Myfitnesspal

Message Boards General Health, Fitness and Diet
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Coronavirus prep

1536537539541542606

Replies

  • T1DCarnivoreRunnerT1DCarnivoreRunner Member Posts: 11,279 Member Member Posts: 11,279 Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    I have to say that I am very frustrated at the lack of availability of vaccines. It seems like some states have plenty of doses available while others have scarce supply. Dr. Fauci had said everyone could be able to get it by sping, but some areas are still in phase 1 and I don't see how spring could even be possible. Everything I can see leads me to believe I won't get a vaccine until mid-2022.

    I think he said there will be enough vaccine for everyone by then. Getting it into everyone's arms is a different story.

    It's definitely going too slow. Once the states that are doing better finish up, hopefully their resources (and fed resources) will be diverted to areas lagging behind and there will be a snowball effect. Hopefully.

    To be honest it's much more cost effective to train additional resources to administer the shots in under served areas than to pay travel, food and lodging for moving resources to an area.

    I would suggest that states should deploy their national guards to help administrator vaccines. However, this is not the problem here. Each day, counties in my state report their status. My county goes from "limited vaccine available" to "no vaccine available" fairly quickly... then stays that way until the next shipment. For example, they got more vaccines delivered over this past weekend. That shipment was delayed a couple days, probably because of the unprecedented amount of ice and snow.

    We have the same problem in Virginia. They could be vaxxing thousands more per week if they had the doses. Supposedly the new deals the new administration reached has manufacturing ramping up significantly, so I'd like to think that will show up in supply soon, along with getting past snowstorm season. And I think that once the parts of VA that are better organized get ahead they can spare doses and staff to neighboring rural areas that are lagging behind, but that's going to be different from state to state too. We shall see. The fact that there will be areas of the country lagging far behind, keeping cases high and leaving open the possibility of further mutations, is obviously worrisome. It's so frustrating.

    Agreed. I'm in TN, but have a lot of friends in IA and other states. Here, almost nobody is getting vaccinated. From what I hear from friends in IA, all but a few there have had the chance already.
  • jenilla1jenilla1 Member Posts: 10,848 Member Member Posts: 10,848 Member
  • T1DCarnivoreRunnerT1DCarnivoreRunner Member Posts: 11,279 Member Member Posts: 11,279 Member
    musicfan68 wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    I have to say that I am very frustrated at the lack of availability of vaccines. It seems like some states have plenty of doses available while others have scarce supply. Dr. Fauci had said everyone could be able to get it by sping, but some areas are still in phase 1 and I don't see how spring could even be possible. Everything I can see leads me to believe I won't get a vaccine until mid-2022.

    I think he said there will be enough vaccine for everyone by then. Getting it into everyone's arms is a different story.

    It's definitely going too slow. Once the states that are doing better finish up, hopefully their resources (and fed resources) will be diverted to areas lagging behind and there will be a snowball effect. Hopefully.

    To be honest it's much more cost effective to train additional resources to administer the shots in under served areas than to pay travel, food and lodging for moving resources to an area.

    I would suggest that states should deploy their national guards to help administrator vaccines. However, this is not the problem here. Each day, counties in my state report their status. My county goes from "limited vaccine available" to "no vaccine available" fairly quickly... then stays that way until the next shipment. For example, they got more vaccines delivered over this past weekend. That shipment was delayed a couple days, probably because of the unprecedented amount of ice and snow.

    We have the same problem in Virginia. They could be vaxxing thousands more per week if they had the doses. Supposedly the new deals the new administration reached has manufacturing ramping up significantly, so I'd like to think that will show up in supply soon, along with getting past snowstorm season. And I think that once the parts of VA that are better organized get ahead they can spare doses and staff to neighboring rural areas that are lagging behind, but that's going to be different from state to state too. We shall see. The fact that there will be areas of the country lagging far behind, keeping cases high and leaving open the possibility of further mutations, is obviously worrisome. It's so frustrating.

    Agreed. I'm in TN, but have a lot of friends in IA and other states. Here, almost nobody is getting vaccinated. From what I hear from friends in IA, all but a few there have had the chance already.

    I'm from Iowa and no, we are severely lagging behind. My county has 100,000 people and only about 3 % of the population has been vaccinated. They get about 3,000 doses every other week and they spoken for in minutes. It will be a month or two to get most of the over 65 done. I don't think I will be able to get it unril late this summer at the rate they are going.

    From what I heard in Iowa, if you are willing to drive and are at least 65 years old, you can get one through Hy-Vee. Just have to find a store with vaccines available, so might take a lot of calling.

    Edit: He says go to the Hy-Vee Pharmacy website to find a location.

    ETA again: Website says do not call, but use site instead: https://www.hy-vee.com/my-pharmacy/covid-vaccine
    edited February 23
  • Theo166Theo166 Member, Premium Posts: 2,528 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,528 Member
    Although there may be local issues with the roll out, the US is leading the world with our COVID vaccine response. Be optimistic for the rest of the year.

    https://www.axios.com/vaccine-distribution-by-country-us-rollout-doses-9c47fa53-6a2e-4c56-8792-dd31bee34b10.html
  • Theo166Theo166 Member, Premium Posts: 2,528 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,528 Member
    This NY Times article has good data comparing the US States
    See How the Vaccine Rollout Is Going in Your State
  • missysippy930missysippy930 Member Posts: 2,487 Member Member Posts: 2,487 Member
    Minnesota lagging behind also. Not enough vaccine to go around for those that want the vaccine. Hasn’t been enough since the very first day it was available.
  • rheddmobilerheddmobile Member Posts: 6,259 Member Member Posts: 6,259 Member
    jenilla1 wrote: »

    That is tragic.

    So, my question here is, how is the surgical team handling this such that 11 people on the surgical team caught Covid from the transplanted lungs? Aren’t surgeons normally wearing masks and protective equipment and handling things carefully? How does the Covid get from the lungs into the surgeon?
  • Theo166Theo166 Member, Premium Posts: 2,528 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,528 Member

    That is tragic.

    So, my question here is, how is the surgical team handling this such that 11 people on the surgical team caught Covid from the transplanted lungs? Aren’t surgeons normally wearing masks and protective equipment and handling things carefully? How does the Covid get from the lungs into the surgeon?
    No, only one of the 11 people tested positive, but a good question why/how the surgeon caught the virus.
  • rheddmobilerheddmobile Member Posts: 6,259 Member Member Posts: 6,259 Member
    Theo166 wrote: »

    That is tragic.

    So, my question here is, how is the surgical team handling this such that 11 people on the surgical team caught Covid from the transplanted lungs? Aren’t surgeons normally wearing masks and protective equipment and handling things carefully? How does the Covid get from the lungs into the surgeon?
    No, only one of the 11 people tested positive, but a good question why/how the surgeon caught the virus.

    You’re right, I misread that.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 24,039 Member Member Posts: 24,039 Member
    Theo166 wrote: »
    This NY Times article has good data comparing the US States
    See How the Vaccine Rollout Is Going in Your State

    Wow, considering how hard it was to get my mother a shot, am surprised to see Massachusetts in the dark green. Maybe we did a good job with priority 1 people, and started slipping once we opened it to seniors.

    Thanks for posting!
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 24,039 Member Member Posts: 24,039 Member
    Theo166 wrote: »
    Although there may be local issues with the roll out, the US is leading the world with our COVID vaccine response. Be optimistic for the rest of the year.

    https://www.axios.com/vaccine-distribution-by-country-us-rollout-doses-9c47fa53-6a2e-4c56-8792-dd31bee34b10.html

    This was a surprise too. I was fully expecting to see that the numbers were not adjusted by population, and was wrong:

    "The U.S. has carried out more vaccinations than any country in the world, and given a first dose to a higher percentage of its population (12%) than all but five countries: Israel, the Seychelles, the UAE, the U.K. and Bahrain."

    Reasons in the article.
  • kimny72kimny72 Member Posts: 15,871 Member Member Posts: 15,871 Member
    jenilla1 wrote: »

    That is tragic.

    So, my question here is, how is the surgical team handling this such that 11 people on the surgical team caught Covid from the transplanted lungs? Aren’t surgeons normally wearing masks and protective equipment and handling things carefully? How does the Covid get from the lungs into the surgeon?

    Crap I can't remember where I read it. But the article I read said that the donor and the recipient both initially tested negative, so the surgical team just wore surgical masks, not N95s and eye protection.

    I'm not sure how they determined after the fact that the covid originated in the donated lungs, rather than just a case of the recipient throwing a false negative, or being too early in the infection to test positive.
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 8,755 Member Member Posts: 8,755 Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    jenilla1 wrote: »

    That is tragic.

    So, my question here is, how is the surgical team handling this such that 11 people on the surgical team caught Covid from the transplanted lungs? Aren’t surgeons normally wearing masks and protective equipment and handling things carefully? How does the Covid get from the lungs into the surgeon?

    Crap I can't remember where I read it. But the article I read said that the donor and the recipient both initially tested negative, so the surgical team just wore surgical masks, not N95s and eye protection.

    I'm not sure how they determined after the fact that the covid originated in the donated lungs, rather than just a case of the recipient throwing a false negative, or being too early in the infection to test positive.

    For some reason (I forget why, or if the article I read said), they had a sample from the lungs prior to the transplant, and they went back and checked that.
Sign In or Register to comment.