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Has a documentary ever influenced you to eat more plant based?

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  • ZenDreamZenDream Member Posts: 205 Member Member Posts: 205 Member
    I stopped eating meat around 2011 although I still eat fish, eggs, and diary. As of late, I'm considering transitioning over to an entire plant based diet.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 24,291 Member Member Posts: 24,291 Member
    ZenDream wrote: »
    I stopped eating meat around 2011 although I still eat fish, eggs, and diary. As of late, I'm considering transitioning over to an entire plant based diet.

    Is this due to a specific documentary?
  • diaryofahaphazardhousewifediaryofahaphazardhousewife Member, Premium Posts: 1 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1 Member
    I've watched several, and I always walk away feeling very negatively towards the whole plant based way of eating. I know many of the things the docu-dramas present are untrue, exaggerated, or sensationalized so it makes me feel everything they are presenting is exaggerations or lies, but that's also false. So I stopped watching them. Instead I look for specifics.

    How are the animals I consume treated? How are the chickens or ducks that lay the eggs I eat treated? How was the cow/sheep/goat that produced the milk for my cheese/baking/butter treated? What about their offspring? Where does my produce come from? How did it get here? Were the farmers, workers, sales people, etc. paid a fair wage and treated fairly well? What land management is being used? What about the seeds and grains I eat?

    I think conscious consumption does more to guide people to more sustainable eating long term than scare tactics. I think open conversations about what and why people eat can make huge changes. Let people be flexible. Ease into it. Not only will their digestion be happier, they are more likely to keep pushing and expanding and feel encouraged.
  • XxMinoXxXxMinoXx Member, Premium Posts: 9 Member Member, Premium Posts: 9 Member
    I do not think that alarmism about the health consequences of animal products is a sustainable way to promote veganism.

    This. 100%.

    The best way to form your own opinion is to see all sides, and to do your research. I like watching some of those documentaries. They send me off on new avenues of learning, and I do eat a more plant-based diet because of the things I learned after watching them and doing my own research on the subject.

    I make my food choices based on Michael Pollan's three simple rules for eating... "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." If you can do that, weight loss dieting becomes a thing of the past and your choices will positively impact the environment while supporting local food producers. Win-win-win.
  • Mellouk89Mellouk89 Member Posts: 137 Member Member Posts: 137 Member
    Not documentaries but I used to watch health and nutrition videos about veganism. I watched mostly Dr.McDougall, Michael Greger and other “experts” on the subject. While they sounded convincing, I don't see how I could apply all of that in my life. I have food intolerance to legumes, nuts, seeds and soy products. I would be very limited if I were to eat plant-based. On top of that I am not a very good cooker, or rather I have never learned how to cook properly.

    I don't even know what my meals would look like.
  • brianpperkins131brianpperkins131 Member Posts: 70 Member Member Posts: 70 Member
    I find that foie gras tastes even better when one of the alarmist pseudo-documentaries from Netflix plays.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 24,291 Member Member Posts: 24,291 Member
    XxMinoXx wrote: »
    I do not think that alarmism about the health consequences of animal products is a sustainable way to promote veganism.

    This. 100%.

    The best way to form your own opinion is to see all sides, and to do your research. I like watching some of those documentaries. They send me off on new avenues of learning, and I do eat a more plant-based diet because of the things I learned after watching them and doing my own research on the subject.

    I make my food choices based on Michael Pollan's three simple rules for eating... "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." If you can do that, weight loss dieting becomes a thing of the past and your choices will positively impact the environment while supporting local food producers. Win-win-win.

    To be fair, eating "not too much" of anything is just another way of describing weight loss dieting. "Too much" is, by definition, more than you need to sustain a healthy weight. The point is how we get there: for me, some form of conscious calorie control is necessary even when I'm eating plants exclusively.
  • amberellen12amberellen12 Member, Premium Posts: 250 Member Member, Premium Posts: 250 Member
    Forks over Knives

    The China Study - book

    The Blue Zone

    Michael Pollan - 3 rules advice
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