Sugar is killing you.

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Replies

  • _TastySnoBalls_
    _TastySnoBalls_ Posts: 1,328 Member
    :yawn:
  • a_stronger_me13
    a_stronger_me13 Posts: 812 Member

    :love: :love: :love:

    PS I'm from Iowa too. :drinker:

    Great, now I have to move.

    don't worry I beat you to it and went to a place that values health and wellness, though I will admit Iowa is pretty great as far as midwest states go.

    There's that elitist attitude we all love so much.
  • smantha32
    smantha32 Posts: 6,993 Member
    While technically I agree, there's just way too much pseudoscience out there on this. And too many of the people who write these scientific articles are total hacks, so anything they write is automatically discounted.

    I believe it's killing us, but not so much because it's a toxic substance, but because consumption has gone up like 600% in less than 100 years. A lot of things you over consume can potentially kill you.

    All I can say is personally if I limit sugar consumption I feel better in all areas.
  • cwsreddy
    cwsreddy Posts: 998 Member

    :love: :love: :love:

    PS I'm from Iowa too. :drinker:

    Great, now I have to move.

    don't worry I beat you to it and went to a place that values health and wellness, though I will admit Iowa is pretty great as far as midwest states go.

    There's that elitist attitude we all love so much.

    if you got it flaunt it right? y'all know you missed me.
  • Achrya
    Achrya Posts: 16,913 Member
    Now I want a candy bar...

    I haven't had a candy bar in forever. But tomorrow is a five mile day and I'm out of sour patch kids...I could swing a candy bar. Oh, but what kind of get.

    I've always been a snickers fan.

    It's always reeses for me..

    I don't like peanut butter.


    It's actually amazing I got fat considering how I hate most popular 'junk' food.
  • a_stronger_me13
    a_stronger_me13 Posts: 812 Member

    :love: :love: :love:

    PS I'm from Iowa too. :drinker:

    Great, now I have to move.

    don't worry I beat you to it and went to a place that values health and wellness, though I will admit Iowa is pretty great as far as midwest states go.

    There's that elitist attitude we all love so much.

    if you got it flaunt it right? y'all know you missed me.

    What do you have exactly?
  • cwsreddy
    cwsreddy Posts: 998 Member

    :love: :love: :love:

    PS I'm from Iowa too. :drinker:

    Great, now I have to move.

    don't worry I beat you to it and went to a place that values health and wellness, though I will admit Iowa is pretty great as far as midwest states go.

    There's that elitist attitude we all love so much.

    wait you're in Denver though - CO is pretty rad too when it comes to health and general well-being.
  • a_stronger_me13
    a_stronger_me13 Posts: 812 Member

    :love: :love: :love:

    PS I'm from Iowa too. :drinker:

    Great, now I have to move.

    don't worry I beat you to it and went to a place that values health and wellness, though I will admit Iowa is pretty great as far as midwest states go.

    There's that elitist attitude we all love so much.

    wait you're in Denver though - CO is pretty rad too when it comes to health and general well-being.

    I'm from the midwest. Lived there for 22 years. I don't appreciate the broad sweeping generalizations of how us midwesterners value health and wellness.
  • AJ_G
    AJ_G Posts: 4,158 Member
    The article doesn't distinguish over consumption of sugar vs over consumption of calories in general. When someone over consumes and as a result becomes obese, it's likely that they're over consuming fat and sugar, and not usually protein. It's the sustained over consumption of calories and resulting obesity that causes the health problems at a biological problem. The body does not handle excess stored fat well and that is what is unhealthy, a single macronutrient is not to blame.
  • cwsreddy
    cwsreddy Posts: 998 Member

    :love: :love: :love:

    PS I'm from Iowa too. :drinker:

    Great, now I have to move.

    don't worry I beat you to it and went to a place that values health and wellness, though I will admit Iowa is pretty great as far as midwest states go.

    There's that elitist attitude we all love so much.

    wait you're in Denver though - CO is pretty rad too when it comes to health and general well-being.

    I'm from the midwest. Lived there for 22 years. I don't appreciate the broad sweeping generalizations of how us midwesterners value health and wellness.

    I am too, and obesity rates are significantly higher in the midwest than they are on either coast, though CO is a bastion of awesomeness stuck in the middle. It's not a broad, sweeping generalization it's just statistical fact.
  • julialdr
    julialdr Posts: 100 Member
    The article doesn't distinguish over consumption of sugar vs over consumption of calories in general. When someone over consumes and as a result becomes obese, it's likely that they're over consuming fat and sugar, and not usually protein. It's the sustained over consumption of calories and resulting obesity that causes the health problems at a biological problem. The body does not handle excess stored fat well and that is what is unhealthy, a single macronutrient is not to blame.

    That's very true although I was more interested in the discussion on how your body metabolizes fructose and glucose and how the the leptin and grehlin responses differ. I was hoping someone with a greater knowledge on the subject than I could weigh in on that.
  • HollisGrant
    HollisGrant Posts: 2,049 Member
    I've always been a firm believer in 'sugar is sugar', your body doesn't know if you're drinking apple juice, maple syrup or soda and processes them all the same way. That said, just read an interesting article which (while largely agreeing with that belief) cites a number of studies on the way our body metabolizes glucose and fructose and how they directly impact our health, would love to hear what you all have to say!

    Excerpt below but you can read the full article here - http://www.salon.com/2014/02/25/sugar_is_killing_us_and_it_doesnt_take_much_to_destroy_your_body_partner/

    "...The general term “sugar” can mean any number of things. Table sugar, or sucrose, is composed of a glucose molecule bonded to a fructose molecule. Glucose is what plants make during photosynthesis and it’s half as sweet as table sugar. Fructose, naturally found in honey and many fruits, is 70 percent sweeter than table sugar.

    On your tongue, you taste a difference in sweetness between glucose and fructose. Once in your body, the difference continues. Glucose is metabolized by every cell in your body. After you eat, your blood glucose levels rise, and your body releases insulin. The insulin helps your muscles, fat and liver absorb the glucose, decreasing your blood sugar. Levels of another hormone, leptin, also rise. Leptin regulates your appetite; once you’ve eaten and your body has plenty of fuel to keep going, leptin tells you to stop. Another hormone, ghrelin, decreases. Ghrelin stimulates your appetite, and after you’ve eaten, it’s already done its job.

    Fructose, on the other hand, is only metabolized by your liver. The title of a 2004 study says it all: “Dietary fructose reduces circulating insulin and leptin, attenuates postprandial suppression of ghrelin, and increases triglycerides in women.” In other words, after you eat fructose, your body never gets the message, “You’ve eaten enough, now stop.” As for those increased triglycerides, well… another word for triglyceride is “fat.”

    In scientist-speak, “Compared with glucose, the hepatic metabolism of fructose favors lipogenesis, which may contribute to hyperlipidemia and obesity.” Translated, that says when fructose is metabolized in your liver, it is often converted to fat.

    These facts about fructose are often cited in arguments against high-fructose corn syrup, but remember that sucrose, honey and even apple juice contain lots of fructose too.

    One consequence of overdoing it on sweets is called “metabolic syndrome.” That’s a medical term for a number of risk factors for heart disease, diabetes and stroke: a large waistline, bad cholesterol, high blood pressure, and high fasting blood sugar. In fact, fructose and sucrose are such reliable causes of metabolic syndrome that scientific papers often use the terms “fructose-induced metabolic syndrome” or “sucrose-induced metabolic syndrome.”...

    There was a recent CNN article and some follow-ups on CNN about sugar. Run "sugar" through the CNN search feature to see more articles and a video about the subject.


    http://www.cnn.com/2014/02/04/opinion/caudle-sugar-health-study/index.html?iref=allsearch

    Excerpt:

    America is eating way too much added sugar and a new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine shows it. Researchers set out to evaluate how much sugar participants consume and look at the association between added sugar consumption and cardiovascular mortality.

    Most adults in the study, which looked at average adult sugar consumption between 2005 and 2010, ate or drank more than 10% of their total calories in added sugar. About one in 10 adults took in 25% or more of calories from added sugar. Not good.

    The Institute of Medicine says that our daily sugar intake should not be more than 25% of total calories consumed. The World Health Organization says this number should be no more than 10%. The American Heart Association recommends no more than 6 teaspoons or 24 grams (100 calories a day) of sugar for women and no more than 9 teaspoons or 36 grams (150 calories day) for men.

    ***********************************************************************************************************

    Note, the CNN article links to the article in the Journal of American Medicine:

    http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1819573

    Excerpt:

    Original Investigation | February 03, 2014

    Added Sugar Intake and Cardiovascular Diseases Mortality Among US Adults ONLINE FIRST

    Quanhe Yang, PhD1; Zefeng Zhang, MD, PhD1; Edward W. Gregg, PhD2; W. Dana Flanders, MD, ScD3; Robert Merritt, MA1; Frank B. Hu, MD, PhD4,5

    Importance Epidemiologic studies have suggested that higher intake of added sugar is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Few prospective studies have examined the association of added sugar intake with CVD mortality.

    Objective To examine time trends of added sugar consumption as percentage of daily calories in the United States and investigate the association of this consumption with CVD mortality.
  • PikaKnight
    PikaKnight Posts: 34,986 Member

    :love: :love: :love:

    PS I'm from Iowa too. :drinker:

    Great, now I have to move.

    don't worry I beat you to it and went to a place that values health and wellness, though I will admit Iowa is pretty great as far as midwest states go.

    Wow. That was a really crappy generalizing comment to make.
  • FatFreeFrolicking
    FatFreeFrolicking Posts: 4,252 Member
    The article doesn't distinguish over consumption of sugar vs over consumption of calories in general. When someone over consumes and as a result becomes obese, it's likely that they're over consuming fat and sugar, and not usually protein. It's the sustained over consumption of calories and resulting obesity that causes the health problems at a biological problem. The body does not handle excess stored fat well and that is what is unhealthy, a single macronutrient is not to blame.

    That's very true although I was more interested in the discussion on how your body metabolizes fructose and glucose and how the the leptin and grehlin responses differ. I was hoping someone with a greater knowledge on the subject than I could weigh in on that.

    Fructose is a monosaccharide, or single sugar, that has the same chemical formula as glucose but a different molecular structure. Fructose and glucose are metabolized and used by the body in different ways. For instance, glucose from dietary sources is digested, absorbed, transported to the liver, and released into the general blood stream. Many tissues take up glucose from the blood to use for energy; this process requires insulin. Fructose is primarily metabolized in the liver, but unlike glucose it does not require insulin to be used by the body. Fructose has little impact on blood glucose, therefore, the release of insulin is minimal.
  • AJ_G
    AJ_G Posts: 4,158 Member
    The article doesn't distinguish over consumption of sugar vs over consumption of calories in general. When someone over consumes and as a result becomes obese, it's likely that they're over consuming fat and sugar, and not usually protein. It's the sustained over consumption of calories and resulting obesity that causes the health problems at a biological problem. The body does not handle excess stored fat well and that is what is unhealthy, a single macronutrient is not to blame.

    That's very true although I was more interested in the discussion on how your body metabolizes fructose and glucose and how the the leptin and grehlin responses differ. I was hoping someone with a greater knowledge on the subject than I could weigh in on that.


    "Most fructose in both the commercial and natural domain has an equal amount of glucose attached to it. You’d have to go out of your way to obtain fructose without the accompanying glucose. Sucrose is half fructose and half glucose. High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is nearly identical to sucrose in structure and function. Here’s the point I’m getting at: contrary to Lustig’s contentions, both of these compounds have substantial research showing not just their ability to elicit an insulin response, but also their suppressive effect on appetite [3-6].

    But wait, there’s more. In studies directly comparing the effect of fructose and glucose preloads on subsequent food intake, one showed no difference [7], while the majority have shown the fructose preload resulting in lesser food intake than the glucose preload [8-10]. A recent review of the literature on fructose’s effect on satiety found no compelling case for the idea that fructose is less satiating than glucose, or that HFCS is less satiating than sucrose [11]. So much for Lustig’s repeated assertion that fructose and fructose-containing sugars increase subsequent food intake. I suppose it’s easier to sensationalize claims based on rodent data.

    In the single human study I’m aware of that linked fructose to a greater next-day appetite in a subset of the subjects, 30% of total daily energy intake was in the form of free fructose [12]. This amounts to 135 grams, which is the equivalent of 6-7 nondiet soft drinks. Is it really that groundbreaking to think that polishing off a half-dozen soft drinks per day is not a good idea? Demonizing fructose without mentioning the dose-dependent nature of its effects is intellectually dishonest. Like anything else, fructose consumed in gross chronic excess can lead to problems, while moderate amounts are neutral, and in some cases beneficial [13-15].

    So, what’s the upper safe limit of fructose per day (all sources considered)? Again, this depends on a number of variables, not the least of which are an individual’s physical activity level and lean body mass. Currently in the literature is a liberal camp reporting that fructose intakes up to 90 grams per day have a beneficial effect on HbA(1c), and no significant effects are seen for fasting triacylglycerol or body weight with intakes up to 100 grams per day in adults [15]. The conservative camp suggests that the safe range is much less than this; roughly 25-40 grams per day [19]. Figuring that both sides are biased, the middle figure between the two camps is roughly 50 grams for active adults."



    Sources:

    Melanson KJ, et al. High-fructose corn syrup, energy intake, and appetite regulation. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Dec;88(6):1738S-1744S. [Medline]

    Soenen S, Westerterp-Plantenga MS. No differences in satiety or energy intake after high-fructose corn syrup, sucrose, or milk preloads. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Dec;86(6):1586-94. [Medline]

    Monsivais P, Perrigue MM, Drewnowski A. Sugars and satiety: does the type of sweetener make a difference? Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jul;86(1):116-23. [Medline]

    Akhavan T, Anderson GH. Effects of glucose-to-fructose ratios in solutions on subjective satiety, food intake, and satiety hormones in young men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Nov;86(5):1354-63. [Medline]

    Spitzer L, Rodin J. Effects of fructose and glucose preloads on subsequent food intake. Appetite. 1987 Apr;8(2):135-45. [Medline]

    Rodin J, Reed D, Jamner L. Metabolic effects of fructose and glucose: implications for food intake. Am J Clin Nutr. 1988 Apr;47(4):683–9.

    Rodin J. Comparative effects of fructose, aspartame, glucose and water preloads on calorie and macronutrient intake. Am J Clin Nutr 1990;51:428–35. [Medline]

    Rodin J. Effects of pure sugar versus mixed starch fructose loads on food intake. Appetite 1991;17:213–9.[Medline]
    Moran TH. Fructose and satiety. J Nutr. 2009 Jun;139(6):1253S-1256S. Epub 2009 Apr 29. [Medline]

    Teff KL, et al. Dietary fructose reduces circulating insulin and leptin, attenuates postprandial suppression of ghrelin, and increases triglycerides in women. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004 Jun;89(6):2963-72. [Medline]

    Livesy G. Fructose ingestion: dose-dependent responses in health research. J Nutr. 2009 Jun;139(6):1246S-1252S. Epub 2009 Apr 22. [Medline]

    Dolan LC, et al. Evidence-based review on the effect of normal dietary consumption of fructose on development of hyperlipidemia and obesity in healthy, normal weight individuals. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2010 Jan;50(1):53-84. [Medline]

    Livesey G, Taylor R. Fructose consumption and consequences for glycation, plasma triacylglycerol, and body weight: meta-analyses and meta-regression models of intervention studies. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Nov;88(5):1419-37. [Medline]

    White JS. Straight Talk About High-Fructose Corn Syrup: What it is and What it Ain’t. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Dec;88(6):1716S-1721S. [Medline]

    Dyck JH, Ito K. Japan’s fruit and vegetable market. Global Trade Patterns in Fruits and Vegetables. [ERS/USDA]

    Saremi A, Arora R. The cardiovascular implications of alcohol and red wine. Am J Ther. 2008 May-Jun;15(3):265-77. [Medline]

    Sánchez-Lozada LG, et al. How safe is fructose for persons with or without diabetes? Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Nov;88(5):1189-90. [Medline]
  • ndj1979
    ndj1979 Posts: 29,147 Member

    :love: :love: :love:

    PS I'm from Iowa too. :drinker:

    Great, now I have to move.

    don't worry I beat you to it and went to a place that values health and wellness, though I will admit Iowa is pretty great as far as midwest states go.

    There's that elitist attitude we all love so much.

    wait you're in Denver though - CO is pretty rad too when it comes to health and general well-being.

    I'm from the midwest. Lived there for 22 years. I don't appreciate the broad sweeping generalizations of how us midwesterners value health and wellness.

    I am too, and obesity rates are significantly higher in the midwest than they are on either coast, though CO is a bastion of awesomeness stuck in the middle. It's not a broad, sweeping generalization it's just statistical fact.

    LOL + 1
  • suremeansyes
    suremeansyes Posts: 962 Member
    No one told me fitness was going to involve so much reading.
  • brevislux
    brevislux Posts: 1,170 Member
    Sugar is the new fat.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 46,188 Member
    Let's talk statistics here. What are the top 10 countries that consume the most sugar in the world? Well if you don't know here they are:

    Macedonia 73.8
    Belize 65.5
    Swaziland 56.9
    Cuba 56.6
    Trinidad & Tobago 55.3
    Barbados 52.7
    Brazil 51.7
    Costa Rica 50.6
    New Zealand 49.2
    St. Kitt & Nevis 49.0

    WHAT? The US didn't make the top 10?

    Now let's check the obesity rates of these countries.

    Macedonia- Est. 298,512 Population 2,040,085
    Belize- 39,938 272,945
    Swaziland- 171,087 1,169,241
    Cuba- 2,310,000 11,000,000
    Trinidad/Tobago- 399,000 1,330,000
    Barbados- 283,221 195,422
    Brazil- 26,938,323 184,101,109
    Costa Rica- 1,440,000 4,800,000
    New Zealand- 1,373,333 4,443,000
    St. Kitt and Nevis


    http://www.rightdiagnosis.com/o/obesity/stats-country.htm

    So with this info, you'd think they would be the most obese nations in the world too, but they aren't.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal/Group FitnessTrainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition
  • _Zardoz_
    _Zardoz_ Posts: 3,988 Member
    I'm sure if some one continually hit me around the head with a kilo bag of sugar it would kill me