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Going Vegan

solomonjon245solomonjon245 Member, Premium Posts: 9 Member Member, Premium Posts: 9 Member
Help I need some tips and recipes to try out. I am going from eating almost what ever to trying a Vegan diet for a week at first but may continue longer depending on the results I get after the week. Are there any good VEGAN resources out there??
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Replies

  • solomonjon245solomonjon245 Member, Premium Posts: 9 Member Member, Premium Posts: 9 Member
    Also how much protein should I consume daily to still get weight loss results? What are some good sources of protein beside tofu? I am slowly trying to add some of that to meals. I seem to be falling behind with the daily requirement for protein.
  • dragon_girl26dragon_girl26 Member Posts: 2,049 Member Member Posts: 2,049 Member
    I have seen one or two well know vegans on this site offer this website as a resource for getting proper nutrition:
    https://www.veganhealth.org
    edited February 23
  • srk369srk369 Member Posts: 263 Member Member Posts: 263 Member
    I'm not vegan, but I get a lot of plant based recipes from these sites...

    https://thevegan8.com
    https://www.badmanners.com
    https://cookieandkate.com
    https://ohsheglows.com
    and on youtube I know there is a ton of info, but I enjoy watching https://www.youtube.com/c/RainbowPlantLife/featured


  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member, Premium Posts: 24,817 Member Member, Premium Posts: 24,817 Member
    What results would you anticipate after a week? What do you think would generate those results?

    The above-mentioned veganhealth.org is a great resource for nutritional information. I've gotten a lot of good recipes from Pinterest.

    If you currently don't eat many fruits, vegetables, and legumes and you're switching to eating a lot more, you may notice some changes. That's not what veganism is though (although many vegans do eat a lot of fruits, vegetables, and legumes).

    High protein foods from plants include tofu, but also tempeh, seitan, and legumes. There are also some newer products based on things like pea protein. Vegans will supplement the protein from these sources with the protein that's already in foods like grains and vegetables.
  • solomonjon245solomonjon245 Member, Premium Posts: 9 Member Member, Premium Posts: 9 Member
    I watched a movie on Netflix ?The game changers" about athletes switching to a Vegan lifestyle and how that improved their health, energy and some experienced weight loss. I know I wont see results instantly or even within a week but I wanted to start with a small amount of time to just try eating Vegan.

    I am using the Vegan diet to simply try to increase my veggies and fruit intake with also trying to eliminate the extra calories that I eat with in my daily routine.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 18,776 Member Member, Premium Posts: 18,776 Member
    I watched a movie on Netflix ?The game changers" about athletes switching to a Vegan lifestyle and how that improved their health, energy and some experienced weight loss. I know I wont see results instantly or even within a week but I wanted to start with a small amount of time to just try eating Vegan.

    I am using the Vegan diet to simply try to increase my veggies and fruit intake with also trying to eliminate the extra calories that I eat with in my daily routine.

    "Game Changers" is an advocacy piece, not an actual impartial, balanced documentary. Read (or watch) some of the critiques by exercise science folks or registered dietitians, before believing every word of "Game Changers". Here are a couple of examples:

    https://dieteticallyspeaking.com/an-evidence-based-review-of-the-game-changers/
    https://www.biolayne.com/articles/research/the-game-changers-review-a-scientific-analysis/

    Google will show you lots more.

    Frankly, I find things like "Game Changers" really irritating: That kind of bias and misrepresentation makes all of us vegetarians and vegans look like science-misinterpreting idiots. Plant based eating is absolutely compatible with athletic achievement. I've been athletically active myself, including competing, while vegetarian. But there is no valid, balanced evidence that it's superior.

    Really, what are the odds that the best performance from the human body can be achieved by eating in a way that's different from the omnivorous conditions under which natural selection has influenced humans for centuries? There are lots of good reasons to reduce animal-food intake, or even to eliminate it entirely, but improved athletic performance doesn't loom large among them.

    If veganism were scientifically proven to improve performance, every trainer and coach of elite athletes would be pushing it, because it's their job to stay up on the science, and bring forward anything that will (at an elite level) trigger even small percentages of improvement. I've seen the eating guidelines for national team athletes in my sport, and even known some of those athletes. "Be vegan" is not on the list. (Some elites are vegetarian or vegan, and that's fine; but it's not specifically advocated by the trainers/dietitians/coaches for improvement purposes.)

    If you eat relatively minimal amounts of plant foods now, it will make sense to eat more plants. That can include some fully plant-based meals, but it can also include plant-forward meals with some meat as a protein source.

    Either way, I'd encourage you to make a gradual transition. That's not only a practical approach (because you need to learn about new foods and how to combine them for good well-rounded nutrition), it will also be more . . . comfortable.

    Someone who eats minimal plant foods, and goes straight to bunches of whole plant food all day every day, is likely to experience some form of digestive discomfort or distress. Your system is adapted to your current diet. Your gut microbiome is adapted to your current diet. If you suddenly eat very different foods, and muchMuch more fiber, it's very likely that you'll experience gassiness, possibly constipation, possibly diarrhea, etc. Gradual changes, really.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member, Premium Posts: 24,817 Member Member, Premium Posts: 24,817 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    I watched a movie on Netflix ?The game changers" about athletes switching to a Vegan lifestyle and how that improved their health, energy and some experienced weight loss. I know I wont see results instantly or even within a week but I wanted to start with a small amount of time to just try eating Vegan.

    I am using the Vegan diet to simply try to increase my veggies and fruit intake with also trying to eliminate the extra calories that I eat with in my daily routine.

    "Game Changers" is an advocacy piece, not an actual impartial, balanced documentary. Read (or watch) some of the critiques by exercise science folks or registered dietitians, before believing every word of "Game Changers". Here are a couple of examples:

    https://dieteticallyspeaking.com/an-evidence-based-review-of-the-game-changers/
    https://www.biolayne.com/articles/research/the-game-changers-review-a-scientific-analysis/

    Google will show you lots more.

    Frankly, I find things like "Game Changers" really irritating: That kind of bias and misrepresentation makes all of us vegetarians and vegans look like science-misinterpreting idiots. Plant based eating is absolutely compatible with athletic achievement. I've been athletically active myself, including competing, while vegetarian. But there is no valid, balanced evidence that it's superior.

    Really, what are the odds that the best performance from the human body can be achieved by eating in a way that's different from the omnivorous conditions under which natural selection has influenced humans for centuries? There are lots of good reasons to reduce animal-food intake, or even to eliminate it entirely, but improved athletic performance doesn't loom large among them.

    If veganism were scientifically proven to improve performance, every trainer and coach of elite athletes would be pushing it, because it's their job to stay up on the science, and bring forward anything that will (at an elite level) trigger even small percentages of improvement. I've seen the eating guidelines for national team athletes in my sport, and even known some of those athletes. "Be vegan" is not on the list. (Some elites are vegetarian or vegan, and that's fine; but it's not specifically advocated by the trainers/dietitians/coaches for improvement purposes.)

    If you eat relatively minimal amounts of plant foods now, it will make sense to eat more plants. That can include some fully plant-based meals, but it can also include plant-forward meals with some meat as a protein source.

    Either way, I'd encourage you to make a gradual transition. That's not only a practical approach (because you need to learn about new foods and how to combine them for good well-rounded nutrition), it will also be more . . . comfortable.

    Someone who eats minimal plant foods, and goes straight to bunches of whole plant food all day every day, is likely to experience some form of digestive discomfort or distress. Your system is adapted to your current diet. Your gut microbiome is adapted to your current diet. If you suddenly eat very different foods, and muchMuch more fiber, it's very likely that you'll experience gassiness, possibly constipation, possibly diarrhea, etc. Gradual changes, really.

    Yes, it's beyond frustrating to have veganism associated with this type of manipulative and misleading advocacy.

    OP, the above about potential digestive distress is real. Since some non-vegans don't consume as much fiber/plants as some vegans, it is a relatively common experience for some newer vegans to experience bloating, flatulence, or discomfort as a result of the switch. This doesn't mean your body can't digest more fiber or plants, it's just a sign that you'll want to increase your fiber intake more gradually.
  • CaralarmaCaralarma Member Posts: 159 Member Member Posts: 159 Member
    Veganism should ONLY be done for ethical reasons. There is literally no other reason to eat that way. Weight loss is about calories and even from a health perspective, veganism actually makes it harder to get protein into your diet. Many vegans are actually not healthy and my vegan friend has gained weight over the years since she went vegan. As I said... if you are doing it for ethical reasons then go ahead but if it's too be healthier or lose weight then no.
  • rosebarnalicerosebarnalice Member Posts: 3,078 Member Member Posts: 3,078 Member
    For protein, I eat a lot of hummus, beans and lentils. I like to eat beans and lentils oover julienned cabbage instead of rice or noodles, but I also love to mash them and make salad dressing out of them. Mashed red beans and bit of flavored basalmic vinegar makes a great protein-boist dressing; or leftover curried lentils, a bit of mango chutney and a some lime juice
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member, Premium Posts: 6,765 Member Member, Premium Posts: 6,765 Member
    I watched a movie on Netflix ?The game changers" about athletes switching to a Vegan lifestyle and how that improved their health, energy and some experienced weight loss. I know I wont see results instantly or even within a week but I wanted to start with a small amount of time to just try eating Vegan.

    I am using the Vegan diet to simply try to increase my veggies and fruit intake with also trying to eliminate the extra calories that I eat with in my daily routine.

    What Ann and Jane said.

    To add to this, even if you want to become a 100% plant-based eater (the health claims are really about WFPB diets, not veganism, which can be WFPB, but is simply an ethical position that goes beyond food choices, and can be a healthy or not healthy way to eat depending on how the person chooses to eat, as with non vegan diets), you will likely be more successful if you make the changes more gradual and sustainable.

    I personally believe that the benefits of the WFPB diet is not excluding meat, eggs, and dairy (although that can be an admirable ethical choice, and I respect those who see it as ethically necessary), but the fact that one eats a lot of nutrient-dense whole foods, especially vegetables, lots of fiber, some healthy sources of fat, and the diet is much more balanced than one overloaded with added sugar and added fat, as many US diets are.

    But what I would recommend as a start is take stock of what you are eating now and of ways to reduce cals easily and add more vegetables and fruit and other missing nutrients, perhaps.

    If you aren't used to meals based around vegetarian sources of protein, I'd practice with that too. If you post some current typical breakfast/lunch/dinners or snacks (if you have them and want to continue), we could probably suggest some ways to make them more nutrient dense and reduce the animal products in your overall day.

    If your dinners tend to be based around meat, explore other options.

    There are tons of vegan websites with good recipes, and even reputable youtubers (a lot of vegan youtube channels are questionable in the advice given, but not all). I enjoy watching people cook on youtube (I get inspiration), and some good vegan ones are Pick Up Limes, Cheap Lazy Vegan, avantgardevegan, and the Happy Pear. There are also tons of great vegan cookbooks which one can try out by getting them from a library, and Matt Frazier at Nomeatathlete has a bunch of beginning resources and even a "going plant-based gradually" plan, I believe.

    But that aside, I do want to stress that it's simply not true that one can only be healthy or energetic with a WFPB way of eating (as suggested by The Game Changers) or that it will magically cause amazing health effects to cut out meat.

    Eating a better and more plant-based diet is a great choice, IMO, however.
  • DezYaoifiedDezYaoified Member Posts: 88 Member Member Posts: 88 Member
    Help I need some tips and recipes to try out. I am going from eating almost what ever to trying a Vegan diet for a week at first but may continue longer depending on the results I get after the week. Are there any good VEGAN resources out there??

    My best friend went vegetarian for medical reasons. Since she was a kid she wasn’t able to digest red meat, then in her late teens/early twenties she started having problems with poultry.

    She did lose weight, but she also did IF at the same time so I’m not sure which was the biggest factor.

    I know frozen meals have a bad reputation on here but Amy’s has some good tasting options. Especially if you want to start going vegan or vegetarian one or two days a week to build up. She prefers the Garden brand over Morning Star. And I think it’s Birdseye has the cauliflower buffalo wings, so yummy.

    I tried it for 2 months, just to support her, but not only was I not getting the protein I needed, I also wasn’t getting enough iron. It just wasn’t something I was able to keep up, and not something I wanted to. I do still eat several vegetarian meals.

    May not be the advise you were looking for, but I figured a little support wouldn’t hurt considering how aggressive some people get on this topic.
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 2,360 Member Member Posts: 2,360 Member
    nomeatathlete.com
    veganliftz.com
    greatveganathletes.com

    There are many more if you're gearing it toward wondering how vegan athletes do it. I'm not vegan, but I know some world class athletes that are. I also know some that eat tons of meat.
  • hesn92hesn92 Member Posts: 5,882 Member Member Posts: 5,882 Member
    I like minimalist baker (blog) and rainbow plant life (youtube and blog). I eat mostly plant based. I eat lots of beans and grains like rice, quinoa and farro. Obviously lots of veg. I tend to just throw *kitten* together and call it a salad which I eat every day for lunch because I'm boring (my husband makes fun of me for it.) but salads are a good and easy way to throw whatever you like in there to make it a filling and balanced meal. I just make sure to add a grain and protein. Lots of meals you can make vegan... stir fry, fried rice, lots of soups, chili, tacos/nachos/quesadillas, curries...
    edited February 26
  • XierraxXierrax Member Posts: 18 Member Member Posts: 18 Member
    Heyy!

    I'm not a vegan although would like to be some day. Like you, I've seen vegan/plant-based documentaries and read books and think it's a great way to live and without being an expert, I've read a number of papers in which a balanced vegan diet seems to be healthier in the long term. As such I wish you all the best with your journey! There's no harm in trying!

    If you are on Reddit /r/veganrecipes and /veganfoodporn have provided me with countless amazing recipes. I don't follow a specific blog per se though.

    My current go-to is bean tacos with chickpea guacamole - literally just cooked black beans (w/ salt, cumin, turmeric or whatever spices you like) in a heated and folded tortilla and vegan cheese. For the guacamole I just mix an avocado with a few chickpeas and season it with salt and lime.

    I also like to cook a lot of Chinese food in which I substitute the meat either for tofu or mushrooms, there is vegan soy sauce/oyster sauce out there if that helps too!
  • nytrifisoulnytrifisoul Member Posts: 486 Member Member Posts: 486 Member
    I wouldn't go straight to vegan. I would start taking out some proteins like beef, pork, poultry. Keep healthier proteins like Fish in your diet. Then eventually work your way to Vegetarian, then Vegan. But take my advice with a grain of salt. I am a huge carnivore. There's proteins out there i would eat if they were legal...
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member, Premium Posts: 24,817 Member Member, Premium Posts: 24,817 Member
    I wouldn't go straight to vegan. I would start taking out some proteins like beef, pork, poultry. Keep healthier proteins like Fish in your diet. Then eventually work your way to Vegetarian, then Vegan. But take my advice with a grain of salt. I am a huge carnivore. There's proteins out there i would eat if they were legal...

    There's really no evidence that there's a benefit to "tapering off" meat consumption and then eventually eliminating the rest of the animal products in your diet.

    That isn't to say that it might not be the best approach logistically or emotionally for some individuals -- people tend to vary in how they like to make lifestyle changes or form new habits. But from a nutritional or health point of view, I'm not aware of any evidence showing that there are better health outcomes associated with a gradual transition.

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