Myfitnesspal

Message Boards Debate: Health and Fitness
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

1980s definatly, and back..Why were people more fit, toned and healthy Looking?

1679111214

Replies

  • sdailly13sdailly13 Member Posts: 36 Member Member Posts: 36 Member
    Ready made meals, Huge supermarkets taking over the local smaller butchers, fishmongers etc where you planned what you were buying in each shop for your weekly food needs. Technology was becoming a regular pastime. Eating out was no longer a treat but the norm. I could go on but you get my meaning. And as always the poorest people suffered the worst in this changing society.
  • MsCzarMsCzar Member Posts: 567 Member Member Posts: 567 Member
    Wait, the answer’s cocaine right?

    That's what I said back when this thread was started. Chances were, those thin bodies on TV, in magazines and in films reflected a the acceptance of cocaine use as a chic thing to do. I remember attending a posh wedding back in the day where every table had a 'special' centerpiece decorated with colorful straws. Whenever I watch old episodes of 'Love Boat' or any of those 80's shows, there is no shortage of very thin women and energetic-looking men. "Fitness" is not the first thing that springs to mind.

  • corinasue1143corinasue1143 Member Posts: 5,814 Member Member Posts: 5,814 Member
    Again in the 50s, our tv was a 9-inch black and white with poor reception. It’s the only one I ever saw like it, except in pictures. All my friends families had larger color TVs. We got a big color tv when I was 12 or 13?
  • Speakeasy76Speakeasy76 Member Posts: 810 Member Member Posts: 810 Member
    I'm an 80's kid and not only do I clearly remember having a boatload of unhealthy snacks in the house, but we also had cable TV AND video game systems and computer games. I definitely played outside a lot when I was younger, but as we got older our activities became more and more sedentary.

    Ironically, my mom has never struggled with her weight..or at least not that I was aware of.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 2,078 Member Member Posts: 2,078 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    MsCzar wrote: »
    I was
    So, so many snacks.

    Having an afternoon snack right after school was a solid tradition. We lived near a Hostess Bakery outlet and boxes of Ho-ho's, Banana Flips, Snowballs and Zingers could be had for 50¢. We kids thought nothing of polishing off half a box in one go. Little Debbie apple cakes didn't last long either.

    Of course the activity after the snack was going outside and playing not sitting on a video game eating more snacks like now.

    Well, sometimes I'd have a snack and read a book or play with paper dolls or draw on the Etch-a-Sketch. Modern kids didn't invent sedentary hobbies. There probably are trends in physical activity that are relevant here, but I feel like this conversation overall is really flattening out differences and assuming an experience of 1980s life that is not necessarily accurate.

    Agreed.

    I also feel like it's treating the 80s like it was a million years ago and an entirely different world.

    No.

    We had prepackaged snacks. Video games. Television/cable. EVEN ELECTRICITY AND INDOOR PLUMBING.

    I have to admit, my comment were from a point of view of a child growing up in the 60's and 70's so not video games (maybe someone that was rich had a Pong at their house, other than that late 70's video games were at an arcade or bar). TV consisted of 3 networks plus an educational and independent station. TV geared to kids was mainly Saturday mornings. Cable was the early 1980's.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 25,873 Member Member Posts: 25,873 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    MsCzar wrote: »
    I was
    So, so many snacks.

    Having an afternoon snack right after school was a solid tradition. We lived near a Hostess Bakery outlet and boxes of Ho-ho's, Banana Flips, Snowballs and Zingers could be had for 50¢. We kids thought nothing of polishing off half a box in one go. Little Debbie apple cakes didn't last long either.

    Of course the activity after the snack was going outside and playing not sitting on a video game eating more snacks like now.

    Well, sometimes I'd have a snack and read a book or play with paper dolls or draw on the Etch-a-Sketch. Modern kids didn't invent sedentary hobbies. There probably are trends in physical activity that are relevant here, but I feel like this conversation overall is really flattening out differences and assuming an experience of 1980s life that is not necessarily accurate.

    Yeah. It's almost starting to feel like that other debate thread a while back - I think it was about how people lost weight before calorie counting, or something like that - in which one guy asserted that people couldn't lose weight in the 1960s, because we didn't know about calories yet. 🙄

    1980s: Outdoor play only, no snacks, ubiquitous cocaine, back before supermarkets. Jeez.

    In popular culture it feels like the 1980s have already been wrapped up in the blanket of a cuddly "idealized past." The things perceived as their fears and concerns are painted as quaint, things that trouble people today are perceived as working well then.

    Kids were really kids then, women were really women, food was really food, eating out was always special, etc.
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 9,137 Member Member Posts: 9,137 Member
    Again in the 50s, our tv was a 9-inch black and white with poor reception. It’s the only one I ever saw like it, except in pictures. All my friends families had larger color TVs. We got a big color tv when I was 12 or 13?

    We had two or three of those in the house during the 70s/80s -- they were freebies/inticements for opening new accounts at some financial institution.
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 9,137 Member Member Posts: 9,137 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    MsCzar wrote: »
    I was
    So, so many snacks.

    Having an afternoon snack right after school was a solid tradition. We lived near a Hostess Bakery outlet and boxes of Ho-ho's, Banana Flips, Snowballs and Zingers could be had for 50¢. We kids thought nothing of polishing off half a box in one go. Little Debbie apple cakes didn't last long either.

    Of course the activity after the snack was going outside and playing not sitting on a video game eating more snacks like now.

    Well, sometimes I'd have a snack and read a book or play with paper dolls or draw on the Etch-a-Sketch. Modern kids didn't invent sedentary hobbies. There probably are trends in physical activity that are relevant here, but I feel like this conversation overall is really flattening out differences and assuming an experience of 1980s life that is not necessarily accurate.

    Yeah. It's almost starting to feel like that other debate thread a while back - I think it was about how people lost weight before calorie counting, or something like that - in which one guy asserted that people couldn't lose weight in the 1960s, because we didn't know about calories yet. 🙄

    1980s: Outdoor play only, no snacks, ubiquitous cocaine, back before supermarkets. Jeez.

    In popular culture it feels like the 1980s have already been wrapped up in the blanket of a cuddly "idealized past." The things perceived as their fears and concerns are painted as quaint, things that trouble people today are perceived as working well then.

    Kids were really kids then, women were really women, food was really food, eating out was always special, etc.

    Girls were girls and men were men.
    Mister, we could use a man like Herbert Hoover again...

    ;-)


    Gee, our old LaSalle ran great. Those were the days.

    (when I was a kid, I always heard it as "Mystery could use a man like Herbert Hoover again." Very confusing. I thought Herbert Hoover was a movie detective like Sherlock Holmes or Charlie Chan.)
  • ythannahythannah Member Posts: 3,912 Member Member Posts: 3,912 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    MsCzar wrote: »
    I was
    So, so many snacks.

    Having an afternoon snack right after school was a solid tradition. We lived near a Hostess Bakery outlet and boxes of Ho-ho's, Banana Flips, Snowballs and Zingers could be had for 50¢. We kids thought nothing of polishing off half a box in one go. Little Debbie apple cakes didn't last long either.

    Of course the activity after the snack was going outside and playing not sitting on a video game eating more snacks like now.

    Well, sometimes I'd have a snack and read a book or play with paper dolls or draw on the Etch-a-Sketch. Modern kids didn't invent sedentary hobbies. There probably are trends in physical activity that are relevant here, but I feel like this conversation overall is really flattening out differences and assuming an experience of 1980s life that is not necessarily accurate.

    Agreed.

    I also feel like it's treating the 80s like it was a million years ago and an entirely different world.

    No.

    We had prepackaged snacks. Video games. Television/cable. EVEN ELECTRICITY AND INDOOR PLUMBING.

    I have to admit, my comment were from a point of view of a child growing up in the 60's and 70's so not video games (maybe someone that was rich had a Pong at their house, other than that late 70's video games were at an arcade or bar). TV consisted of 3 networks plus an educational and independent station. TV geared to kids was mainly Saturday mornings. Cable was the early 1980's.

    That's what I remember too. Twelve or thirteen channels, although more than two required a cable subscription where I lived. You got up to change the channel or adjust the volume in my house. I think corded remote controls might have been a thing in other people's houses. Space Invaders was an arcade game in the very early 80s but pinball machines outnumbered computer-style games.
  • wunderkindkingwunderkindking Member Posts: 1,194 Member Member Posts: 1,194 Member
    ythannah wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    MsCzar wrote: »
    I was
    So, so many snacks.

    Having an afternoon snack right after school was a solid tradition. We lived near a Hostess Bakery outlet and boxes of Ho-ho's, Banana Flips, Snowballs and Zingers could be had for 50¢. We kids thought nothing of polishing off half a box in one go. Little Debbie apple cakes didn't last long either.

    Of course the activity after the snack was going outside and playing not sitting on a video game eating more snacks like now.

    Well, sometimes I'd have a snack and read a book or play with paper dolls or draw on the Etch-a-Sketch. Modern kids didn't invent sedentary hobbies. There probably are trends in physical activity that are relevant here, but I feel like this conversation overall is really flattening out differences and assuming an experience of 1980s life that is not necessarily accurate.

    Agreed.

    I also feel like it's treating the 80s like it was a million years ago and an entirely different world.

    No.

    We had prepackaged snacks. Video games. Television/cable. EVEN ELECTRICITY AND INDOOR PLUMBING.

    I have to admit, my comment were from a point of view of a child growing up in the 60's and 70's so not video games (maybe someone that was rich had a Pong at their house, other than that late 70's video games were at an arcade or bar). TV consisted of 3 networks plus an educational and independent station. TV geared to kids was mainly Saturday mornings. Cable was the early 1980's.

    That's what I remember too. Twelve or thirteen channels, although more than two required a cable subscription where I lived. You got up to change the channel or adjust the volume in my house. I think corded remote controls might have been a thing in other people's houses. Space Invaders was an arcade game in the very early 80s but pinball machines outnumbered computer-style games.

    Atari was out in the late 70s - and not prohibitively expensive, albeit with just a few games. Nintendo was out with games aand popular by the mid 80s.
  • azukiazuki Member Posts: 38 Member Member Posts: 38 Member
    I would say the ease, cost, and availability of processed food skyrocketed since the 1980s.
  • Mellouk89Mellouk89 Member Posts: 319 Member Member Posts: 319 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    MsCzar wrote: »
    I was
    So, so many snacks.

    Having an afternoon snack right after school was a solid tradition. We lived near a Hostess Bakery outlet and boxes of Ho-ho's, Banana Flips, Snowballs and Zingers could be had for 50¢. We kids thought nothing of polishing off half a box in one go. Little Debbie apple cakes didn't last long either.

    Of course the activity after the snack was going outside and playing not sitting on a video game eating more snacks like now.

    I don't know when did this change occur but I grew up in the ealy 2000s and we were outside most of the time. We did play videogames but it was mostly at night, during the day we were doing stuff outside.

    I don't know what it's like today. I know it's more socially acceptable to be a gamer nowadays, but in my days it was looked down upon, kind of.
    edited June 3
  • claireychn074claireychn074 Member, Premium Posts: 567 Member Member, Premium Posts: 567 Member
    ythannah wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    MsCzar wrote: »
    I was
    So, so many snacks.

    Having an afternoon snack right after school was a solid tradition. We lived near a Hostess Bakery outlet and boxes of Ho-ho's, Banana Flips, Snowballs and Zingers could be had for 50¢. We kids thought nothing of polishing off half a box in one go. Little Debbie apple cakes didn't last long either.

    Of course the activity after the snack was going outside and playing not sitting on a video game eating more snacks like now.

    Well, sometimes I'd have a snack and read a book or play with paper dolls or draw on the Etch-a-Sketch. Modern kids didn't invent sedentary hobbies. There probably are trends in physical activity that are relevant here, but I feel like this conversation overall is really flattening out differences and assuming an experience of 1980s life that is not necessarily accurate.

    Agreed.

    I also feel like it's treating the 80s like it was a million years ago and an entirely different world.

    No.

    We had prepackaged snacks. Video games. Television/cable. EVEN ELECTRICITY AND INDOOR PLUMBING.

    I have to admit, my comment were from a point of view of a child growing up in the 60's and 70's so not video games (maybe someone that was rich had a Pong at their house, other than that late 70's video games were at an arcade or bar). TV consisted of 3 networks plus an educational and independent station. TV geared to kids was mainly Saturday mornings. Cable was the early 1980's.

    That's what I remember too. Twelve or thirteen channels, although more than two required a cable subscription where I lived. You got up to change the channel or adjust the volume in my house. I think corded remote controls might have been a thing in other people's houses. Space Invaders was an arcade game in the very early 80s but pinball machines outnumbered computer-style games.

    In the UK we had 3 channels - can’t remember when 4 came in but there was a LOT of excitement. Until we all worked out we didn’t have the reception (unless you lived in London) and went back to our VHS. Friday night was spent staring the videos in the local rental shop, hoping someone hadn’t taken the one copy of the film you wanted. TBH, living in a semi rural area, download speeds were so bad that we probably kept the rental business of films going 🤣
  • dolorsitdolorsit Member Posts: 92 Member Member Posts: 92 Member
    And no remote controls back then, well, not til later. Think of all the calories expended getting up to change to one of the other two channels.
Sign In or Register to comment.