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Powerlifting or bodybuilding?!

jbboom23jbboom23 Member Posts: 15 Member Member Posts: 15 Member
which have you found to be the most effective for putting on mass? I guess we can through crossfit in there....I guess

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  • jessef593jessef593 Member Posts: 2,281 Member Member Posts: 2,281 Member
    jbboom23 wrote: »
    which have you found to be the most effective for putting on mass? I guess we can through crossfit in there....I guess

    It's in the name.. bodybuilding. When powerlifting I get powerful. I feel stronger. However when focussing on hypertrophy I'm actually bigger.

    If you want size. Get on a bodybuilding program and eat in a surplus
  • jessef593jessef593 Member Posts: 2,281 Member Member Posts: 2,281 Member
    And do not even touch crossfit. It's not a mass builder. It's an injury provoker
  • Mellouk89Mellouk89 Member Posts: 104 Member Member Posts: 104 Member
    I never did powerlifting, I always did 6-12 reps for 3-4 sets.

    I don't really think strength is correlated with size, I was once a pretty strong dude and there were guys much bigger than me at the gym who lifted lighter weights.

    I just started lifted again and i'm questionning if it's worth it to lift really heavy.
    edited September 4
  • jessef593jessef593 Member Posts: 2,281 Member Member Posts: 2,281 Member
    Mellouk89 wrote: »
    I never did powerlifting, I always did 6-12 reps for 3-4 sets.

    I don't really think strength is correlated with size, I was once a pretty strong dude and there were guys much bigger than me at the gym who lifted lighter weights.

    I just started lifted again and i'm questionning if it's worth it to lift really heavy.

    There is a correlation between muscle mass and strength but not so much strength and muscle mass.

    More muscle has a greater potential for contractile force. However mass Is not needed for contractile force.

    You will see greater development from targeted exercises and more volume. Opposed to large compound movements that utilize multiple leverages.
  • jessef593jessef593 Member Posts: 2,281 Member Member Posts: 2,281 Member
    Disagreer state your reasoning or piss off. Look up my comment about how insignificant your pathetic life is since you literally have to follow me from post to post just to disagree without providing anything useful
  • Mellouk89Mellouk89 Member Posts: 104 Member Member Posts: 104 Member
    jessef593 wrote: »
    Mellouk89 wrote: »
    I never did powerlifting, I always did 6-12 reps for 3-4 sets.

    I don't really think strength is correlated with size, I was once a pretty strong dude and there were guys much bigger than me at the gym who lifted lighter weights.

    I just started lifted again and i'm questionning if it's worth it to lift really heavy.

    There is a correlation between muscle mass and strength but not so much strength and muscle mass.

    Yeah that's a better way to put it. I see really big dudes in the gym who aren't so strong.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,579 Member Member Posts: 8,579 Member
    If goal is hypertrophy, then we lean towards a hypertrophy response- bodybuilding.

    If goal is strength, then we lean towards a strength response- powerlifting or whatever measurement of strength you are defining.

    Crossfit really doesn't fit either though it would lean towards strength. It's style really isn't to develop strength but rather a skill(s). Once again we have to define strength here as well.
  • sgt1372sgt1372 Member Posts: 3,635 Member Member Posts: 3,635 Member
    Apples and oranges. Depends on you goals.

    FWIW, most (if not all) competitive powelifters are FAT and ALL competitive bodybuilders are not.
    edited September 4
  • jessef593jessef593 Member Posts: 2,281 Member Member Posts: 2,281 Member
    sgt1372 wrote: »
    Apples and oranges. Depends on you goals.

    FWIW, most (if not all) competitive powelifters are FAT and ALL competitive bodybuilders are not.

    Take a look a stefi Cohen and say that again Haha.

    I think you mean strongmen. Even they have acceptions
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,579 Member Member Posts: 8,579 Member
    sgt1372 wrote: »
    Apples and oranges. Depends on you goals.

    FWIW, most (if not all) competitive powelifters are FAT and ALL competitive bodybuilders are not.

    No maybe 50-60% of powerlifters have noticeable fat.

    There is a reason why there is is weight classes. 47kg is near pencil thin.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,579 Member Member Posts: 8,579 Member
    jessef593 wrote: »
    sgt1372 wrote: »
    Apples and oranges. Depends on you goals.

    FWIW, most (if not all) competitive powelifters are FAT and ALL competitive bodybuilders are not.

    Take a look a stefi Cohen and say that again Haha.

    I think you mean strongmen. Even they have acceptions

    Agreed. There is so many ripped powerlifters natural and geared its sick. If we are talking highest weight class I can can agree on fat.

    One guy I plan to compete against in a couple months is Christopher Thacker. Dude in 7-8 years start taking every record I have. He is mega jacked.
  • wiigelecwiigelec Member Posts: 307 Member Member Posts: 307 Member
    who do you think put on more mass:

    lifter a) benches 225 for multiple sets of 10-15 and eats carefully weighed chicken breasts

    lifter b) benches 350 for multiple sets of 10-15 and eats as much (or more) ground beef as possible in a sitting several times per day

    in general high level bodybuilders in big weight classes are powerlifter strong and eat tons of food.

    how much mass do you want to put on?
  • Mellouk89Mellouk89 Member Posts: 104 Member Member Posts: 104 Member
    Larry Wheels is strong as hell and he's lean. Question is, would he be even stronger if he gained some fat?
    edited September 5
  • sardelsasardelsa Member Posts: 9,637 Member Member Posts: 9,637 Member
    For me personally I run hypertrophy/bodybuilding style programs to put on mass.
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,686 MFP Moderator Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,686 MFP Moderator
    There is no reason you can't run periods or programs with both. It has helped a lot of bodybuilders put on mass. I know Layne Norton discussed how it helped him add like 4" to his legs.In my own training and experience, big lifts have aided in increasing isolation and accessory lifts.
    edited September 7
  • IronIsMyTherapyIronIsMyTherapy Member Posts: 198 Member Member Posts: 198 Member
    I enjoy powerbuilding. I want to look strong but I also like to BE strong. Colin Whitney has a great program; look him up.
  • billkansasbillkansas Member Posts: 251 Member Member Posts: 251 Member
    I was never able to stay motivated on bodybuilder programs. However, once I learned the thrill of 1-rep max type goals in squat, deadlift, and bench I found this exciting and motivational. This also started to encourage me to learn how to eat better too because I soon started hitting walls with my 1RM goals and wanted to figure out how to lift more. In the bodybuilding world my goals were a little too uncertain and always seemed beyond reach.
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