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Has a documentary ever influenced you to eat more plant based?

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Replies

  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    ZenDream wrote: »
    I stopped eating meat around 2011 although I still eat fish, eggs, and diary. As of late, I'm considering transitioning over to an entire plant based diet.

    Is this due to a specific documentary?
  • XxMinoXx
    XxMinoXx Posts: 9 Member
    I do not think that alarmism about the health consequences of animal products is a sustainable way to promote veganism.

    This. 100%.

    The best way to form your own opinion is to see all sides, and to do your research. I like watching some of those documentaries. They send me off on new avenues of learning, and I do eat a more plant-based diet because of the things I learned after watching them and doing my own research on the subject.

    I make my food choices based on Michael Pollan's three simple rules for eating... "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." If you can do that, weight loss dieting becomes a thing of the past and your choices will positively impact the environment while supporting local food producers. Win-win-win.
  • Mellouk89
    Mellouk89 Posts: 455 Member
    Not documentaries but I used to watch health and nutrition videos about veganism. I watched mostly Dr.McDougall, Michael Greger and other “experts” on the subject. While they sounded convincing, I don't see how I could apply all of that in my life. I have food intolerance to legumes, nuts, seeds and soy products. I would be very limited if I were to eat plant-based. On top of that I am not a very good cooker, or rather I have never learned how to cook properly.

    I don't even know what my meals would look like.
  • brianpperkins131
    brianpperkins131 Posts: 90 Member
    I find that foie gras tastes even better when one of the alarmist pseudo-documentaries from Netflix plays.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    XxMinoXx wrote: »
    I do not think that alarmism about the health consequences of animal products is a sustainable way to promote veganism.

    This. 100%.

    The best way to form your own opinion is to see all sides, and to do your research. I like watching some of those documentaries. They send me off on new avenues of learning, and I do eat a more plant-based diet because of the things I learned after watching them and doing my own research on the subject.

    I make my food choices based on Michael Pollan's three simple rules for eating... "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." If you can do that, weight loss dieting becomes a thing of the past and your choices will positively impact the environment while supporting local food producers. Win-win-win.

    To be fair, eating "not too much" of anything is just another way of describing weight loss dieting. "Too much" is, by definition, more than you need to sustain a healthy weight. The point is how we get there: for me, some form of conscious calorie control is necessary even when I'm eating plants exclusively.
  • amberellen12
    amberellen12 Posts: 248 Member
    Forks over Knives

    The China Study - book

    The Blue Zone

    Michael Pollan - 3 rules advice
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,582 Member
    edited November 2020
    figyello wrote: »
    Not a documentary, but Graham Hill's TED Talk about being a weekday vegetarian did motivate me to eat less meat. My family now eats vegetarian at least a couple days a week and it's not difficult. Eggplant parm instead of chicken, for example, and nobody even notices.

    Oh, I would notice...

    c66518a73dc2631e767c869f4e8df81a.png
  • angelexperiment
    angelexperiment Posts: 1,923 Member
    Yes it did. I did watch these and I went vegetarian for a year and vegan for a few months. I can’t sustain that type of diet long term. So I just try not to eat meat much if possible
  • robertw486
    robertw486 Posts: 2,342 Member
    None of them has really influenced my choices. "Documentaries" that are biased from the start are IMHO just as misleading as many of the voodoo doctors out there peddling woo. The whole picture is the whole picture.

    I do try to stay somewhat in touch with food sources and consequences. Small family farms die off due to lack of water and the worlds love for avocado's, but is that being reported by the plant based community? Likewise resource use of many foods, both plant and animal based, is just excessive. The impacts on the environment can be changed somewhat with food choices.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    figyello wrote: »
    Not a documentary, but Graham Hill's TED Talk about being a weekday vegetarian did motivate me to eat less meat. My family now eats vegetarian at least a couple days a week and it's not difficult. Eggplant parm instead of chicken, for example, and nobody even notices.

    Oh, I would notice...

    c66518a73dc2631e767c869f4e8df81a.png

    Even if you enjoy chicken AND eggplant, it's hard for me to imagine not being able to tell the difference between the two. They're completely different tastes and textures!
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    Yes it did. I did watch these and I went vegetarian for a year and vegan for a few months. I can’t sustain that type of diet long term. So I just try not to eat meat much if possible

    To be fair, from your post history you were also often attempting to layer in additional restrictions on top of the veganism, such as vegan keto. The more restrictions you layer on top, the more challenging veganism is going to be.

    There is a learning curve with figuring out how to create meals with just plants given how many of us learned to eat and create meals, but after that curve is passed, many people find it to be quite sustainable.
  • RashadLavelle
    RashadLavelle Posts: 46 Member
    The Game Changers influenced me. I tried it out, and had high blood pressure and gained weight and severe bloating. No more vegan for me. The documentary or movie was inspirational though, but it just didn't resonate with me when I tried it out.
  • NigelNi35
    NigelNi35 Posts: 53 Member
    It may have discouraged me as I found them to be moralistic and extreme. When I watched Colin Beaven's No Impact Man where he stopped driving cars, stopped subscribing to magazines, no longer eating out, and forced his wife to stop wearing makeup for a year, he came across as an green nut. When I used to watched those organic food documentaries on LINK TV, those vegans had a higher-than-thou behavior towards us meat-eaters, like Americans are killing Mother Earth when all I'm doing is ordering a burger at Carl's Jr. I don't want to have anything to do with people with such a narrow world view.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    NigelNi35 wrote: »
    It may have discouraged me as I found them to be moralistic and extreme. When I watched Colin Beaven's No Impact Man where he stopped driving cars, stopped subscribing to magazines, no longer eating out, and forced his wife to stop wearing makeup for a year, he came across as an green nut. When I used to watched those organic food documentaries on LINK TV, those vegans had a higher-than-thou behavior towards us meat-eaters, like Americans are killing Mother Earth when all I'm doing is ordering a burger at Carl's Jr. I don't want to have anything to do with people with such a narrow world view.

    Are you turned off by any suggestion that some acts may be preferable to others in their impact to other individuals and society as a whole or is this something that is exclusive to discussions of environmental impact and veganism?

    I ask because most people implement some kind of standard of behavior -- holding that one act can be kinder or more responsible or more just than another act. All vegans do is apply this relatively common assessment to behaviors that involve animals (and all environmentalists are doing is applying this relatively common assessment to behaviors that impact the health of the earth overall).
  • NigelNi35
    NigelNi35 Posts: 53 Member
    edited December 2020
    No, I am turned off by the suggestion that somehow I'm destroying the planet when I'm eating burgers and should feel ashamed of it. The principles of whether or not a person should eat meat is a moral one, not an environmental one. Some vegans pontificate that most Americans are destroying the planet when they don't put down that steak.

  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    NigelNi35 wrote: »
    No, I am turned off by the suggestion that somehow I'm destroying the planet when I'm eating burgers and should feel ashamed of it. The principles of eating or not eating meat is a moral one, not an environmental one. Some vegans do not apply this common assessment of behaviors and pontificate as though what most Americans are doing is destroying the planet when they don't put down that steak.

    So you're open to the argument that some actions are destructive to the earth and should be avoided, you just don't believe that eating factory farmed meat is one of those actions?

  • NigelNi35
    NigelNi35 Posts: 53 Member
    edited December 2020
    NigelNi35 wrote: »
    No, I am turned off by the suggestion that somehow I'm destroying the planet when I'm eating burgers and should feel ashamed of it. The principles of eating or not eating meat is a moral one, not an environmental one. Some vegans do not apply this common assessment of behaviors and pontificate as though what most Americans are doing is destroying the planet when they don't put down that steak.

    So you're open to the argument that some actions are destructive to the earth and should be avoided, you just don't believe that eating factory farmed meat is one of those actions?

    Most reputable scientists say there is no harmful threat to the environment to eating meat. Americans have been buying meat from Farmer John's, Jimmy Dean, John Morel, and Tyson Foods for decades without harming the planet.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    edited December 2020
    NigelNi35 wrote: »
    NigelNi35 wrote: »
    No, I am turned off by the suggestion that somehow I'm destroying the planet when I'm eating burgers and should feel ashamed of it. The principles of eating or not eating meat is a moral one, not an environmental one. Some vegans do not apply this common assessment of behaviors and pontificate as though what most Americans are doing is destroying the planet when they don't put down that steak.

    So you're open to the argument that some actions are destructive to the earth and should be avoided, you just don't believe that eating factory farmed meat is one of those actions?

    Most reputable scientists say there is no harmful threat to the environment to eating meat. Americans have been buying meat from Farmer John's, Jimmy Dean, John Morel, and Tyson Foods for decades without harming the planet.

    What is the source for the claim that "most reputable scientists" say that factory farming doesn't impact the environment? Was it some sort of survey?

    I think we can have a legitimate debate on to what extent humans can eat meat without harming the earth, but it's clear that many scientists -- including reputable ones -- agree that the current quantity of meat that we eat and the conditions in which factory farmed animals are living are having a negative impact on the environment.

    To be clear, not all scientists who are concerned about the environmental impact of factory farming agree that we need to eliminate meat eating. Some of them advocate for eating less meat, while others argue for different methods of meat production. But there is a widespread agreement among environmental scientists -- the ones who would be the experts here, not just generic scientists -- that factory farming does have a negative impact on the environment.

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2019/01/commission-report-great-food-transformation-plant-diet-climate-change/

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/may/31/avoiding-meat-and-dairy-is-single-biggest-way-to-reduce-your-impact-on-earth

    https://science.sciencemag.org/content/361/6399/eaam5324

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/01/upshot/beef-health-climate-impact.html

    https://earth.stanford.edu/news/qa-meat-health-and-environment

    I don't understand the argument that we've been doing this for decades and it hasn't had an impact. Are you denying that climate change is a real thing or are you arguing that it is caused exclusively by other factors?