Myfitnesspal

Message Boards Goal: Gaining Weight and Body Building
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

What dose everyone think about the 5x5

nygator06nygator06 Member Posts: 22 Member Member Posts: 22 Member
Hello everyone I am down 60 plus pound . I am 42 just joined a gym . I have been doing 5 miles a day walking and riding my bike since the beginning of the year . My question is this the best work out for someone that hasn’t been to a gym in 10 years . Just wanna tighten up. Also my time is some what limited because of kids . Thank you all .
«1

Replies

  • DoubleG2DoubleG2 Member Posts: 53 Member Member Posts: 53 Member
    nygator06 wrote: »
    Hello everyone I am down 60 plus pound . I am 42 just joined a gym . I have been doing 5 miles a day walking and riding my bike since the beginning of the year . My question is this the best work out for someone that hasn’t been to a gym in 10 years . Just wanna tighten up. Also my time is some what limited because of kids . Thank you all .

    Congrats on the weight loss!
    5X5 is a solid starting program. There are also other options here:
    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10332083/which-lifting-program-is-the-best-for-you/p1

    We all begin somewhere...consistency and patience is key.
    edited April 9
  • nygator06nygator06 Member Posts: 22 Member Member Posts: 22 Member
    Thanks for the reply will look into that right now .
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,832 Member Member Posts: 8,832 Member
    No it isn't appropriate for someone untrained and certainly isn't "the best" program for said person.

    Too much volume, no autoregulation, starting intensity is too low for most as far as a working set.

    That being said if you want to and 5×5 SL is the only program you can see yourself adhearing to then go for it. There is just better options for most people, but its fine as long as you don't run the grindyness of deloading and thinking you will develop strength gains within that program specifically.
    edited April 9
  • PAV8888PAV8888 Member Posts: 7,937 Member Member Posts: 7,937 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    No it isn't appropriate for someone untrained and certainly isn't "the best" program for said person.

    Too much volume, no autoregulation, starting intensity is too low for most as far as a working set.

    That being said if you want to and 5×5 SL is the only program you can see yourself adhearing to then go for it. There is just better options for most people, but its fine as long as you don't run the grindyness of deloading and thinking you will develop strength gains within that program specifically.

    so... which one would you suggest for the multitudes of us who at some point of time during weight loss decide that NOW is the time to drag our totally untrained, and probably not totally young, selves into some sort of strength building? AND, of course, with no effort what-so-ever, build all the nice visible muscles you have....

    so realistically and no matter what we ask... the answer would be a program that secures functional strength and would then continue on towards pushing some hypertrophy as time goes on...

    Not surprisingly I see another thread on "maximum results with minimal effort"; hey, that's what we all want until and unless we're bit by a bug :wink:
    edited April 9
  • davew0000davew0000 Member Posts: 85 Member Member Posts: 85 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    No it isn't appropriate for someone untrained and certainly isn't "the best" program for said person.

    Too much volume, no autoregulation, starting intensity is too low for most as far as a working set.

    That being said if you want to and 5×5 SL is the only program you can see yourself adhearing to then go for it. There is just better options for most people, but its fine as long as you don't run the grindyness of deloading and thinking you will develop strength gains within that program specifically.

    Hi Chief,

    Which would you recommend? I’m following Bigger Leaner Stronger (this first program I picked up).

  • wiigelecwiigelec Member Posts: 481 Member Member Posts: 481 Member
  • nygator06nygator06 Member Posts: 22 Member Member Posts: 22 Member
    Tonight was my first night at the gym . Was my first night of 5x5 . I think it went well . We will see how I feel tomorrow 😳
  • sgt1372sgt1372 Member Posts: 3,878 Member Member Posts: 3,878 Member
    5x5 is a simple starter program that I used for awhile.

    It's easy to follow but can redult in injury for a novice who pushes the wt up too fast. At least that's what happened to me.

    And, if you follow the program diligently, you will probably reach the end of its usefulness after only 3-4 months (6months max).

    Then you'll need to transition to an intermediate program to advance further.
  • nygator06nygator06 Member Posts: 22 Member Member Posts: 22 Member
    I didn’t push myself on my first day and I don’t see myself really pushing myself hard for the first few weeks . Been reading that it was a good starting point.
  • cupcakesandproteinshakescupcakesandproteinshakes Member Posts: 844 Member Member Posts: 844 Member
    OP: You didn’t give us much info to go on. Like how much time you have to commmit to training and how many sessions a week you can train for example. I’m not sure what you mean by tightening up. It means different things to different people. I think I’m quite flabby atm because I haven’t had access to a gym. Others might look at me and say I look quite muscular.

    A good recommendation for newbies to resistance training is barbell medicine beginners prescription It’s free. They have a paid beginners programme too but the beginners prescription is free.
  • nygator06nygator06 Member Posts: 22 Member Member Posts: 22 Member
    At this point in my life I think I could do near every other day before I come home from work . I also think I am flabby. I would like to make myself less flabby .
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 44,889 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 44,889 Member
    Get a trainer. If you've not worked out, how do you know your form is right? Or that execution is done correctly? With all my new clients, I start them on a simple full body training program that is usually only 2 sets so their body can get accustomed to exercise.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • nygator06nygator06 Member Posts: 22 Member Member Posts: 22 Member
    Thanks will look into a trainer .
  • FitAgainBy55FitAgainBy55 Member Posts: 179 Member Member Posts: 179 Member
    I personally like Stronglifts 5x5 because of the simplicity. I transitioned from a somewhat complex super-setting type strength training program to a 5x5 "like" program. I didn't follow it as the program is designed, I just incorporated what I liked from it.

    I did all 5 lifts on the same day. I was already 'trained' when I started, so I started at around 80% of my 1RM. I also supplemented it with some of my favorite lifts/exercises that I were more isolated or helped with functional mobility and injury prevention for running.

    So, I guess I really didn't do StrongLifts 5x5, I just did the lifts with low reps/heavy weight :)

    Picking a routine is very personal. Some people love split training because they want to lift everyday. I don't like split training because I like to alternate running with lifting. That's my primary reason for picking a full body workout routine that I can execute 2 - 4 times per week.

    Getting a trainer is definitely a good suggestion, just be careful of trainers at big box gyms. I used a trainer many years ago at LA fitness that told me he was only getting $6 per 30 minute session. I felt I got lucky with him because he was actually very knowledgable.
  • Cant_think_of_a_usernameCant_think_of_a_username Member Posts: 89 Member Member Posts: 89 Member
    I think it's all horses for courses and depends on a lot of factors. The main issue that newbies can have with 5x5 is that the weight progression happens pretty fast depending on where you set your starting weights for each movement - if you are a "mature" lifter with some pre-existing creaky joints that can become tough going.

    If that's the case then a programme that uses double progression can be better as your joints have a bit longer to get used to handling the load and you "grease the groove" (muscle memory takes over the movement patterns) - so for example you would start with a given weight and increase reps per set each week, starting at 8 reps until you can get 12 reps. Then add 10% to the bar, drop back to 8 reps and repeat until you can get 12 reps etc.
    This is much simplified but you get the idea.

    The best things is to have a go at a programme, run it exactly as written and see how you get on - listen to your body and make changes if you need to.
  • nygator06nygator06 Member Posts: 22 Member Member Posts: 22 Member
    Thanks to everyone with the good advice.
  • nygator06nygator06 Member Posts: 22 Member Member Posts: 22 Member
    Ok I have an appointment today with what sounds like a good trainer . Came recommended from a few people that visit my local gym . Thanks to everyone for the insight and advice.
  • riffraff2112riffraff2112 Member Posts: 1,753 Member Member Posts: 1,753 Member
    Trainer is great advice. I like the 5x5 workout but only for a limited time when I want to change things up. I will usually run through two or three cycles of it, maybe twice a year. I am not a big fan of the rep range, and often modify it so that it works best for my goals.
Sign In or Register to comment.