bit butchered. I know part of this is due to demand. But knowing my 70+ y/o MIL has been really looking forward to getting vaccinated but hasn’t been given the opportunity, (she was going to look further into this), it didn’t feel right to take a really valuable vaccine when there’s people who would have greater benefit at this time. At 31, no serious health conditions, overall “healthy” weight, unemployed, and no serious “high risk” factors... I felt there were others out there that could really benefit from it right now, and I could wait a bit longer until it becomes a bit more accessible. I’m all for a “fat person” having my dose! Lol
    ETA: I agree with your second statement as well...
    edited January 28
  • gracegettingittogethergracegettingittogether Member Posts: 177 Member Member Posts: 177 Member
    I thought of this thread when this article came across my feed on Google. I hope the poster, SiberianT, does not return. She wasn’t cool.


    https://www.nbcnews.com/think/amp/ncna1255408

    That sounds like a dangerous position to take because you disagree with someone.
    edited January 29
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 20,373 Member Member, Premium Posts: 20,373 Member
    My point was from that of compassion.

    I don't disagree with that at all, in fact I do agree. It's unreasonable and inappropriate to blame fat people for the pandemic, or for the restrictions.

    I just disagree with with some of the perspectives in the linked article, despite agreeing with its core point (as I read it) that it's appropriate for obese people to be at a higher priority for vaccinations than otherwise similar people who are not obese.

  • chantellezxcchantellezxc Member Posts: 55 Member Member Posts: 55 Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    I mean, I don't pay as much attention as I used to, but I don't see many (if any) magazines putting 350lb women on the cover, certainly not health or fashion related publications. Most "plus-size" models are just in the overweight range, and it's rare to see them on the cover of anything, except as a token "here, don't tell us we don't represent real women anymore, okay?" one off. There have been one or two actresses I can remember off the top of my head that did a lot of publicity at one point with the requisite admiration for their beauty, but no one holding them up as examples of good health.

    ETA: One of the reasons Ashley Graham gets so much media attention and controversy is because she is unique. Her weight is always being praised/criticized/argued about, and I'm not even sure if she is technically obese or not.

    I think they mean a Tess Holiday with those stats. It would make sense I remember for a short time a while ago she was on magazine covers and tv adds but she is definitely a good example of the body positivity gone too far.
    edited February 9
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