All Calories Are Not Created Equally

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Replies

  • Yanicka1
    Yanicka1 Posts: 4,589 Member
    An inch does not equal an inch? A calorie is a measure. As far as weight loss, a calorie IS a calorie. If you talk about health, it is a different story
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    edited December 2014
    When people say "a calorie is a calorie" they mean that you will gain weight if you take in more calories than you burn and lose weight if you take in fewer calories than you burn. No one thinks a 100 calories of carrot = 100 calories of leg of lamb = 100 calories of Twinkie for nutrient purposes. It's just you would not express that by saying "a calorie is not a calorie" (because it is, it's a unit of energy), but "a carrot is not a leg of lamb" (or simply "different foods have different nutrient make-ups").

    Thus, the article does not actually support the proposition in the title: "a calorie is not a calorie." What the author apparently wants to say is: "there’s a huge difference in the way [different foods] affect your appetite, your energy level, and your long-term health."

    Does anyone think that's actually a debated proposition or something anyone doesn't already know?

    Another problem, of course, is when people take that fact and assume: (1) every food affects everyone the same (i.e., veggies are filling for me and cookies are not, therefore that must be true for everyone and no one should ever eat cookies); or (2) that the fact that nutrition matters means that you are less healthy if you continue to eat some non-nutrient dense foods. (On (2), IMO a more sensible focus is making sure you get enough nutrient dense foods and an overall balanced diet. If you are, and are not overeating, you probably don't have to worry that you are eating a diet of mostly Twinkies or whatever the strawman is.)

    I get the impression that some people think (or perhaps more accurately knowingly choose to misrepresent) that saying "a calorie is a calorie" is supposed to mean that nutrients don't matter, nor does stuff like fiber or how satiating a food is to the person eating it, but of course that's not true and not a remotely reasonable interpretation. It also seems that we are presumed to lack the most basic information about nutrition (like "vegetables are good foods to eat"), but why would you assume that? Do people who worry about this come in knowing so little about nutrition that they must be told these things and assume that's the case for everyone?
  • jacksonpt
    jacksonpt Posts: 10,413 Member
    edited December 2014
    I love how the first couple of sentances talk about calories as they relate to weight loss, but NONE of the rest of the article does... it's all about general health. Dumb article.

    CICO is about weight loss. General health is a totally different topic. Workout performance is yet another. Make sure you understand the context of the conversation.

    Wait, what am I saying??? Context... what's that? No one gives context on MFP.
  • martyqueen52
    martyqueen52 Posts: 1,120 Member
    No studies, no proof, no test results / subjects = bro-science.

    Stop posting useless crap like this. We know calories are created equal. It's been proven over and over with results and proof (Twinkie & McDonalds diet studies). Granted, this was for weight loss not body composition (tracking of P/C/F).

    I hit a 610 PR deadlift last night on a stomach full of Sour-Patch Kids and a Monster Zero... please tell me again how calories are not equal.
  • yopeeps025
    yopeeps025 Posts: 8,692 Member
    in
  • redversustheblue
    redversustheblue Posts: 1,216 Member
    All calories are created equally, but some calories are more equal than others.

    jk in.
  • AdieEve
    AdieEve Posts: 87 Member
    edited December 2014
    The calories you consume will influence your satiety, energy levels (pertaining especially to blood glucose), and long-term health. Will you lose weight eating in a deficit while consuming only junk? Sure. Are you going to feel like crap and possibly suffer health issues in the long-term? Yes. All calories are not created equally.
  • Holly_Roman_Empire
    Holly_Roman_Empire Posts: 4,440 Member
    No studies, no proof, no test results / subjects = bro-science.

    Stop posting useless crap like this. We know calories are created equal. It's been proven over and over with results and proof (Twinkie & McDonalds diet studies). Granted, this was for weight loss not body composition (tracking of P/C/F).

    I hit a 610 PR deadlift last night on a stomach full of Sour-Patch Kids and a Monster Zero... please tell me again how calories are not equal.

    Beat me to it. I was wondering where the studies were, but I guess those aren't required for opinion pieces.
  • beachgod
    beachgod Posts: 567 Member
    edited December 2014
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    edited December 2014
    AdieEve wrote: »
    Will you lose weight eating in a deficit while consuming only junk? Sure.

    In other words, a calorie is a calorie. (Although this is a strawman, since no one says it's a good idea to consume only "junk" or even only non-nutrient dense foods. If I'm wrong, link a post.)
    Are you going to feel like crap and possibly suffer health issues in the long-term? Yes.

    Sure, who argues otherwise.
    All calories are not created equally.

    Does not follow. What you mean to say is that food is not food, or food items differ in many respects. We all know this--do you really think everyone here is completely ignorant?
  • AdieEve
    AdieEve Posts: 87 Member
    It's fine if people disagree. This is not intended to be a peer-reviewed scholarly article. It is, however, common sense for sustaining good health and weight loss. Anecdotally, I feel better when I eat well, and am more likely to stick to my weight loss regimen. When I'm eating junk, even within my calorie range, I get hungrier more often and tend to crave more junk.
    This article is just something to chew on, as it were.
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,270 Member
    _Waffle_ wrote: »
    Not really.
    WATCH THE SUGAR Sure, those Skittles seem harmless enough—after all, one bag has only 250 calories and 2.5 grams of fat. That sounds pretty tame for candy. But the 47 grams of sugar per serving has a cascade of negative side effects: You’ll get a sugar high and crash that will send your energy levels on a rollercoaster ride and set the stage for more craving down the line. Indulging those cravings can lead to weight gain and health problems like type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. Look for products with the fewest grams of sugar, and aim for less than 2.5 grams of sugar/100 calories. The World Health Organization recommends keeping sugar intake to no more than 10% of daily calories. For many folks that’s a limit of 50 grams of sugar per day. Aim much lower if you’re trying to shed pounds. Your best source of sugar is fresh fruit, which provides vitamins and minerals, along with fiber. If you must indulge in candy, enjoy it right after a tough workout. In the 20 to 30 minutes immediately following a run that’s longer or faster than you usually go, your body is especially efficient at metabolizing sugar. In fact, pairing these carbs with protein will help your muscles recover.
  • tigersword
    tigersword Posts: 8,059 Member
    edited December 2014
    A foot is not a foot because a foot of iron is totally different from a foot of plastic.
  • TheVirgoddess
    TheVirgoddess Posts: 4,535 Member
    In
  • AdieEve
    AdieEve Posts: 87 Member
    I would also like to point out that I have not said "a calorie is not a calorie". I said that not all calories are created equally, and this is explained well in the article provided. Nuance is lost on many people, it seems.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,282 Member
    AdieEve wrote: »
    The calories you consume will influence your satiety, energy levels (pertaining especially to blood glucose), and long-term health. Will you lose weight eating in a deficit while consuming only junk? Sure. Are you going to feel like crap and possibly suffer health issues in the long-term? Yes. All calories are not created equally.

    Do you seriously not realize how ad nauseam this topic is?

  • martyqueen52
    martyqueen52 Posts: 1,120 Member
    AdieEve wrote: »
    I would also like to point out that I have not said "a calorie is not a calorie". I said that not all calories are created equally, and this is explained well in the article provided. Nuance is lost on many people, it seems.

    Now you're just rambling. Nuance much, bruh?