Not eating for pleasure

123578

Replies

  • SnuggleSmacks
    SnuggleSmacks Posts: 3,732 Member
    Why? And how does it work out?

    I see quite often people in here stating that they now eat only to fuel their bodies, not for pleasure. Are those the same people who used to be overweight? And eat for pleasure then? How can you just switch? Isn't that a recipe for disaster...? Making it sooo easy to slip back to old habits? I am eating both for health and for pleasure now, trying to be sensible and kind to myself at the same time. I cook most of my meals from scratch, and they all taste delicious. I never eat anything I don't like, but I don't eat everything I like at once either.
    I don't eat for pleasure. That is not to say I don't enjoy eating once in a while. I eat when my blood sugar drops, or I get hungry. Then again, I grew up poor and now I live self sufficiently so food is not a luxury and never has been here. In my house, you eat what you need, no more. There are times the garden does poorly or the meat-raised animals don't grow as fast as you'd like so you have to stretch what you have until everything is straightened back out. Eating is just a necessity, not a hobby or a pastime. It's not supposed to be fun or exciting-it's supposed to keep you from dying.

    If that's the case, then I wonder how you put on the extra weight that you've now nearly (congrats!) lost?
  • DawnieB1977
    DawnieB1977 Posts: 4,248 Member
    JoRocka wrote: »
    ana3067 wrote: »
    Is food really that interesting? I think foodies are ridiculous. The reason anybody is overweight is because they get so excited about stimulating their taste buds. You see it all over the Thanksgiving threads here: "I ate 8000 calories today, YOLO!!" On a weight-loss forum. WTF.

    No, the reason people are overweight is because they eat too much. People seem to enjoy junk like dominoes, McDonald's, crappy American chocolate etc. I'd hardly call that stimulating your taste buds.

    There's no reason you can't enjoy tasty food. When food is really good you don't have to have huge portions of it.

    There are plenty of chefs who aren't overweight. There's a show here called The Great British Bake-Off. The woman, Mary Berry, on that is slim and she can still make yummy food.

    I'd much rather make myself a stir fry with ginger, chilli etc that shove some tasteless crap in the microwave.

    Personally I eat when I'm hungry, but I make sure it's foods I enjoy.

    I'll beg to differ. A&W Teen Burger and poutine are the two most delicious fast food items and they are extremely stimulating.

    I'm English and I've never had either, so I'll take your word for it :)

    you haven't lived yet if you haven't been to A and W.

    I don't even know what it is! Next time I go to the US (I assume that's where it is?) I'll go there :)
  • squirrelone
    squirrelone Posts: 58 Member
    I honestly would not want to live if I could not enjoy my food. I look forward to every single meal I eat.

    Eating things you don't enjoy, will not make you live longer. It will just make it feel that way.
  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 9,703 Member
    edited December 2014
    The Blue Zone (longest lived people on the planet) proves that pretty much any food preferences work and none of those groups do that by unilaterally understanding nutrition.
  • mamadon
    mamadon Posts: 1,422 Member
    edited December 2014
    Why? And how does it work out?

    I see quite often people in here stating that they now eat only to fuel their bodies, not for pleasure. Are those the same people who used to be overweight? And eat for pleasure then? How can you just switch? Isn't that a recipe for disaster...? Making it sooo easy to slip back to old habits? I am eating both for health and for pleasure now, trying to be sensible and kind to myself at the same time. I cook most of my meals from scratch, and they all taste delicious. I never eat anything I don't like, but I don't eat everything I like at once either.
    I don't eat for pleasure. That is not to say I don't enjoy eating once in a while. I eat when my blood sugar drops, or I get hungry. Then again, I grew up poor and now I live self sufficiently so food is not a luxury and never has been here. In my house, you eat what you need, no more. There are times the garden does poorly or the meat-raised animals don't grow as fast as you'd like so you have to stretch what you have until everything is straightened back out. Eating is just a necessity, not a hobby or a pastime. It's not supposed to be fun or exciting-it's supposed to keep you from dying.

    I'm sorry, but this seems very sad to me. I cant imagine a world where I didnt enjoy my food or the social aspect of a good meal with friends or family. Yes, it's main purpose is to sustain life, but why on earth can't it be enjoyable while doing that?
  • MarziPanda95
    MarziPanda95 Posts: 1,326 Member
    My comment being down on "foodies" was flippant, and I'm sorry if someone felt personally disrespected about their interests. That was not my intention. Of course, you should enjoy everything in life as much as possible. I'm a competent cook myself and make good food and like eating it.

    My points:
    1. the mechanics of weight loss are simple ("eat less, move more")
    2. yet fat people exist, despite the fact that being fat is a bad idea
    3. therefore, the problem is psychological

    When considering food (and everything), utility must come first. Ignoring calories and macros, whether as a food aficionado or mindless eater, is disastrous.

    Carry on!

    Nah, I think the problem is a lack of education. At school I wasn't taught that it was calories in and calories out. I was taught that vegetables are good and chocolate is bad. So whenever I tried to diet I'd end up maintaining my overweight state on 'healthy' foods because I was always taught that it's 2000 calories for a woman and 2500 for a man, way more than I should have had. I wasn't taught about BMR or BMI or TDEE. Many people don't understand how weight loss works and this is WHY they ignore calories and macros.
    Also, there's nothing wrong with 8000 calories of Christmas food if it's just one day. As long as someone doesn't eat that every day and only once a year, it's fine. :smile:
  • sheepotato
    sheepotato Posts: 600 Member
    edited December 2014

    Nah, I think the problem is a lack of education. At school I wasn't taught that it was calories in and calories out. I was taught that vegetables are good and chocolate is bad. So whenever I tried to diet I'd end up maintaining my overweight state on 'healthy' foods because I was always taught that it's 2000 calories for a woman and 2500 for a man, way more than I should have had. I wasn't taught about BMR or BMI or TDEE. Many people don't understand how weight loss works and this is WHY they ignore calories and macros.
    Also, there's nothing wrong with 8000 calories of Christmas food if it's just one day. As long as someone doesn't eat that every day and only once a year, it's fine. :smile:

    Very much this, I was in my mid 20's before I had any real concept of calories or even realized there was a formula for how much I should eat in a day. I didn't care to read nutrition labels because I had no idea what to do with the information that was given by them. I was always really active as a child/teen so I never needed to worry about how much I ate but once I hit college and a desk job I consistently gained weight without understanding why or how to stop it.
  • kommodevaran
    kommodevaran Posts: 17,890 Member
    What I initially wanted to discuss - although a lot of interesting stuff has come up - was whether eating healthy food you don't like, is a common reason people give up their diet/new lifestyle. People who have succeeded in their lifestyle change, do they (we) as a rule, aim to find healthy enough alternatives that also taste good and fit in with our everyday life? Shouldn't that be taught, preferably in school, but at least be adressed in the government nutrition leaflets? I feel the guidelines are way too "lean and green" for most people's taste, and unneccessarily so as well.
  • feisty_bucket
    feisty_bucket Posts: 1,047 Member
    edited December 2014
    whether eating healthy food you don't like, is a common reason people give up their diet/new lifestyle. People who have succeeded in their lifestyle change, do they (we) as a rule, aim to find healthy enough alternatives that also taste good and fit in with our everyday life?

    Not sure what other people eat/try to eat, but I get the impression a lot of (non-fitness-minded) folks think "eating healthy" means kale smoothies and bean sprouts and rice cakes and whatnot, 1980s "diet food" nonsense. So the whole idea seems repugnant to people who don't know any better.
    Shouldn't that be taught, preferably in school, but at least be addressed in the government nutrition leaflets? I feel the guidelines are way too "lean and green" for most people's taste, and unnecessarily so as well.

    Yeah, I think you're right. These "healthy eating initiatives" I see, seem to focus on things like home gardening and fresh produce and... kale smoothies. "Healthy snacks! Don't eat potato chips, instead eat... kale chips!" Argh.

    If they were serious, they'd be pushing TDEEs, calorie tracking, and basic bodyfat measurement with a tape measure. Simple, effective, dirt-cheap things that anyone can do and understand.
  • JoRocka
    JoRocka Posts: 17,525 Member
    ^^^^

    this.

    learning about calories and the value of a calorie and what macros were as a child/adult would have saved me an in sane amount of time.

    seriously- I remember a time where I thought calorie counting meant I turned into one of the vapid cheerleaders who were obsessing about their weight at 110 pounds in high school.

    So much negative bad information. Would have saved me a lot of time had I know better.

    also Fuk kale.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    edited December 2014
    What I initially wanted to discuss - although a lot of interesting stuff has come up - was whether eating healthy food you don't like, is a common reason people give up their diet/new lifestyle.

    I suspect so. I think it's common for people to have an idea of "diet food" that is basically not that tasty or interesting--I also think this is related to a kind of puritan idea that if it's too delicious it must be bad for you (see also descriptions of food as "sinful" or of eating as "being bad"). I get the impression that it's not that uncommon to have diaries that are all boneless skinless chicken breast with diet foods all the time, and I know years ago that was kind of my impression of what dieting involved, if not some weird set meals such as Beverly Hills Diet or whatever one saw in women's mags in the '80s. I also think this is why many people diet for a time and then go back to their former ways, as the diet isn't a sustainable way of eating, since there's no concern for taste. (I think it's normal for humans to care about taste--it's not like the effort to cook foods in the most tasty way is a new-fangled thing.)

    Of course, I think lots of stereotypically healthy foods (veggies) are important to eat whether one is dieting or not, but the trick is to find out how to make them delicious. I actually care more about eating delicious foods when I'm watching what I eat, as you can't just go eat something better if you waste calories on something disappointing.
  • giggitygoo
    giggitygoo Posts: 1,978 Member
    Why? And how does it work out?

    I see quite often people in here stating that they now eat only to fuel their bodies, not for pleasure. Are those the same people who used to be overweight? And eat for pleasure then? How can you just switch? Isn't that a recipe for disaster...? Making it sooo easy to slip back to old habits? I am eating both for health and for pleasure now, trying to be sensible and kind to myself at the same time. I cook most of my meals from scratch, and they all taste delicious. I never eat anything I don't like, but I don't eat everything I like at once either.

    I fully admit to not reading these responses, but clearly these people haven't figured out how to cook the food they "should" be eating properly. I have to eat more protein than I would prefer but a properly prepared, juicy chicken breast beats the pants off of something sad and overcooked every time.
  • For me, food is fuel, but I eat foods that I like. I am enjoying the taste of new things, like whole grain wild rices and Tabboulah, but I eat realistic portions and I am loosing weight and feeling better overall.
  • JoRocka
    JoRocka Posts: 17,525 Member
    Eating for pleasure is indulging in rich creamy ice cream, or donuts. Eating for my body is eating baked chicken breast. They are different things to me. I do not eat for pleasure. It is a chore and a task. I don't enjoy anything about it, except, I love being healthy and strong. But, the eating part is not enjoyable.

    because you can't have delicious chicken breasts?

    why not?
    breasts are always good.
  • justcat206
    justcat206 Posts: 716 Member
    I dunno - I've had some of my best lifting sessions after a monstrous bacon guacamole burger. I also happen to really enjoy a good salad. And I can make a tiny piece of super high quality cheesecake last half an hour and savor every bite. When I first started my weight loss journey I saw it as a choice between eating and not eating. I chose not eating and wound up anorexic. Then I started eating everything I wanted and gained a ton of weight. But I, too, thought healthy eating was just kale and juice fasts and that was boring. I've finally come to realise that I can make my macros fit all kinds of delicious dishes and I've learned how to savor my splurges. So I think it's totally possible to eat to fuel my body AND savor my food. Meatloaf and veggies might take a lot more effort to prepare than ordering pizza, but I will really enjoy it once it's fixed, and I know I'll feel better the next day, too.
  • SnuggleSmacks
    SnuggleSmacks Posts: 3,732 Member
    These things are not mutually exclusive. Properly prepared chicken breast with the right mix of herbs/spices/salt/fats can taste extremely indulgent. If you become a connoisseur of seasonings, you can make almost anything taste fantastic.
  • Kevalicious99
    Kevalicious99 Posts: 1,131 Member
    I eat chocolate for pleasure .. otherwise no. It is just what needs to happen to prevent death.