Calorie Counter

You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Why Carbs Make Us Fat...

2456

Replies

  • QueenofCaffeine4LifeQueenofCaffeine4Life Posts: 85Member Member Posts: 85Member Member
    I actually find this to be super true!!!
    I know CARBS are a macronutrient. There are good and bad points in all carbs. I do not over eat on apples, carrots, onions, sweet potatoes, etc. However, I can and will overeat on refined carbs such as donuts, cakes, cookies, chips, and the like. So I get the article and I totally understand what it is saying. I believe it because I live it!!

    For the longest of time I was on the band wagon of ALL CARBS ARE BAD FOR YOU AND WILL MAKE YOU GAIN WEIGHT- CARBS ARE THE PROBLEM. I have recently and finally understood that not to be true at all. I lived and breathed the idea that SUGAR in all forms (apple=donuts) was the reason I was overweight. Reality was it was the volume of calories I was consuming that was the cause of weight related issues.

    Very seldom, if ever, do you hear people say they gorged out on veggies...........
    However, the slogan for chips being "can't just eat one" is correct. Technically, chips would be a veggie. But its what they do to it that makes it so easy to consume in volume if you aren't mindful. Very seldom would someone eat a plain baked potato and make themselves sick for eating several. However, add butter and sour cream and cheese and bacon and all that good stuff...................it would be easy to over eat. Its not the potato that is the problem. :wink:

    I am trying to adopt an attitude that all things in moderation are okay. It has been a struggle to do so. I have trigger foods and those triggers are pretty freaking strong. But that doesn't mean that donuts are bad or chips are bad..............it just means I have to be mindful when I consume them!

    @J72FIT I agree!!
    At 43 I am finally learning balance. Super excited about that too.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 3,358Member Member Posts: 3,358Member Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »

    zr4jys19qbn9.gif

    Wow. Did the "disagrees" even read the article?!?

    I didn't disagree and I did read the article, but I don't disagree with most of the articles conclusions (besides that carbs are in fact awesome). I still think plays into a lot of anti-carb myths. I don't think it's that easy to overeat "carbs", in eating foods that are high in carbohydrates. Eating a 73 ounce steak for 3500 calories is certainly difficult. But so is eating 5 pounds of cooked pasta, or 35 slices of bread, or 25 medium potatoes, or 15 pounds of Pineapple. While everyone is different, and for some people these could be problem/trigger foods, when most people talk about "carbs", they are usually talking about things like sweets, chocolate, cookies, chips, fast food, etc. And all those things are not really "carbs" in the traditional sense, which I would define as foods with 70% or more in carb content. Most of those items could better be described as "fats" because they usually derive most of their calories from fats rather than carbs. The truth is it's that moderate carb, high fat mix that are a lot of these items that make them delicious and easy to overeat for a lot of people. But somehow fat gets to escape by Scott free while carbs take all the blame.

    If you look at the nutritional menus of any restaurant, most of their meals that are 1000 calories or more will derive most of their calories from fats, not carbs. The carbs may help make it tasty, but the fat is there to do most of the work.

    I think why a lot of people feel the need to "cut carbs" is because they don't really understand which foods are carbs, and which are not. I don't think this article helps much in that regard, as it still makes carbs out to be this evil driver of weight gain (a delicious evil, but still), when I don't believe that it is really the case.

    He also mentions...

    "Carbs are everywhere. They taste great, they can be crunchy or soft, thick or airy, chocolate or vanilla. They’re convenient, they’re easy to carry, they don’t need to be refrigerated but can taste great hot or frozen, They have a great shelf-life… really, they’re awesome. Heck, carbs can even make protein and fat taste better, and protein and fat make carbs taste better..."

    He takes into account the combo factor.

    As a one line throwaway but still places the blame on the carbs. The truth is that fats are used to make bland carbs taste good as much as the other way around. Have you ever tried to overeat Boiled potatoes or plain pasta? It's hard. But throw the potatoes in a frier with oil, or bake/mash them and add butter/sourcream/bacon and you've got yourself something worth eating. Take that pasta and slather it with butter or add a bunch of cheese or a cream sauce and some meat and then you have something you can scarf through. There's a reason why most dressings are primarily fat. Because fat tastes super good too.

    I agree. It's great that the article says carbs aren't magically evil, but it's still saying carbs are why people are fat, because they are easy to overeat. The fallacy with his 72 oz steak argument is he replaces one giant single protein with a bunch of different "carbs", and the carbs he replaces them with include a nice dose of straight up sugary beverage, and a decent amount of fat in the frap and the dessert and the mashed potatoes and probably the sandwich. Of course the varied foods full of carbs and fat are easier to overeat than a giant steak. But you could also come up with a high carb, low fat 3000 calories that would be impossible for many people to finish.

    I will go to my grave saying that people lose weight by focusing on "carbs" mostly because they eliminate caloric beverages and because the carbs they do avoid take a hefty bunch of 9-calorie fat grams with them. :lol:

    Calorie dense food IS cheap and easy, but it's not "carbs", it's "carbs & fat" or sometimes even "fat & carbs".

    Thanks for the link OP, this has been fun to read so far! (and I didn't click disagree either, I get your point :smile: )

    Yes, this.

    I could fill my diet with huge amounts of plain carbs (fruit, which I love, but wouldn't overeat given the cals, and plain bread, pasta, rice, even potatoes, heck, even sugary sweets without fat), and I'd be so bored I'd struggle to get enough cals.

    But even though I find the combinations (protein/fat, protein/fat/carbs, carbs/fat, fat/salt (as in cheese)) the hardest not to overeat, I'd never cut those all out, not only because many of them are still reasonable cals, filling, and high in nutrients (roasted veg and potatoes with some skin on chicken breast, for just one of many, many examples), but because I want a diet I love and am satisfied by. (And even if I were on a just fuel kick, which wouldn't work for me, I'd never cut out carbs like veg, which I consider among the most important part of my diet.)
    edited September 18
  • J72FITJ72FIT Posts: 5,292Member Member Posts: 5,292Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »

    zr4jys19qbn9.gif

    Wow. Did the "disagrees" even read the article?!?

    I didn't disagree and I did read the article, but I don't disagree with most of the articles conclusions (besides that carbs are in fact awesome). I still think plays into a lot of anti-carb myths. I don't think it's that easy to overeat "carbs", in eating foods that are high in carbohydrates. Eating a 73 ounce steak for 3500 calories is certainly difficult. But so is eating 5 pounds of cooked pasta, or 35 slices of bread, or 25 medium potatoes, or 15 pounds of Pineapple. While everyone is different, and for some people these could be problem/trigger foods, when most people talk about "carbs", they are usually talking about things like sweets, chocolate, cookies, chips, fast food, etc. And all those things are not really "carbs" in the traditional sense, which I would define as foods with 70% or more in carb content. Most of those items could better be described as "fats" because they usually derive most of their calories from fats rather than carbs. The truth is it's that moderate carb, high fat mix that are a lot of these items that make them delicious and easy to overeat for a lot of people. But somehow fat gets to escape by Scott free while carbs take all the blame.

    If you look at the nutritional menus of any restaurant, most of their meals that are 1000 calories or more will derive most of their calories from fats, not carbs. The carbs may help make it tasty, but the fat is there to do most of the work.

    I think why a lot of people feel the need to "cut carbs" is because they don't really understand which foods are carbs, and which are not. I don't think this article helps much in that regard, as it still makes carbs out to be this evil driver of weight gain (a delicious evil, but still), when I don't believe that it is really the case.

    He also mentions...

    "Carbs are everywhere. They taste great, they can be crunchy or soft, thick or airy, chocolate or vanilla. They’re convenient, they’re easy to carry, they don’t need to be refrigerated but can taste great hot or frozen, They have a great shelf-life… really, they’re awesome. Heck, carbs can even make protein and fat taste better, and protein and fat make carbs taste better..."

    He takes into account the combo factor.

    As a one line throwaway but still places the blame on the carbs. The truth is that fats are used to make bland carbs taste good as much as the other way around. Have you ever tried to overeat Boiled potatoes or plain pasta? It's hard. But throw the potatoes in a frier with oil, or bake/mash them and add butter/sourcream/bacon and you've got yourself something worth eating. Take that pasta and slather it with butter or add a bunch of cheese or a cream sauce and some meat and then you have something you can scarf through. There's a reason why most dressings are primarily fat. Because fat tastes super good too.

    Not on it's own...

    I'd take plain cheese (mostly fat) over plain rice (mostly carbs) any day.

    Rice for me...
  • SarahAnne3958SarahAnne3958 Posts: 78Member Member Posts: 78Member Member
    J72FIT wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »

    zr4jys19qbn9.gif

    Wow. Did the "disagrees" even read the article?!?

    I didn't disagree and I did read the article, but I don't disagree with most of the articles conclusions (besides that carbs are in fact awesome). I still think plays into a lot of anti-carb myths. I don't think it's that easy to overeat "carbs", in eating foods that are high in carbohydrates. Eating a 73 ounce steak for 3500 calories is certainly difficult. But so is eating 5 pounds of cooked pasta, or 35 slices of bread, or 25 medium potatoes, or 15 pounds of Pineapple. While everyone is different, and for some people these could be problem/trigger foods, when most people talk about "carbs", they are usually talking about things like sweets, chocolate, cookies, chips, fast food, etc. And all those things are not really "carbs" in the traditional sense, which I would define as foods with 70% or more in carb content. Most of those items could better be described as "fats" because they usually derive most of their calories from fats rather than carbs. The truth is it's that moderate carb, high fat mix that are a lot of these items that make them delicious and easy to overeat for a lot of people. But somehow fat gets to escape by Scott free while carbs take all the blame.

    If you look at the nutritional menus of any restaurant, most of their meals that are 1000 calories or more will derive most of their calories from fats, not carbs. The carbs may help make it tasty, but the fat is there to do most of the work.

    I think why a lot of people feel the need to "cut carbs" is because they don't really understand which foods are carbs, and which are not. I don't think this article helps much in that regard, as it still makes carbs out to be this evil driver of weight gain (a delicious evil, but still), when I don't believe that it is really the case.

    He also mentions...

    "Carbs are everywhere. They taste great, they can be crunchy or soft, thick or airy, chocolate or vanilla. They’re convenient, they’re easy to carry, they don’t need to be refrigerated but can taste great hot or frozen, They have a great shelf-life… really, they’re awesome. Heck, carbs can even make protein and fat taste better, and protein and fat make carbs taste better..."

    He takes into account the combo factor.

    As a one line throwaway but still places the blame on the carbs. The truth is that fats are used to make bland carbs taste good as much as the other way around. Have you ever tried to overeat Boiled potatoes or plain pasta? It's hard. But throw the potatoes in a frier with oil, or bake/mash them and add butter/sourcream/bacon and you've got yourself something worth eating. Take that pasta and slather it with butter or add a bunch of cheese or a cream sauce and some meat and then you have something you can scarf through. There's a reason why most dressings are primarily fat. Because fat tastes super good too.

    Not on it's own...

    I'd take plain cheese (mostly fat) over plain rice (mostly carbs) any day.

    Rice for me...

    I posted in another thread that of all the things I miss the most from my dietary changes, it's white rice that I miss the most. Plain with a bit if salt or soy sauce.

  • mmapagsmmapags Posts: 8,157Member Member Posts: 8,157Member Member
    J72FIT wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »

    zr4jys19qbn9.gif

    Wow. Did the "disagrees" even read the article?!?

    I didn't disagree and I did read the article, but I don't disagree with most of the articles conclusions (besides that carbs are in fact awesome). I still think plays into a lot of anti-carb myths. I don't think it's that easy to overeat "carbs", in eating foods that are high in carbohydrates. Eating a 73 ounce steak for 3500 calories is certainly difficult. But so is eating 5 pounds of cooked pasta, or 35 slices of bread, or 25 medium potatoes, or 15 pounds of Pineapple. While everyone is different, and for some people these could be problem/trigger foods, when most people talk about "carbs", they are usually talking about things like sweets, chocolate, cookies, chips, fast food, etc. And all those things are not really "carbs" in the traditional sense, which I would define as foods with 70% or more in carb content. Most of those items could better be described as "fats" because they usually derive most of their calories from fats rather than carbs. The truth is it's that moderate carb, high fat mix that are a lot of these items that make them delicious and easy to overeat for a lot of people. But somehow fat gets to escape by Scott free while carbs take all the blame.

    If you look at the nutritional menus of any restaurant, most of their meals that are 1000 calories or more will derive most of their calories from fats, not carbs. The carbs may help make it tasty, but the fat is there to do most of the work.

    I think why a lot of people feel the need to "cut carbs" is because they don't really understand which foods are carbs, and which are not. I don't think this article helps much in that regard, as it still makes carbs out to be this evil driver of weight gain (a delicious evil, but still), when I don't believe that it is really the case.

    He also mentions...

    "Carbs are everywhere. They taste great, they can be crunchy or soft, thick or airy, chocolate or vanilla. They’re convenient, they’re easy to carry, they don’t need to be refrigerated but can taste great hot or frozen, They have a great shelf-life… really, they’re awesome. Heck, carbs can even make protein and fat taste better, and protein and fat make carbs taste better..."

    He takes into account the combo factor.

    As a one line throwaway but still places the blame on the carbs. The truth is that fats are used to make bland carbs taste good as much as the other way around. Have you ever tried to overeat Boiled potatoes or plain pasta? It's hard. But throw the potatoes in a frier with oil, or bake/mash them and add butter/sourcream/bacon and you've got yourself something worth eating. Take that pasta and slather it with butter or add a bunch of cheese or a cream sauce and some meat and then you have something you can scarf through. There's a reason why most dressings are primarily fat. Because fat tastes super good too.

    Not on it's own...

    I'd take plain cheese (mostly fat) over plain rice (mostly carbs) any day.

    Rice for me...

    Me too. I've never been that much of a cheese guy. But I do love me some starchy carbs.
  • mmapagsmmapags Posts: 8,157Member Member Posts: 8,157Member Member
    J72FIT wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »

    zr4jys19qbn9.gif

    Wow. Did the "disagrees" even read the article?!?

    I didn't disagree and I did read the article, but I don't disagree with most of the articles conclusions (besides that carbs are in fact awesome). I still think plays into a lot of anti-carb myths. I don't think it's that easy to overeat "carbs", in eating foods that are high in carbohydrates. Eating a 73 ounce steak for 3500 calories is certainly difficult. But so is eating 5 pounds of cooked pasta, or 35 slices of bread, or 25 medium potatoes, or 15 pounds of Pineapple. While everyone is different, and for some people these could be problem/trigger foods, when most people talk about "carbs", they are usually talking about things like sweets, chocolate, cookies, chips, fast food, etc. And all those things are not really "carbs" in the traditional sense, which I would define as foods with 70% or more in carb content. Most of those items could better be described as "fats" because they usually derive most of their calories from fats rather than carbs. The truth is it's that moderate carb, high fat mix that are a lot of these items that make them delicious and easy to overeat for a lot of people. But somehow fat gets to escape by Scott free while carbs take all the blame.

    If you look at the nutritional menus of any restaurant, most of their meals that are 1000 calories or more will derive most of their calories from fats, not carbs. The carbs may help make it tasty, but the fat is there to do most of the work.

    I think why a lot of people feel the need to "cut carbs" is because they don't really understand which foods are carbs, and which are not. I don't think this article helps much in that regard, as it still makes carbs out to be this evil driver of weight gain (a delicious evil, but still), when I don't believe that it is really the case.

    He also mentions...

    "Carbs are everywhere. They taste great, they can be crunchy or soft, thick or airy, chocolate or vanilla. They’re convenient, they’re easy to carry, they don’t need to be refrigerated but can taste great hot or frozen, They have a great shelf-life… really, they’re awesome. Heck, carbs can even make protein and fat taste better, and protein and fat make carbs taste better..."

    He takes into account the combo factor.

    As a one line throwaway but still places the blame on the carbs. The truth is that fats are used to make bland carbs taste good as much as the other way around. Have you ever tried to overeat Boiled potatoes or plain pasta? It's hard. But throw the potatoes in a frier with oil, or bake/mash them and add butter/sourcream/bacon and you've got yourself something worth eating. Take that pasta and slather it with butter or add a bunch of cheese or a cream sauce and some meat and then you have something you can scarf through. There's a reason why most dressings are primarily fat. Because fat tastes super good too.

    Not on it's own...

    I'd take plain cheese (mostly fat) over plain rice (mostly carbs) any day.

    Rice for me...

    I posted in another thread that of all the things I miss the most from my dietary changes, it's white rice that I miss the most. Plain with a bit if salt or soy sauce.

    Why not have some occasionally? There are 2 rice dishes that are my favorites. One is kind of carribean thing with cilantro, sesame oil, red onion and lime juice. The other is spanish saffron rice. Both very yummy and not too calorically dense in a reasonable portion.

    I read a little of your back story so I understand your current approach but would flexibility lead to a problem occasionally?
  • MikePTYMikePTY Posts: 3,108Member, Premium Member Posts: 3,108Member, Premium Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »

    zr4jys19qbn9.gif

    Wow. Did the "disagrees" even read the article?!?

    I didn't disagree and I did read the article, but I don't disagree with most of the articles conclusions (besides that carbs are in fact awesome). I still think plays into a lot of anti-carb myths. I don't think it's that easy to overeat "carbs", in eating foods that are high in carbohydrates. Eating a 73 ounce steak for 3500 calories is certainly difficult. But so is eating 5 pounds of cooked pasta, or 35 slices of bread, or 25 medium potatoes, or 15 pounds of Pineapple. While everyone is different, and for some people these could be problem/trigger foods, when most people talk about "carbs", they are usually talking about things like sweets, chocolate, cookies, chips, fast food, etc. And all those things are not really "carbs" in the traditional sense, which I would define as foods with 70% or more in carb content. Most of those items could better be described as "fats" because they usually derive most of their calories from fats rather than carbs. The truth is it's that moderate carb, high fat mix that are a lot of these items that make them delicious and easy to overeat for a lot of people. But somehow fat gets to escape by Scott free while carbs take all the blame.

    If you look at the nutritional menus of any restaurant, most of their meals that are 1000 calories or more will derive most of their calories from fats, not carbs. The carbs may help make it tasty, but the fat is there to do most of the work.

    I think why a lot of people feel the need to "cut carbs" is because they don't really understand which foods are carbs, and which are not. I don't think this article helps much in that regard, as it still makes carbs out to be this evil driver of weight gain (a delicious evil, but still), when I don't believe that it is really the case.

    He also mentions...

    "Carbs are everywhere. They taste great, they can be crunchy or soft, thick or airy, chocolate or vanilla. They’re convenient, they’re easy to carry, they don’t need to be refrigerated but can taste great hot or frozen, They have a great shelf-life… really, they’re awesome. Heck, carbs can even make protein and fat taste better, and protein and fat make carbs taste better..."

    He takes into account the combo factor.

    As a one line throwaway but still places the blame on the carbs. The truth is that fats are used to make bland carbs taste good as much as the other way around. Have you ever tried to overeat Boiled potatoes or plain pasta? It's hard. But throw the potatoes in a frier with oil, or bake/mash them and add butter/sourcream/bacon and you've got yourself something worth eating. Take that pasta and slather it with butter or add a bunch of cheese or a cream sauce and some meat and then you have something you can scarf through. There's a reason why most dressings are primarily fat. Because fat tastes super good too.

    Not on it's own...

    I'd take plain cheese (mostly fat) over plain rice (mostly carbs) any day.

    I'll be honest I would totally put cheese on my rice and it would probably be delicious.

    My diet features both pretty heavily. I've had rice for lunch every day this week because it is a mainstay of Latin American food but when I make things for myself I will pretty much put cheese on any and everything.
    edited September 19
  • apullumapullum Posts: 4,240Member Member Posts: 4,240Member Member
    MikePTY wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »

    zr4jys19qbn9.gif

    Wow. Did the "disagrees" even read the article?!?

    I didn't disagree and I did read the article, but I don't disagree with most of the articles conclusions (besides that carbs are in fact awesome). I still think plays into a lot of anti-carb myths. I don't think it's that easy to overeat "carbs", in eating foods that are high in carbohydrates. Eating a 73 ounce steak for 3500 calories is certainly difficult. But so is eating 5 pounds of cooked pasta, or 35 slices of bread, or 25 medium potatoes, or 15 pounds of Pineapple. While everyone is different, and for some people these could be problem/trigger foods, when most people talk about "carbs", they are usually talking about things like sweets, chocolate, cookies, chips, fast food, etc. And all those things are not really "carbs" in the traditional sense, which I would define as foods with 70% or more in carb content. Most of those items could better be described as "fats" because they usually derive most of their calories from fats rather than carbs. The truth is it's that moderate carb, high fat mix that are a lot of these items that make them delicious and easy to overeat for a lot of people. But somehow fat gets to escape by Scott free while carbs take all the blame.

    If you look at the nutritional menus of any restaurant, most of their meals that are 1000 calories or more will derive most of their calories from fats, not carbs. The carbs may help make it tasty, but the fat is there to do most of the work.

    I think why a lot of people feel the need to "cut carbs" is because they don't really understand which foods are carbs, and which are not. I don't think this article helps much in that regard, as it still makes carbs out to be this evil driver of weight gain (a delicious evil, but still), when I don't believe that it is really the case.

    He also mentions...

    "Carbs are everywhere. They taste great, they can be crunchy or soft, thick or airy, chocolate or vanilla. They’re convenient, they’re easy to carry, they don’t need to be refrigerated but can taste great hot or frozen, They have a great shelf-life… really, they’re awesome. Heck, carbs can even make protein and fat taste better, and protein and fat make carbs taste better..."

    He takes into account the combo factor.

    As a one line throwaway but still places the blame on the carbs. The truth is that fats are used to make bland carbs taste good as much as the other way around. Have you ever tried to overeat Boiled potatoes or plain pasta? It's hard. But throw the potatoes in a frier with oil, or bake/mash them and add butter/sourcream/bacon and you've got yourself something worth eating. Take that pasta and slather it with butter or add a bunch of cheese or a cream sauce and some meat and then you have something you can scarf through. There's a reason why most dressings are primarily fat. Because fat tastes super good too.

    Not on it's own...

    I'd take plain cheese (mostly fat) over plain rice (mostly carbs) any day.

    I'll be honest I would totally put cheese on my rice and it would probably be delicious.

    My diet features both pretty heavily. I've had rice for lunch every day this week because it is a mainstay of Latin American food but when I make things for myself I will pretty much put cheese on any and everything.

    Cheesy rice is really freaking delicious.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 3,358Member Member Posts: 3,358Member Member
    J72FIT wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »

    zr4jys19qbn9.gif

    Wow. Did the "disagrees" even read the article?!?

    I didn't disagree and I did read the article, but I don't disagree with most of the articles conclusions (besides that carbs are in fact awesome). I still think plays into a lot of anti-carb myths. I don't think it's that easy to overeat "carbs", in eating foods that are high in carbohydrates. Eating a 73 ounce steak for 3500 calories is certainly difficult. But so is eating 5 pounds of cooked pasta, or 35 slices of bread, or 25 medium potatoes, or 15 pounds of Pineapple. While everyone is different, and for some people these could be problem/trigger foods, when most people talk about "carbs", they are usually talking about things like sweets, chocolate, cookies, chips, fast food, etc. And all those things are not really "carbs" in the traditional sense, which I would define as foods with 70% or more in carb content. Most of those items could better be described as "fats" because they usually derive most of their calories from fats rather than carbs. The truth is it's that moderate carb, high fat mix that are a lot of these items that make them delicious and easy to overeat for a lot of people. But somehow fat gets to escape by Scott free while carbs take all the blame.

    If you look at the nutritional menus of any restaurant, most of their meals that are 1000 calories or more will derive most of their calories from fats, not carbs. The carbs may help make it tasty, but the fat is there to do most of the work.

    I think why a lot of people feel the need to "cut carbs" is because they don't really understand which foods are carbs, and which are not. I don't think this article helps much in that regard, as it still makes carbs out to be this evil driver of weight gain (a delicious evil, but still), when I don't believe that it is really the case.

    He also mentions...

    "Carbs are everywhere. They taste great, they can be crunchy or soft, thick or airy, chocolate or vanilla. They’re convenient, they’re easy to carry, they don’t need to be refrigerated but can taste great hot or frozen, They have a great shelf-life… really, they’re awesome. Heck, carbs can even make protein and fat taste better, and protein and fat make carbs taste better..."

    He takes into account the combo factor.

    As a one line throwaway but still places the blame on the carbs. The truth is that fats are used to make bland carbs taste good as much as the other way around. Have you ever tried to overeat Boiled potatoes or plain pasta? It's hard. But throw the potatoes in a frier with oil, or bake/mash them and add butter/sourcream/bacon and you've got yourself something worth eating. Take that pasta and slather it with butter or add a bunch of cheese or a cream sauce and some meat and then you have something you can scarf through. There's a reason why most dressings are primarily fat. Because fat tastes super good too.

    Not on it's own...

    I'd take plain cheese (mostly fat) over plain rice (mostly carbs) any day.

    Rice for me...

    I posted in another thread that of all the things I miss the most from my dietary changes, it's white rice that I miss the most. Plain with a bit if salt or soy sauce.

    Interesting how different people are. I like rice fine, with veg and protein (which generally includes a little fat too), but I'd never think to eat it plain. Give me unlimited plain white rice (even with soy sauce, which adds salt), and I'd never overeat.

    That's pretty much the case for me and anything that's just plain carbs.
  • SarahAnne3958SarahAnne3958 Posts: 78Member Member Posts: 78Member Member
    mmapags wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »

    zr4jys19qbn9.gif

    Wow. Did the "disagrees" even read the article?!?

    I didn't disagree and I did read the article, but I don't disagree with most of the articles conclusions (besides that carbs are in fact awesome). I still think plays into a lot of anti-carb myths. I don't think it's that easy to overeat "carbs", in eating foods that are high in carbohydrates. Eating a 73 ounce steak for 3500 calories is certainly difficult. But so is eating 5 pounds of cooked pasta, or 35 slices of bread, or 25 medium potatoes, or 15 pounds of Pineapple. While everyone is different, and for some people these could be problem/trigger foods, when most people talk about "carbs", they are usually talking about things like sweets, chocolate, cookies, chips, fast food, etc. And all those things are not really "carbs" in the traditional sense, which I would define as foods with 70% or more in carb content. Most of those items could better be described as "fats" because they usually derive most of their calories from fats rather than carbs. The truth is it's that moderate carb, high fat mix that are a lot of these items that make them delicious and easy to overeat for a lot of people. But somehow fat gets to escape by Scott free while carbs take all the blame.

    If you look at the nutritional menus of any restaurant, most of their meals that are 1000 calories or more will derive most of their calories from fats, not carbs. The carbs may help make it tasty, but the fat is there to do most of the work.

    I think why a lot of people feel the need to "cut carbs" is because they don't really understand which foods are carbs, and which are not. I don't think this article helps much in that regard, as it still makes carbs out to be this evil driver of weight gain (a delicious evil, but still), when I don't believe that it is really the case.

    He also mentions...

    "Carbs are everywhere. They taste great, they can be crunchy or soft, thick or airy, chocolate or vanilla. They’re convenient, they’re easy to carry, they don’t need to be refrigerated but can taste great hot or frozen, They have a great shelf-life… really, they’re awesome. Heck, carbs can even make protein and fat taste better, and protein and fat make carbs taste better..."

    He takes into account the combo factor.

    As a one line throwaway but still places the blame on the carbs. The truth is that fats are used to make bland carbs taste good as much as the other way around. Have you ever tried to overeat Boiled potatoes or plain pasta? It's hard. But throw the potatoes in a frier with oil, or bake/mash them and add butter/sourcream/bacon and you've got yourself something worth eating. Take that pasta and slather it with butter or add a bunch of cheese or a cream sauce and some meat and then you have something you can scarf through. There's a reason why most dressings are primarily fat. Because fat tastes super good too.

    Not on it's own...

    I'd take plain cheese (mostly fat) over plain rice (mostly carbs) any day.

    Rice for me...

    I posted in another thread that of all the things I miss the most from my dietary changes, it's white rice that I miss the most. Plain with a bit if salt or soy sauce.

    Why not have some occasionally? There are 2 rice dishes that are my favorites. One is kind of carribean thing with cilantro, sesame oil, red onion and lime juice. The other is spanish saffron rice. Both very yummy and not too calorically dense in a reasonable portion.

    I read a little of your back story so I understand your current approach but would flexibility lead to a problem occasionally?

    At this point I don't have any interest in veering off of my current woe. I'm in such a good place right now that I just don't feel like making any changes. I may adjust things down the road but right now I'm good :)
    edited September 19
  • mmapagsmmapags Posts: 8,157Member Member Posts: 8,157Member Member
    MikePTY wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »

    zr4jys19qbn9.gif

    Wow. Did the "disagrees" even read the article?!?

    I didn't disagree and I did read the article, but I don't disagree with most of the articles conclusions (besides that carbs are in fact awesome). I still think plays into a lot of anti-carb myths. I don't think it's that easy to overeat "carbs", in eating foods that are high in carbohydrates. Eating a 73 ounce steak for 3500 calories is certainly difficult. But so is eating 5 pounds of cooked pasta, or 35 slices of bread, or 25 medium potatoes, or 15 pounds of Pineapple. While everyone is different, and for some people these could be problem/trigger foods, when most people talk about "carbs", they are usually talking about things like sweets, chocolate, cookies, chips, fast food, etc. And all those things are not really "carbs" in the traditional sense, which I would define as foods with 70% or more in carb content. Most of those items could better be described as "fats" because they usually derive most of their calories from fats rather than carbs. The truth is it's that moderate carb, high fat mix that are a lot of these items that make them delicious and easy to overeat for a lot of people. But somehow fat gets to escape by Scott free while carbs take all the blame.

    If you look at the nutritional menus of any restaurant, most of their meals that are 1000 calories or more will derive most of their calories from fats, not carbs. The carbs may help make it tasty, but the fat is there to do most of the work.

    I think why a lot of people feel the need to "cut carbs" is because they don't really understand which foods are carbs, and which are not. I don't think this article helps much in that regard, as it still makes carbs out to be this evil driver of weight gain (a delicious evil, but still), when I don't believe that it is really the case.

    He also mentions...

    "Carbs are everywhere. They taste great, they can be crunchy or soft, thick or airy, chocolate or vanilla. They’re convenient, they’re easy to carry, they don’t need to be refrigerated but can taste great hot or frozen, They have a great shelf-life… really, they’re awesome. Heck, carbs can even make protein and fat taste better, and protein and fat make carbs taste better..."

    He takes into account the combo factor.

    As a one line throwaway but still places the blame on the carbs. The truth is that fats are used to make bland carbs taste good as much as the other way around. Have you ever tried to overeat Boiled potatoes or plain pasta? It's hard. But throw the potatoes in a frier with oil, or bake/mash them and add butter/sourcream/bacon and you've got yourself something worth eating. Take that pasta and slather it with butter or add a bunch of cheese or a cream sauce and some meat and then you have something you can scarf through. There's a reason why most dressings are primarily fat. Because fat tastes super good too.

    Not on it's own...

    I'd take plain cheese (mostly fat) over plain rice (mostly carbs) any day.

    I'll be honest I would totally put cheese on my rice and it would probably be delicious.

    My diet features both pretty heavily. I've had rice for lunch every day this week because it is a mainstay of Latin American food but when I make things for myself I will pretty much put cheese on any and everything.

    Risotto!
Sign In or Register to comment.