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Why Is Food "Addiction" So Controversial?

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  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 24,052 Member Member Posts: 24,052 Member
    Yeah, I tend to mostly agree with janejellyroll - and "Bright Line Eating" is an effective program for some people but it is super restrictive and has a lot of arbitrary "RULES."

    I tend to rebel against rules. I did grow up in the sixties, so I'm claiming demographics. :lol: I'm not a fan of the Abstinence Model when it comes to food. Alcohol, yes. Cereal? No.

    That said, I have a definite problem with some sweets - and if they have flour in them, all's more the peril for me.

    I can control them mostly. I'm not willing to never eat flour or sweets again so I had to come up with alternate tools and personal boundaries. That for me means I don't buy ice cream unless I accept that the whole container (no matter the size) will be eaten entirely by me before I go to bed. Same with French Bread. However, I can have a package of regular whole wheat bread or English muffins and dole them out one-a-day. If I buy trail mix a 12 ounce bag will be gone in one day, but if I buy packs of raisins and packs of mixed nuts I can dole them out in reasonable portions. So it's not the wheat, sugar, or even one ingredient, it's the yumminess combination of certain foods for me. It's may possibly be more psychological than physical but it's complicated and I'll likely never figure it out completely.

    I just know what to avoid after many years of experimenting.

    I borrowed "Bright Line Eating" from the library after seeing it mentioned here. I'm not taking a stand on the science, but found the author's conclusions on how to apply the science dubious.

    Her rules may be very helpful for some, but I found the tone way too One True Way for me.
    edited June 8
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member, Premium Posts: 25,741 Member Member, Premium Posts: 25,741 Member
    Yeah, I tend to mostly agree with janejellyroll - and "Bright Line Eating" is an effective program for some people but it is super restrictive and has a lot of arbitrary "RULES."


    I tend to rebel against rules. I did grow up in the sixties, so I'm claiming demographics. :lol: I'm not a fan of the Abstinence Model when it comes to food. Alcohol, yes. Cereal? No.

    That said, I have a definite problem with some sweets - and if they have flour in them, all's more the peril for me.


    I can control them mostly. I'm not willing to never eat flour or sweets again so I had to come up with alternate tools and personal boundaries. That for me means I don't buy ice cream unless I accept that the whole container (no matter the size) will be eaten entirely by me before I go to bed. Same with French Bread. However, I can have a package of regular whole wheat bread or English muffins and dole them out one-a-day. If I buy trail mix a 12 ounce bag will be gone in one day, but if I buy packs of raisins and packs of mixed nuts I can dole them out in reasonable portions. So it's not the wheat, sugar, or even one ingredient, it's the yumminess combination of certain foods for me. It's may possibly be more psychological than physical but it's complicated and I'll likely never figure it out completely.

    I just know what to avoid after many years of experimenting.

    Yes, for me personally, "Bright Line Eating" would trigger my disordered eating. Any form of "you can't have [x]" isn't feasible for me (which is funny, as I have no problems with veganism . . . but that's a whole other thought process). That doesn't mean it won't work for others.

    There is stuff I rarely bring in my house because I know it will be a struggle for me, but it's a whole different mental path. I know I can have crackers whenever I want, I just choose not to most of the time. This is virtually stress free for me. If I determined I wouldn't ever have crackers again, I don't know if I could make it six hours before I was in a store parking lot shoving full sleeves of Ritz crackers into my face. By telling myself "Maybe tomorrow," I have crackers maybe twice a year and in normal quantities.

    (Note: This is me joking about my personal experiences with disordered eating, absolutely not poking fun at anyone else).

    Trail mix! If it's just salty or just sweet, it will probably go bad before I eat it. If it's salty and sweet, watch out.

  • cmriversidecmriverside Member Posts: 31,444 Member Member Posts: 31,444 Member
    Yeah, I tend to mostly agree with janejellyroll - and "Bright Line Eating" is an effective program for some people but it is super restrictive and has a lot of arbitrary "RULES."


    I tend to rebel against rules. I did grow up in the sixties, so I'm claiming demographics. :lol: I'm not a fan of the Abstinence Model when it comes to food. Alcohol, yes. Cereal? No.

    That said, I have a definite problem with some sweets - and if they have flour in them, all's more the peril for me.


    I can control them mostly. I'm not willing to never eat flour or sweets again so I had to come up with alternate tools and personal boundaries. That for me means I don't buy ice cream unless I accept that the whole container (no matter the size) will be eaten entirely by me before I go to bed. Same with French Bread. However, I can have a package of regular whole wheat bread or English muffins and dole them out one-a-day. If I buy trail mix a 12 ounce bag will be gone in one day, but if I buy packs of raisins and packs of mixed nuts I can dole them out in reasonable portions. So it's not the wheat, sugar, or even one ingredient, it's the yumminess combination of certain foods for me. It's may possibly be more psychological than physical but it's complicated and I'll likely never figure it out completely.

    I just know what to avoid after many years of experimenting.

    Yes, for me personally, "Bright Line Eating" would trigger my disordered eating. Any form of "you can't have [x]" isn't feasible for me (which is funny, as I have no problems with veganism . . . but that's a whole other thought process). That doesn't mean it won't work for others.

    There is stuff I rarely bring in my house because I know it will be a struggle for me, but it's a whole different mental path. I know I can have crackers whenever I want, I just choose not to most of the time. This is virtually stress free for me. If I determined I wouldn't ever have crackers again, I don't know if I could make it six hours before I was in a store parking lot shoving full sleeves of Ritz crackers into my face. By telling myself "Maybe tomorrow," I have crackers maybe twice a year and in normal quantities.

    (Note: This is me joking about my personal experiences with disordered eating, absolutely not poking fun at anyone else).

    Trail mix! If it's just salty or just sweet, it will probably go bad before I eat it. If it's salty and sweet, watch out.

    I really did lol at the parking lot visual.

    Been there.

    I'm not sure exactly why certain wheat crunchiness is okay with me but other wheat crunchiness isn't. For instance, I have never, will never, have never wanted to purchase Ritz crackers. But give me a box of Triscuits and, "Holy crap, I could have sworn I bought a full box, dunno why it's empty when I got home from the grocery." And not to be all elitist/whole wheat only-est - I would eat a full sleeve of regular unsalted Saltines without taking a breath, too. It's not the actual ingredient of flour nor the crunchiness.


    I don't particularly like chocolate, and chocolate candies aren't my thing at all - BUT. There is one candy made by a big manufacturer that I would eat the whole bag of bite-sized ones if they were refrigerated first. Warm? I'll have a couple and be good because they taste too salty to me warm. Full size bars? I'll eat one and not care about any more.

    Weird.


    That's why I suspect it's some deep childhood psychology at work that I haven't uncovered.

  • Speakeasy76Speakeasy76 Member Posts: 649 Member Member Posts: 649 Member
    Yeah, I tend to mostly agree with janejellyroll - and "Bright Line Eating" is an effective program for some people but it is super restrictive and has a lot of arbitrary "RULES."


    I tend to rebel against rules. I did grow up in the sixties, so I'm claiming demographics. :lol: I'm not a fan of the Abstinence Model when it comes to food. Alcohol, yes. Cereal? No.

    That said, I have a definite problem with some sweets - and if they have flour in them, all's more the peril for me.


    I can control them mostly. I'm not willing to never eat flour or sweets again so I had to come up with alternate tools and personal boundaries. That for me means I don't buy ice cream unless I accept that the whole container (no matter the size) will be eaten entirely by me before I go to bed. Same with French Bread. However, I can have a package of regular whole wheat bread or English muffins and dole them out one-a-day. If I buy trail mix a 12 ounce bag will be gone in one day, but if I buy packs of raisins and packs of mixed nuts I can dole them out in reasonable portions. So it's not the wheat, sugar, or even one ingredient, it's the yumminess combination of certain foods for me. It's may possibly be more psychological than physical but it's complicated and I'll likely never figure it out completely.

    I just know what to avoid after many years of experimenting.

    Yes, for me personally, "Bright Line Eating" would trigger my disordered eating. Any form of "you can't have [x]" isn't feasible for me (which is funny, as I have no problems with veganism . . . but that's a whole other thought process). That doesn't mean it won't work for others.

    There is stuff I rarely bring in my house because I know it will be a struggle for me, but it's a whole different mental path. I know I can have crackers whenever I want, I just choose not to most of the time. This is virtually stress free for me. If I determined I wouldn't ever have crackers again, I don't know if I could make it six hours before I was in a store parking lot shoving full sleeves of Ritz crackers into my face. By telling myself "Maybe tomorrow," I have crackers maybe twice a year and in normal quantities.

    (Note: This is me joking about my personal experiences with disordered eating, absolutely not poking fun at anyone else).

    Trail mix! If it's just salty or just sweet, it will probably go bad before I eat it. If it's salty and sweet, watch out.

    Yep this is pretty much how I've handled foods that I tend to overeat. My mindset is I can have it anytime I want, but do I really want to? Like you said, there are still foods that can be difficult for me to just stop or I'll want to keep going back to, but it's not like how it used to be.

    I've been on an elimination diet since beginning of April (currently in the 4th phase). It IS a different mindset of not being able to eat --one, because I knew it was temporary and two--it was for my health, and not for weight loss. In the process, I've discovered I am sensitive to corn and as much as I thought this was just a "trend," sensitive to gluten. Any amount of alcohol (only allowed vodka, and have only had a few cocktails) triggers joint and muscle issues. Now that I know this, I'm really bummed, but am not tempted to eat things that contain those ingredients. I still can and probably will at times, but now there will be consequences. If I had to do it for weight loss only, though, nope...no way!

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