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Energy required to break covalent bonds of DNA

NicoleisQuantizedNicoleisQuantized Member Posts: 344 Member Member Posts: 344 Member
For those of you who fear microwave radiation:

The wavelength of light that is needed to damage DNA lies in the higher energy regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, the higher end of the Ultra-violet (10 x 10^-9 m to 400 x 10^-9 m), the X-Ray (0.01 x 10^-9 to 10 x 10^-9 m), or the Gamma (< 0.02 x 10^-9 m).

Microwave light lies in the low energy region of the electromagnetic spectrum, or 1 mm to 1 m.

Furthermore, the photon energy required to break one of the chemical bonds of DNA, if we use the canonical equations relating the wavelength of light to the energy of a photon:

E = hν

where E is the energy (J, Joules which is a unit of energy), h is Plank's Constant (6.626 × 10-34 J s), and ν is the frequency (s^-1) of the wavelength of light. The frequency is also expressed in terms of the wavelength

ν= c/λ

where c is the speed of light (2.9979 x 10^8 m/s) and λ is the wavelength of light (in meters, m).

So, the energy for a photon is

E = hc/λ

Plugging in the values for the speed of light, Plank's constant, and the higher enery end of the Microwave region, or 1 mm (1 x 10^-3 m), the energy of a photon is

E = [(6.626 x 10^-34 Js)(2.9979 x 10^8 m/s)]/ (1 x 10^-3 m) = 1.986 x 10^-22 J

Similarly, the energy of a photon in the lower and upper regions of the Electromagnetic spectrum are

E = [(6.626 x 10^-34 Js)(2.9979 x 10^8 m/s)]/ (400 x 10^-9 m) = 4.966 x 10^-19 J

E = [(6.626 x 10^-34 Js)(2.9979 x 10^8 m/s)]/ (10 x 10^-9 m) = 1.986 x 10^-17 J.

The energy required to break the covalent bonds (the class of bond that exists between all of the atoms in DNA), the most common being carbon-hydrogen (C-H), carbon-carbon (C-C), and carbon-nitrogen (C-N) have bond energies 413, 348, and 308 kJ/mol, respectively ( a mol means 6.022 x 10^23 constituent particles or atoms per mol; a mol is a unit).

So, the energy in the weakest bond (in this case the carbon-nitrogen bond) is

E = (308 x 10^3 J/mol)/(6.022 x 10^23 mol^-1) = 5.115 x 10^-19 J

THEREFORE, you need to be in the Ultra-violet region of the electromagnetic spectrum.
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Replies

  • Kathy_TheVampireSlayerKathy_TheVampireSlayer Member Posts: 196 Member Member Posts: 196 Member
  • csuharcsuhar Member Posts: 782 Member Member Posts: 782 Member
    Okay. Now the subject makes sense. I was originally pretty stumped by why we were talking about covalent bonds on MFP.
  • IronSmasherIronSmasher Member Posts: 3,931 Member Member Posts: 3,931 Member
    Waves are too big
  • Sarauk2sfSarauk2sf Member Posts: 28,428 Member Member Posts: 28,428 Member
    I like it...I have no idea what it says, but I like it!
  • MoreBean13MoreBean13 Member Posts: 9,175 Member Member Posts: 9,175 Member
  • Chief_RockaChief_Rocka Member Posts: 4,770 Member Member Posts: 4,770 Member
    Now you've got me all hot and bothered
  • drmercdrmerc Member Posts: 2,792 Member Member Posts: 2,792 Member
    I was just thinking the same thing
  • etoiles_argenteesetoiles_argentees Member Posts: 2,853 Member Member Posts: 2,853 Member
  • sunsnstatheartsunsnstatheart Member Posts: 2,599 Member Member Posts: 2,599 Member
    I don't fear microwave radiation but I would fear a test on that^.
  • infamousmkinfamousmk Member Posts: 6,151 Member Member Posts: 6,151 Member
    I use microwaves to heat hot toddies.
  • WendyTerry420WendyTerry420 Member Posts: 13,349 Member Member Posts: 13,349 Member
    I hope this means that microwaves are safe. Lots of crazy threads on microwaves lately.

    tumblr_manxt3CV0U1r76lino1_500.gif
  • cmcollins001cmcollins001 Member Posts: 3,550 Member Member Posts: 3,550 Member
    There are these numbers and letters n stuff...and they mean really cool things...and then bad people go to jail, and good people live forever and eat out of microwaves!!!!

    Numb3rs_guy.jpg
  • Duck_PuddleDuck_Puddle Member Posts: 3,204 Member Member Posts: 3,204 Member
    I don't fear microwaves, but I fear engineers and anyone else who thought differential equations and linear algebra were "fun" courses.
  • MoreBean13MoreBean13 Member Posts: 9,175 Member Member Posts: 9,175 Member
    I don't fear microwaves, but I fear engineers and anyone else who thought differential equations and linear algebra were "fun" courses.

    I'm an engineer. DiffEq was NOT fun. Just for the record.

    Physical chemistry was fun. We blew stuff up.
  • Duck_PuddleDuck_Puddle Member Posts: 3,204 Member Member Posts: 3,204 Member
    I don't fear microwaves, but I fear engineers and anyone else who thought differential equations and linear algebra were "fun" courses.

    I'm an engineer. DiffEq was NOT fun. Just for the record.

    Physical chemistry was fun. We blew stuff up.

    Oh good! You're infinitely less frightening than the engineers I've known irl. I'm not big on blowing things up-but to each his or her own-as long as we agree that differential equations is not a good time-then we have common ground.
  • Awkward30Awkward30 Member Posts: 1,927 Member Member Posts: 1,927 Member
    I don't fear microwaves, but I fear engineers and anyone else who thought differential equations and linear algebra were "fun" courses.

    I'm an engineer. DiffEq was NOT fun. Just for the record.

    Physical chemistry was fun. We blew stuff up.

    Magnesium?
  • GiddyupTimGiddyupTim Member Posts: 2,819 Member Member Posts: 2,819 Member
    So, you can put the cat in there . . . .
  • MarieAnneNMarieAnneN Member Posts: 205 Member Posts: 205
    Ok, I don't know squat about chemistry and physics aside E=MC2... But this thread is getting really interesting! :)
  • MerrychrissmithMerrychrissmith Member Posts: 326 Member Member Posts: 326 Member
    I am invoking the Heisenberg uncertainty principle as well as the second law of thermodynamics in understanding this.....hmmm,,, seems reasonable.
  • MerrychrissmithMerrychrissmith Member Posts: 326 Member Member Posts: 326 Member
    So, you can put the cat in there . . . .

    Schrodingers?
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