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I'm starting to buy into the X3 Bar System (weights are a waste of time)

FiberousJFiberousJ Member Posts: 64 Member Member Posts: 64 Member
Perhaps you've heard of the X3 Bar. It's a small bar that you can attach heavy duty weight resistance bands to. The creator John Jaquish claims that weights are a ''waste of time'' because you can build muscle with his bar through variable resistance.

The idea is that you are weak at the bottom of your lifts and strongest as you get closer to the top.
By using variable resistance, you are able to take advantage of your body's biomechanics and get in the resistance you need at your strongest points but saving your joints on the weak points.

The Dr. does make a good point. Many people that have been lifting heavy for years do have some kind of nagging pain. The stronger you get, the more load you're putting on your joints.

I laughed at the system for a long time. I still don't own it, but I ordered one that was 5 times cheaper and is similar. I will admit that I had the best shoulder press set of my life. It not only fried my muscles, but I was able to get a full range of motion without any pain at all. It just has a totally smoother feel than free weights.

I'm not claiming that it can give you the muscles of an Olympic bodybuilder. But I'm starting to believe that for the average person who isn't trying to get extremely muscular, this system might be better because not only does it really challenge you, but your joints feel better than when you do free weights. You're pain-free.

Now, my disclaimer is that this is just my opinon right now. I could be missing something. It is interesting to know that gyms are so huge, with so many different machines. It's hard to believe that something like a bar with bands can provide you a similar benefit but with much more convenience. But after doing it, I admit it gives me a different kind of workout and it's tough and pain free.
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Replies

  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 45,210 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 45,210 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    One's muscles grow/get stronger by progressive overload. That being said, the muscles don't know if the resistance use to get the progressive overload is a barbell, dumbbell, resistance band, bodyweight or a cow.
    Yes but the overload is two fold. You have CONCENTRIC CONTRACTION (where the muscle shortens) and ECCENTRIC CONTRACTION (where the muscle lengthens). It's the ECCENTRIC contraction that creates the microtears in muscle (due to the stretching out of muscle and fascia) that cause muscle hypertrophy much more than CONCENTRIC contractions do. You DON'T get eccentric contractions from bands because the tension reduces when the band shortens.
    Bands were created for REHABILITATION. As OP stated they are less resistant on the joints which is what you need when you rehabbing an injury or from surgery. The fitness industry just MADE UP workouts and equipment with this idea to make more money. They did the same with balance balls, Bosu balls, etc.
    If one is really thinking about it, you can do all the balance, core, functional exercises you want to a T, but how much of it do you really apply to your life? Unless you're an elite athlete, in the majority of cases people don't even apply it to their daily life. For instance, how often is one balancing on one foot on an unstable surface? I get if you're a surfer, skateboarder or skier of some sort, but how applicable is that to the average American who works a 9-5 job?

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/eccentric-muscle-contraction

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
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    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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    To be honest, one is balancing on one foot with each step they take so balance really impact activities of daily living. Now most likely each step isn't on an unstable surface but nice to have the core strength and balance one can improve on via a bit of unstable surface training when the ability to balance on an unstable surface is needed.
    Yes but the TIME spent between steps ISN'T trying to balance on one foot 30 seconds at a time. Even people with great core strength and balance who have never rode a surfboard, paddleboard, walked a tight rope, etc. would likely fail keeping balance initially. Point is, you train for whatever your goals are, NOT to appeal to the idea that just cause you're doing means it's much more advantageous when you try something new. When you try something new, REPETITION will accustom one to that particular workout or sport.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 20,374 Member Member, Premium Posts: 20,374 Member
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    Perhaps you've heard of the X3 Bar. It's a small bar that you can attach heavy duty weight resistance bands to. The creator John Jaquish claims that weights are a ''waste of time'' because you can build muscle with his bar through variable resistance.

    The idea is that you are weak at the bottom of your lifts and strongest as you get closer to the top.
    By using variable resistance, you are able to take advantage of your body's biomechanics and get in the resistance you need at your strongest points but saving your joints on the weak points.

    The Dr. does make a good point. Many people that have been lifting heavy for years do have some kind of nagging pain. The stronger you get, the more load you're putting on your joints.

    I laughed at the system for a long time. I still don't own it, but I ordered one that was 5 times cheaper and is similar. I will admit that I had the best shoulder press set of my life. It not only fried my muscles, but I was able to get a full range of motion without any pain at all. It just has a totally smoother feel than free weights.

    I'm not claiming that it can give you the muscles of an Olympic bodybuilder. But I'm starting to believe that for the average person who isn't trying to get extremely muscular, this system might be better because not only does it really challenge you, but your joints feel better than when you do free weights. You're pain-free.

    Now, my disclaimer is that this is just my opinon right now. I could be missing something. It is interesting to know that gyms are so huge, with so many different machines. It's hard to believe that something like a bar with bands can provide you a similar benefit but with much more convenience. But after doing it, I admit it gives me a different kind of workout and it's tough and pain free.

    Welllll . . . there are lots of kinds of useful exercise. The one you're talking about has pros and cons, as the training experts above have pointed out. Whether it's "better" depends on what one's goals are. Even average people have different goals, interests, circumstances.

    I can understand the appeal of looking for "the best method" for weight loss, fitness, etc. Trouble is, I don't think there is one. Some diets or exercises are generally bad, objectively, sure - if they risk harm disproportionate to their benefits, for example. There are diets and exercises with benefits, but that may not suit all goals or be the best way to achieve a particular goal(s) for a particular person(s). There's no one diet or exercise that is "the best" for everyone and everything. It's more individual than that.

    To the bolded: On what basis do you say that?

    I rowed (a shell on a river) this morning with a 74 year old woman who's been lifting since she was in her 30s, an era when generally women didn't do that (she got laughed at in gyms back then). She doesn't mention nagging pain, and we do talk about stuff like that. (She talked about nagging pain when her doctor thought she had sciatica, and it turned out she had a fractured hip she was walking around on. She had hip replacement surgery, was back in a boat, rowing, 30 days to the day after that surgery. That speedy recovery has something to do with having lifted heavy for years, I'd say.)

    I'm old(-ish), 65. I have lots of friends around my age (+/- 10 years, say). You know who has lots of nagging pain, IME? The people who sat around doing pretty much nothing most of the time, and either got and stayed obese/inactive, or yo-yo dieted and exercised, only to end up obese and in really bad physical condition. (One of those friends had a hip replacement, infections, an extended stay in a rehab facility, a later replacement of the replacement, last I knew - several years after the last surgery - was still using a cane at least part of the time to walk.)

    You're doing a good thing, by exercising.

    That said, by my age, really a lot of us have a bit of nagging stuff going on, just from general wear and tear. If we're lucky, it's NBD, just a thing that's there to work with (or around).

    I think you're fine working with your band-resistance system, if it seems enjoyable, beneficial and not injury-provoking. It's good that you brought it up here, since others might also like it. But "better for the average person"? I dunno, probably not universally.
  • FiberousJFiberousJ Member Posts: 64 Member Member Posts: 64 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    Perhaps you've heard of the X3 Bar. It's a small bar that you can attach heavy duty weight resistance bands to. The creator John Jaquish claims that weights are a ''waste of time'' because you can build muscle with his bar through variable resistance.

    The idea is that you are weak at the bottom of your lifts and strongest as you get closer to the top.
    By using variable resistance, you are able to take advantage of your body's biomechanics and get in the resistance you need at your strongest points but saving your joints on the weak points.

    The Dr. does make a good point. Many people that have been lifting heavy for years do have some kind of nagging pain. The stronger you get, the more load you're putting on your joints.

    I laughed at the system for a long time. I still don't own it, but I ordered one that was 5 times cheaper and is similar. I will admit that I had the best shoulder press set of my life. It not only fried my muscles, but I was able to get a full range of motion without any pain at all. It just has a totally smoother feel than free weights.

    I'm not claiming that it can give you the muscles of an Olympic bodybuilder. But I'm starting to believe that for the average person who isn't trying to get extremely muscular, this system might be better because not only does it really challenge you, but your joints feel better than when you do free weights. You're pain-free.

    Now, my disclaimer is that this is just my opinon right now. I could be missing something. It is interesting to know that gyms are so huge, with so many different machines. It's hard to believe that something like a bar with bands can provide you a similar benefit but with much more convenience. But after doing it, I admit it gives me a different kind of workout and it's tough and pain free.
    I'll repeat from my earlier post. You DON'T get ECCENTRIC contraction with bands. You get progressive resistance as a band lengthens, but as it shortens, the tension reduces, hence the reason they are used in REHAB to protect the joints. Without ECCENTRIC contractions, you SEVERELY reduce the progress of muscle hypertrophy versus a program that has both Concentric and Eccentric contractions involved.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png



    Are you sure about that? When I'm doing a military press with the X3 Bar (generic one) I can feel tension when the weight is coming down. Isn't that eccentric? Dr. John argues that most bands are not heavy enough and aren't attached to a bar. And the program is only designed for one set for each exercise. It is true that after doing one set until failure, it's hard to do another set for that muscle. With weight training, it's easy to do 3 to 6 sets for a muscle. So maybe the difference really comes down to heavy-duty bands and a bar.
  • sijomialsijomial Member, Premium Posts: 18,551 Member Member, Premium Posts: 18,551 Member
    "Many people that have been lifting heavy for years do have some kind of nagging pain. "
    Yep - been lifting for over 40 years.
    But my nagging pain comes from several high-speed motorcycle crashes, a genetic predisposition to disc prolapses, a couple of car drivers who smashed into me and a couple of bicycle crashes where I learned I fly better than I land.

    Lifting has been a huge part of overcoming my injuries, restoring function and reducing daily pain. Sure, I've hurt myself a couple of times lifting with more enthusiasm than sense but the benefits waaaaaay exceed the downsides.

    "Weights are a waste of time". That's the kind of one-eyed hyperbole you expect to see in advertising and not in a debate.
    "And the program is only designed for one set for each exercise" - that's a huge red flag. Appropriate volume (at the correct intensity) is a massive driver for progress whether your primary goal is strength or hypertrophy.
    My impression from what's been said is of an inferior piece of equipment with poor programming. If the average person is a beginner then yes they will probably progress but that's mainly because any old training works for beginners.

    Bands have their place in some people's routines and good for rehab but no they aren't superior, just different with their own set of pros and cons.


  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 1,891 Member Member Posts: 1,891 Member
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    Perhaps you've heard of the X3 Bar. It's a small bar that you can attach heavy duty weight resistance bands to. The creator John Jaquish claims that weights are a ''waste of time'' because you can build muscle with his bar through variable resistance.

    The idea is that you are weak at the bottom of your lifts and strongest as you get closer to the top.
    By using variable resistance, you are able to take advantage of your body's biomechanics and get in the resistance you need at your strongest points but saving your joints on the weak points.

    The Dr. does make a good point. Many people that have been lifting heavy for years do have some kind of nagging pain. The stronger you get, the more load you're putting on your joints.

    I laughed at the system for a long time. I still don't own it, but I ordered one that was 5 times cheaper and is similar. I will admit that I had the best shoulder press set of my life. It not only fried my muscles, but I was able to get a full range of motion without any pain at all. It just has a totally smoother feel than free weights.

    I'm not claiming that it can give you the muscles of an Olympic bodybuilder. But I'm starting to believe that for the average person who isn't trying to get extremely muscular, this system might be better because not only does it really challenge you, but your joints feel better than when you do free weights. You're pain-free.

    Now, my disclaimer is that this is just my opinon right now. I could be missing something. It is interesting to know that gyms are so huge, with so many different machines. It's hard to believe that something like a bar with bands can provide you a similar benefit but with much more convenience. But after doing it, I admit it gives me a different kind of workout and it's tough and pain free.
    I'll repeat from my earlier post. You DON'T get ECCENTRIC contraction with bands. You get progressive resistance as a band lengthens, but as it shortens, the tension reduces, hence the reason they are used in REHAB to protect the joints. Without ECCENTRIC contractions, you SEVERELY reduce the progress of muscle hypertrophy versus a program that has both Concentric and Eccentric contractions involved.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png



    Are you sure about that? When I'm doing a military press with the X3 Bar (generic one) I can feel tension when the weight is coming down. Isn't that eccentric? Dr. John argues that most bands are not heavy enough and aren't attached to a bar. And the program is only designed for one set for each exercise. It is true that after doing one set until failure, it's hard to do another set for that muscle. With weight training, it's easy to do 3 to 6 sets for a muscle. So maybe the difference really comes down to heavy-duty bands and a bar.

    Copying Arthur Jone's (inventor of Nautilus machines) idea from the 1970's (and probably someone before him).
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 45,210 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 45,210 Member
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    Perhaps you've heard of the X3 Bar. It's a small bar that you can attach heavy duty weight resistance bands to. The creator John Jaquish claims that weights are a ''waste of time'' because you can build muscle with his bar through variable resistance.

    The idea is that you are weak at the bottom of your lifts and strongest as you get closer to the top.
    By using variable resistance, you are able to take advantage of your body's biomechanics and get in the resistance you need at your strongest points but saving your joints on the weak points.

    The Dr. does make a good point. Many people that have been lifting heavy for years do have some kind of nagging pain. The stronger you get, the more load you're putting on your joints.

    I laughed at the system for a long time. I still don't own it, but I ordered one that was 5 times cheaper and is similar. I will admit that I had the best shoulder press set of my life. It not only fried my muscles, but I was able to get a full range of motion without any pain at all. It just has a totally smoother feel than free weights.

    I'm not claiming that it can give you the muscles of an Olympic bodybuilder. But I'm starting to believe that for the average person who isn't trying to get extremely muscular, this system might be better because not only does it really challenge you, but your joints feel better than when you do free weights. You're pain-free.

    Now, my disclaimer is that this is just my opinon right now. I could be missing something. It is interesting to know that gyms are so huge, with so many different machines. It's hard to believe that something like a bar with bands can provide you a similar benefit but with much more convenience. But after doing it, I admit it gives me a different kind of workout and it's tough and pain free.
    I'll repeat from my earlier post. You DON'T get ECCENTRIC contraction with bands. You get progressive resistance as a band lengthens, but as it shortens, the tension reduces, hence the reason they are used in REHAB to protect the joints. Without ECCENTRIC contractions, you SEVERELY reduce the progress of muscle hypertrophy versus a program that has both Concentric and Eccentric contractions involved.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png



    Are you sure about that? When I'm doing a military press with the X3 Bar (generic one) I can feel tension when the weight is coming down. Isn't that eccentric? Dr. John argues that most bands are not heavy enough and aren't attached to a bar. And the program is only designed for one set for each exercise. It is true that after doing one set until failure, it's hard to do another set for that muscle. With weight training, it's easy to do 3 to 6 sets for a muscle. So maybe the difference really comes down to heavy-duty bands and a bar.
    Positive about it. It's basic kinesiology 101. You may THINK you feel the tension, but the REALITY is as the band shortens, the resistance lessens. Try this. Do a squat with the eccentric motion of a 100lbs band going down slow, and then with 100lbs of weight on your back and tell me the resistance is the same. Or even a bench press.
    And your assessment isn't comparable UNLESS you do the same thing with weighted resistance. If you work to utter failure with weighted resistance with the same kind of force, it'd be hard to continue. I could do 3 sets of band work if the resistance was only 80% of my max even if I did each set to failure. You just recover to do it.

    https://www.unm.edu/~lkravitz/Article folder/eccentricUNM.html

    https://resistancebandtraining.com/muscle-soreness-with-band-training/

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    edited May 11
  • FiberousJFiberousJ Member Posts: 64 Member Member Posts: 64 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    Perhaps you've heard of the X3 Bar. It's a small bar that you can attach heavy duty weight resistance bands to. The creator John Jaquish claims that weights are a ''waste of time'' because you can build muscle with his bar through variable resistance.

    The idea is that you are weak at the bottom of your lifts and strongest as you get closer to the top.
    By using variable resistance, you are able to take advantage of your body's biomechanics and get in the resistance you need at your strongest points but saving your joints on the weak points.

    The Dr. does make a good point. Many people that have been lifting heavy for years do have some kind of nagging pain. The stronger you get, the more load you're putting on your joints.

    I laughed at the system for a long time. I still don't own it, but I ordered one that was 5 times cheaper and is similar. I will admit that I had the best shoulder press set of my life. It not only fried my muscles, but I was able to get a full range of motion without any pain at all. It just has a totally smoother feel than free weights.

    I'm not claiming that it can give you the muscles of an Olympic bodybuilder. But I'm starting to believe that for the average person who isn't trying to get extremely muscular, this system might be better because not only does it really challenge you, but your joints feel better than when you do free weights. You're pain-free.

    Now, my disclaimer is that this is just my opinon right now. I could be missing something. It is interesting to know that gyms are so huge, with so many different machines. It's hard to believe that something like a bar with bands can provide you a similar benefit but with much more convenience. But after doing it, I admit it gives me a different kind of workout and it's tough and pain free.
    I'll repeat from my earlier post. You DON'T get ECCENTRIC contraction with bands. You get progressive resistance as a band lengthens, but as it shortens, the tension reduces, hence the reason they are used in REHAB to protect the joints. Without ECCENTRIC contractions, you SEVERELY reduce the progress of muscle hypertrophy versus a program that has both Concentric and Eccentric contractions involved.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png



    Are you sure about that? When I'm doing a military press with the X3 Bar (generic one) I can feel tension when the weight is coming down. Isn't that eccentric? Dr. John argues that most bands are not heavy enough and aren't attached to a bar. And the program is only designed for one set for each exercise. It is true that after doing one set until failure, it's hard to do another set for that muscle. With weight training, it's easy to do 3 to 6 sets for a muscle. So maybe the difference really comes down to heavy-duty bands and a bar.
    Positive about it. It's basic kinesiology 101. You may THINK you feel the tension, but the REALITY is as the band shortens, the resistance lessens. Try this. Do a squat with the eccentric motion of a 100lbs band going down slow, and then with 100lbs of weight on your back and tell me the resistance is the same. Or even a bench press.
    And your assessment isn't comparable UNLESS you do the same thing with weighted resistance. If you work to utter failure with weighted resistance with the same kind of force, it'd be hard to continue. I could do 3 sets of band work if the resistance was only 80% of my max even if I did each set to failure. You just recover to do it.

    https://www.unm.edu/~lkravitz/Article folder/eccentricUNM.html

    https://resistancebandtraining.com/muscle-soreness-with-band-training/

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png



    Well, maybe you're right then. But I will say that my body feels better with the bands. It's almost like I'm swimming, not weight-bearing. I talked with Dr. Jaquish and asked him if bodybuilders would need to lift weights if they had X3 and he said no point.
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 45,210 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 45,210 Member
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    Perhaps you've heard of the X3 Bar. It's a small bar that you can attach heavy duty weight resistance bands to. The creator John Jaquish claims that weights are a ''waste of time'' because you can build muscle with his bar through variable resistance.

    The idea is that you are weak at the bottom of your lifts and strongest as you get closer to the top.
    By using variable resistance, you are able to take advantage of your body's biomechanics and get in the resistance you need at your strongest points but saving your joints on the weak points.

    The Dr. does make a good point. Many people that have been lifting heavy for years do have some kind of nagging pain. The stronger you get, the more load you're putting on your joints.

    I laughed at the system for a long time. I still don't own it, but I ordered one that was 5 times cheaper and is similar. I will admit that I had the best shoulder press set of my life. It not only fried my muscles, but I was able to get a full range of motion without any pain at all. It just has a totally smoother feel than free weights.

    I'm not claiming that it can give you the muscles of an Olympic bodybuilder. But I'm starting to believe that for the average person who isn't trying to get extremely muscular, this system might be better because not only does it really challenge you, but your joints feel better than when you do free weights. You're pain-free.

    Now, my disclaimer is that this is just my opinon right now. I could be missing something. It is interesting to know that gyms are so huge, with so many different machines. It's hard to believe that something like a bar with bands can provide you a similar benefit but with much more convenience. But after doing it, I admit it gives me a different kind of workout and it's tough and pain free.
    I'll repeat from my earlier post. You DON'T get ECCENTRIC contraction with bands. You get progressive resistance as a band lengthens, but as it shortens, the tension reduces, hence the reason they are used in REHAB to protect the joints. Without ECCENTRIC contractions, you SEVERELY reduce the progress of muscle hypertrophy versus a program that has both Concentric and Eccentric contractions involved.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png



    Are you sure about that? When I'm doing a military press with the X3 Bar (generic one) I can feel tension when the weight is coming down. Isn't that eccentric? Dr. John argues that most bands are not heavy enough and aren't attached to a bar. And the program is only designed for one set for each exercise. It is true that after doing one set until failure, it's hard to do another set for that muscle. With weight training, it's easy to do 3 to 6 sets for a muscle. So maybe the difference really comes down to heavy-duty bands and a bar.
    Positive about it. It's basic kinesiology 101. You may THINK you feel the tension, but the REALITY is as the band shortens, the resistance lessens. Try this. Do a squat with the eccentric motion of a 100lbs band going down slow, and then with 100lbs of weight on your back and tell me the resistance is the same. Or even a bench press.
    And your assessment isn't comparable UNLESS you do the same thing with weighted resistance. If you work to utter failure with weighted resistance with the same kind of force, it'd be hard to continue. I could do 3 sets of band work if the resistance was only 80% of my max even if I did each set to failure. You just recover to do it.

    https://www.unm.edu/~lkravitz/Article folder/eccentricUNM.html

    https://resistancebandtraining.com/muscle-soreness-with-band-training/

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png



    Well, maybe you're right then. But I will say that my body feels better with the bands. It's almost like I'm swimming, not weight-bearing. I talked with Dr. Jaquish and asked him if bodybuilders would need to lift weights if they had X3 and he said no point.
    Less tension on the joints WILL feel better. That's why bands are used for REHAB. That's emphatically stated by the link I sent. And how does a doctor justify his statement when bodybuilders for decades have built mass with progressive overload that includes eccentric contractions? Logically if eccentric contractions AREN'T stressed by bands and it's ECCENTRIC contractions that are more responsible for the microtears that CAUSE MUSCLE BUILDING, why is the doctor making the statement that bands are just as efficient? For one reason.......................to sell you product. And you bought into it.
    I gave you the correct info. Backed it by science. So you'll deny it because this doc duped you into believing in his product?

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 45,210 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 45,210 Member
    Also to OP, incidentally I worked in a gym linked to physical therapy (currently owned by Stanford Medical). So I'm very familiar with how REHAB works in PT settings and the equipment used for them. After PT, they were sent to us for further improvement in their rehabilitation. And BANDS weren't what we were using to strengthen them. It was free weights, machines, cables and body weight.
    Also, if doctor Jaquish told you he got that physique with just bands, I have land to sell you. And it's snobbish of him to discount cardio since it's PROVEN to improve heart strength compared to anaerobic exercise.
    Dr. Jaquish is a salesman. He doesn't back his claims with any actual peer reviewed studies, especially on claims of 7x increase in strength. And fat melting off the body due to higher HGH increase from using X3bar. Look beyond his promotion of his product and find studies that back what he says. I couldn't find any.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    edited May 12
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 45,210 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 45,210 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    Perhaps you've heard of the X3 Bar. It's a small bar that you can attach heavy duty weight resistance bands to. The creator John Jaquish claims that weights are a ''waste of time'' because you can build muscle with his bar through variable resistance.

    The idea is that you are weak at the bottom of your lifts and strongest as you get closer to the top.
    By using variable resistance, you are able to take advantage of your body's biomechanics and get in the resistance you need at your strongest points but saving your joints on the weak points.

    The Dr. does make a good point. Many people that have been lifting heavy for years do have some kind of nagging pain. The stronger you get, the more load you're putting on your joints.

    I laughed at the system for a long time. I still don't own it, but I ordered one that was 5 times cheaper and is similar. I will admit that I had the best shoulder press set of my life. It not only fried my muscles, but I was able to get a full range of motion without any pain at all. It just has a totally smoother feel than free weights.

    I'm not claiming that it can give you the muscles of an Olympic bodybuilder. But I'm starting to believe that for the average person who isn't trying to get extremely muscular, this system might be better because not only does it really challenge you, but your joints feel better than when you do free weights. You're pain-free.

    Now, my disclaimer is that this is just my opinon right now. I could be missing something. It is interesting to know that gyms are so huge, with so many different machines. It's hard to believe that something like a bar with bands can provide you a similar benefit but with much more convenience. But after doing it, I admit it gives me a different kind of workout and it's tough and pain free.
    I'll repeat from my earlier post. You DON'T get ECCENTRIC contraction with bands. You get progressive resistance as a band lengthens, but as it shortens, the tension reduces, hence the reason they are used in REHAB to protect the joints. Without ECCENTRIC contractions, you SEVERELY reduce the progress of muscle hypertrophy versus a program that has both Concentric and Eccentric contractions involved.

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    Are you sure about that? When I'm doing a military press with the X3 Bar (generic one) I can feel tension when the weight is coming down. Isn't that eccentric? Dr. John argues that most bands are not heavy enough and aren't attached to a bar. And the program is only designed for one set for each exercise. It is true that after doing one set until failure, it's hard to do another set for that muscle. With weight training, it's easy to do 3 to 6 sets for a muscle. So maybe the difference really comes down to heavy-duty bands and a bar.

    Copying Arthur Jone's (inventor of Nautilus machines) idea from the 1970's (and probably someone before him).
    Mike Mentzer of old school bodybuilding fame did this too.

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  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 2,571 Member Member Posts: 2,571 Member
    I think I have the same X3 Bar imitation. I like it but it doesn't replace weight lifting, but I've never been into super heavy weights. It's nice to have a deadlift alternative with a crappy knee (I mostly use it for supersetting and work in deadlifts and benches with it). Doesn't feel much more than 125 lbs or so, though. And like others have mentioned, it's only that "weight" when you're at the top of the movement.
    edited May 12
  • 33gail3333gail33 Member Posts: 781 Member Member Posts: 781 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    One's muscles grow/get stronger by progressive overload. That being said, the muscles don't know if the resistance use to get the progressive overload is a barbell, dumbbell, resistance band, bodyweight or a cow.
    Yes but the overload is two fold. You have CONCENTRIC CONTRACTION (where the muscle shortens) and ECCENTRIC CONTRACTION (where the muscle lengthens). It's the ECCENTRIC contraction that creates the microtears in muscle (due to the stretching out of muscle and fascia) that cause muscle hypertrophy much more than CONCENTRIC contractions do. You DON'T get eccentric contractions from bands because the tension reduces when the band shortens.
    Bands were created for REHABILITATION. As OP stated they are less resistant on the joints which is what you need when you rehabbing an injury or from surgery. The fitness industry just MADE UP workouts and equipment with this idea to make more money. They did the same with balance balls, Bosu balls, etc.
    If one is really thinking about it, you can do all the balance, core, functional exercises you want to a T, but how much of it do you really apply to your life? Unless you're an elite athlete, in the majority of cases people don't even apply it to their daily life. For instance, how often is one balancing on one foot on an unstable surface? I get if you're a surfer, skateboarder or skier of some sort, but how applicable is that to the average American who works a 9-5 job?

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/eccentric-muscle-contraction

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
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    To be honest, one is balancing on one foot with each step they take so balance really impact activities of daily living. Now most likely each step isn't on an unstable surface but nice to have the core strength and balance one can improve on via a bit of unstable surface training when the ability to balance on an unstable surface is needed.
    Yes but the TIME spent between steps ISN'T trying to balance on one foot 30 seconds at a time. Even people with great core strength and balance who have never rode a surfboard, paddleboard, walked a tight rope, etc. would likely fail keeping balance initially. Point is, you train for whatever your goals are, NOT to appeal to the idea that just cause you're doing means it's much more advantageous when you try something new. When you try something new, REPETITION will accustom one to that particular workout or sport.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
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    The point of balance exercises is to improve ones overall balance and core strength, it reduces falls, especially as people age. It is definitely a functional exercise that is applicable to daily life, probably more so for the average person than a lot of stuff that is done in the gym.
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 45,210 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 45,210 Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    One's muscles grow/get stronger by progressive overload. That being said, the muscles don't know if the resistance use to get the progressive overload is a barbell, dumbbell, resistance band, bodyweight or a cow.
    Yes but the overload is two fold. You have CONCENTRIC CONTRACTION (where the muscle shortens) and ECCENTRIC CONTRACTION (where the muscle lengthens). It's the ECCENTRIC contraction that creates the microtears in muscle (due to the stretching out of muscle and fascia) that cause muscle hypertrophy much more than CONCENTRIC contractions do. You DON'T get eccentric contractions from bands because the tension reduces when the band shortens.
    Bands were created for REHABILITATION. As OP stated they are less resistant on the joints which is what you need when you rehabbing an injury or from surgery. The fitness industry just MADE UP workouts and equipment with this idea to make more money. They did the same with balance balls, Bosu balls, etc.
    If one is really thinking about it, you can do all the balance, core, functional exercises you want to a T, but how much of it do you really apply to your life? Unless you're an elite athlete, in the majority of cases people don't even apply it to their daily life. For instance, how often is one balancing on one foot on an unstable surface? I get if you're a surfer, skateboarder or skier of some sort, but how applicable is that to the average American who works a 9-5 job?

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/eccentric-muscle-contraction

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    To be honest, one is balancing on one foot with each step they take so balance really impact activities of daily living. Now most likely each step isn't on an unstable surface but nice to have the core strength and balance one can improve on via a bit of unstable surface training when the ability to balance on an unstable surface is needed.
    Yes but the TIME spent between steps ISN'T trying to balance on one foot 30 seconds at a time. Even people with great core strength and balance who have never rode a surfboard, paddleboard, walked a tight rope, etc. would likely fail keeping balance initially. Point is, you train for whatever your goals are, NOT to appeal to the idea that just cause you're doing means it's much more advantageous when you try something new. When you try something new, REPETITION will accustom one to that particular workout or sport.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    The point of balance exercises is to improve ones overall balance and core strength, it reduces falls, especially as people age. It is definitely a functional exercise that is applicable to daily life, probably more so for the average person than a lot of stuff that is done in the gym.
    I work with older people daily and have for more than half my time in the business. Walking and standing need no training. People know how to do this from when they first started standing and walking as a child. And while I hear your point, I can EMPHATICALLY tell you that falls come from one thing first with aged adults.......................lack of muscle strength to hold oneself up. Fit people fall down. Kids fall down. What's the main difference when an aged adult falls? Being able to get back up. Now logically sense will tell you that if you strengthen the legs, calves, glutes and back, the percentage of falling will be reduced pretty significantly. I DON'T train many of my older clients on balance, I train their legs, calves, glutes, hips, and low back DIRECTLY with weighted resistance training in order for the muscles to get stronger. Again functional training is usually directed at people who are needing rehab, coming back from injury, surgery, or were laid up for a long time and muscles atrophied. Once they get that functionality back, any good PT or ortho will tell you that they should RESISTANCE train to improve their muscle strength and function.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
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    edited May 12
  • 33gail3333gail33 Member Posts: 781 Member Member Posts: 781 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    One's muscles grow/get stronger by progressive overload. That being said, the muscles don't know if the resistance use to get the progressive overload is a barbell, dumbbell, resistance band, bodyweight or a cow.
    Yes but the overload is two fold. You have CONCENTRIC CONTRACTION (where the muscle shortens) and ECCENTRIC CONTRACTION (where the muscle lengthens). It's the ECCENTRIC contraction that creates the microtears in muscle (due to the stretching out of muscle and fascia) that cause muscle hypertrophy much more than CONCENTRIC contractions do. You DON'T get eccentric contractions from bands because the tension reduces when the band shortens.
    Bands were created for REHABILITATION. As OP stated they are less resistant on the joints which is what you need when you rehabbing an injury or from surgery. The fitness industry just MADE UP workouts and equipment with this idea to make more money. They did the same with balance balls, Bosu balls, etc.
    If one is really thinking about it, you can do all the balance, core, functional exercises you want to a T, but how much of it do you really apply to your life? Unless you're an elite athlete, in the majority of cases people don't even apply it to their daily life. For instance, how often is one balancing on one foot on an unstable surface? I get if you're a surfer, skateboarder or skier of some sort, but how applicable is that to the average American who works a 9-5 job?

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/eccentric-muscle-contraction

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    To be honest, one is balancing on one foot with each step they take so balance really impact activities of daily living. Now most likely each step isn't on an unstable surface but nice to have the core strength and balance one can improve on via a bit of unstable surface training when the ability to balance on an unstable surface is needed.
    Yes but the TIME spent between steps ISN'T trying to balance on one foot 30 seconds at a time. Even people with great core strength and balance who have never rode a surfboard, paddleboard, walked a tight rope, etc. would likely fail keeping balance initially. Point is, you train for whatever your goals are, NOT to appeal to the idea that just cause you're doing means it's much more advantageous when you try something new. When you try something new, REPETITION will accustom one to that particular workout or sport.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    The point of balance exercises is to improve ones overall balance and core strength, it reduces falls, especially as people age. It is definitely a functional exercise that is applicable to daily life, probably more so for the average person than a lot of stuff that is done in the gym.
    I work with older people daily and have for more than half my time in the business. Walking and standing need no training. People know how to do this from when they first started standing and walking as a child. And while I hear your point, I can EMPHATICALLY tell you that falls come from one thing first with aged adults.......................lack of muscle strength to hold oneself up. Fit people fall down. Kids fall down. What's the main difference when an aged adult falls? Being able to get back up. Now logically sense will tell you that if you strengthen the legs, calves, glutes and back, the percentage of falling will be reduced pretty significantly. I DON'T train many of my older clients on balance, I train their legs, calves, glutes, hips, and low back DIRECTLY with weighted resistance training in order for the muscles to get stronger. Again functional training is usually directed at people who are needing rehab, coming back from injury, surgery, or were laid up for a long time and muscles atrophied. Once they get that functionality back, any good PT or ortho will tell you that they should RESISTANCE train to improve their muscle strength and function.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    Interesting. My PT includes balance training I believe with all her clients (myself included). I get that everyone walks and stands, but the way she explained it is that it trains the core muscles so that you are more able to maintain balance, especially important as we age.
    For example I walk my dogs every day year round and live where we often have slippery sidewalks in winter, so the balance exercises would train me to better maintain my balance to avoid falling. So if I slipped a bit on some ice, or had one of the dogs knock into me, I could automatically right myself more easily, instead of falling.
    Makes sense to me, but I guess different trainers have different approaches. Perhaps it is only relevant to the segment of the population who are not likely to partake in heavy resistance training, I'm not sure about that.
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