Overweight Personal Trainers - What's your thoughts?

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  • WalkingAlong
    WalkingAlong Posts: 4,926 Member
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    sofaking6 wrote: »
    bos10fit wrote: »
    I am going to be blunt and maybe that's because I AM a personal trainer.

    As a trainer, you should care about your outward appearance. Seriously, how the hell do you expect to pick up clients when you don't look the part?

    How can I coach someone when my main point is, "do as I say, not as I do." Not only as trainers are we supposed to help our clients, we are supposed to inspire by setting a good example.

    Is it fair to ask my clients to put in work to help their physical appearance when I don't for mine.

    That is bobo.

    And for those of you who are talking group x aka zumba, etc.... that is NOTHING compared to training. Two different areas and two different certifications. Anyone can get certified in Group X. It literally takes ONE day. Your job isn't to train clients. You're supposed to teach a class. Two different things that cannot be compared. Besides, go to a fitness convention and look at everyone in Zumba. That's all I have to say about that.

    You can read a book all day about physical exercise but if you can't apply it when it comes to clients, what is the point?

    My suggestion is to sit down with a few and discuss goals and experience. Pick someone who is tailored to your needs and your body type.

    This is another thing - the super fit but horrible trainer I mentioned? She was snobby and judgemental and her attitude that I was less worthy than others because of my weight shone through. This post reminded me of her.
    :D Another like.
  • jayyedel
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    Anyone can be a personal trainer but just not mine. I need someone who follows his own advice
  • FatFreeFrolicking
    FatFreeFrolicking Posts: 4,252 Member
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    I know plenty of people who are overweight/obese and more active than individuals who are thin. As long as the PT is able to function (walk, wipe their own butt, feed themselves, etc)., I don't see the issue.

    Overweight/obese doesn't equal lack of knowledge about wellness/exercise.
  • DawnEmbers
    DawnEmbers Posts: 2,451 Member
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    I kind of want an overweight yoga instructor. I've tried yoga briefly but have a hard time figuring out some poses because my stomach gets in the way. Would be nice if someone knew of ways to work around that while I work on reducing my body fat. Or to have a visual, as it's just hard to watch the very fit instructor and mirror it with my still not fit, in progress self.
  • FatFreeFrolicking
    FatFreeFrolicking Posts: 4,252 Member
    edited January 2015
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    jayyedel wrote: »
    Anyone can be a personal trainer but just not mine. I need someone who follows his own advice

    So a PT who is overweight/obese can't actively be trying to lose weight/become healthy? Pretty judgmental and presumptuous.
  • AglaeaC
    AglaeaC Posts: 1,974 Member
    edited January 2015
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    jayyedel wrote: »
    Anyone can be a personal trainer but just not mine. I need someone who follows his own advice

    So basically they followed their own advice only when they have hit maintenance? Eyeroll.
  • astrose00
    astrose00 Posts: 754 Member
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    MKEgal wrote: »
    I would give even more credence to a personal trainer (etc.) who had been obese and overcame that, got healthy. That's what I'm hoping to do. 51637601.png

    I never thought about it this way but that does make sense. I thought about becoming a PT (for fun, part time) when I reach my goal weight and body and worried that somehow I'd be viewed negatively because I've been overweight. What better person to train you than one who has actually experienced what you are going through (struggles and successes).
  • dbmata
    dbmata Posts: 12,950 Member
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    astrose00 wrote: »
    MKEgal wrote: »
    I would give even more credence to a personal trainer (etc.) who had been obese and overcame that, got healthy. That's what I'm hoping to do. 51637601.png

    I never thought about it this way but that does make sense. I thought about becoming a PT (for fun, part time) when I reach my goal weight and body and worried that somehow I'd be viewed negatively because I've been overweight. What better person to train you than one who has actually experienced what you are going through (struggles and successes).
    I'd argue a better person would be one who has gotten a high level of education in training, and possibly nutrition, and has then helped a large group of fatties get unfat.
    I'd say that's a far better choice of service provider than someone who was overweight at one point, but is otherwise green.
  • iheartinsanity
    iheartinsanity Posts: 205 Member
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    jayyedel wrote: »
    Anyone can be a personal trainer but just not mine. I need someone who follows his own advice
    Most everyone is going to disagree with you, but I won't.

    I understand thyroid issues, and other health issues...but if you're going to talk the talk, walk the walk. I've had all kinds of set backs in the past 5+ years of losing major weight, but if you're choosing such a career, I agree that you should look somewhat fit. I can see 10lbs. over because we all need wiggle room but really obese? I can't take the person seriously.

  • BrotherBill913
    BrotherBill913 Posts: 661 Member
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    EWJLang wrote: »
    Depends on what goals you want the trainer to help you achieve. If weight loss is part of your goals, you may want a trainer who has lost or is losing fat themselves. If you are a large person who wants to focus on fitness/health at any size without weightloss pressure, a heavy but active trainer might be great, as many larger folks feel pressured and shamed about their weight to the point that they avoid the gym. In that situation, a bigger PT might give the kind of support that the client needs for embracing a new, more active mindset.

    Also, if you are looking for a PT to help you with powerlifting or other intensive strength work, chances are that you may get the best help from someone who APPEARS to be overweight/fat.

    Male world champion powerlifter: IPF_World_Champion_Dean_Bowring_performing_the_three_Powerlifting_moves.jpg

    Female Olympic Powerlifter: Weightlifting-Womens-+75kg-London-2012-Olympics-Results.jpg


    ^^^^^^^ Mama June is back in town????????????

  • Qskim
    Qskim Posts: 1,145 Member
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    I had two trainers. One fit, one not so. For the time I was there, every one of the unfit trainer's consistent clients reached their goals. (So did the fit trainer's - a former weight loser and lifter who kept it off for 20years).

    When I went in as a noob, it was like Jorocks said...I could tell he'd been fit. Over time, I found out that he had nerve damage from his former lifting days. He was still passionate about what he taught just could no longer do it himself. Experience shone through. I absolutely trusted them both.
  • ElliottTN
    ElliottTN Posts: 1,614 Member
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    If there is a fat PT that is highly reviewed, highly recommended by people I respect then I'd absolutely give them a go.

    If however I can't afford the highly reviewed/highly recommended fat PT and had to pick of just a few encounters with them then I would probably lean towards the more in shape ones. Odds would then be in my favor in finding one. At the very least it gives me an indication that they have had at least one successful client which would be themselves.

    Not saying there aren't obese PTs that are really good and in shape PTs that could find their way out of a box, that's not how the world works.
  • BrotherBill913
    BrotherBill913 Posts: 661 Member
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    Look at it this way, in school it's common knowledge that the gym coaches are all over weight, shop teachers are missing a finger and the home ec ladies????? Yeah they're all divorced with cats........ I liked that nice cat lady .... lol.......
  • AglaeaC
    AglaeaC Posts: 1,974 Member
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    dbmata wrote: »
    astrose00 wrote: »
    MKEgal wrote: »
    I would give even more credence to a personal trainer (etc.) who had been obese and overcame that, got healthy. That's what I'm hoping to do. 51637601.png

    I never thought about it this way but that does make sense. I thought about becoming a PT (for fun, part time) when I reach my goal weight and body and worried that somehow I'd be viewed negatively because I've been overweight. What better person to train you than one who has actually experienced what you are going through (struggles and successes).
    I'd argue a better person would be one who has gotten a high level of education in training, and possibly nutrition, and has then helped a large group of fatties get unfat.
    I'd say that's a far better choice of service provider than someone who was overweight at one point, but is otherwise green.

    Not mutually exclusive.
  • kaseyr1505
    kaseyr1505 Posts: 624 Member
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    No, I would not pay for a personal trainer who is noticeably obese. To me, a personal trainer's body is a part of their resume. If they were overweight/obese at one point, and are now fit, I wouldn't have any issues going to them.

    I wouldn't trust someone with frizzy, unkempt hair to do mine. I wouldn't trust someone to be my personal stylist if they didn't look put together, and I wouldn't trust a trainer who did not look fit. I guess this makes me judgemental, and I'm okay with that.
  • astrose00
    astrose00 Posts: 754 Member
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    AglaeaC wrote: »
    dbmata wrote: »
    astrose00 wrote: »
    MKEgal wrote: »
    I would give even more credence to a personal trainer (etc.) who had been obese and overcame that, got healthy. That's what I'm hoping to do. 51637601.png

    I never thought about it this way but that does make sense. I thought about becoming a PT (for fun, part time) when I reach my goal weight and body and worried that somehow I'd be viewed negatively because I've been overweight. What better person to train you than one who has actually experienced what you are going through (struggles and successes).
    I'd argue a better person would be one who has gotten a high level of education in training, and possibly nutrition, and has then helped a large group of fatties get unfat.
    I'd say that's a far better choice of service provider than someone who was overweight at one point, but is otherwise green.

    Not mutually exclusive.

    ^^^Cosign
  • astrose00
    astrose00 Posts: 754 Member
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    sofaking6 wrote: »
    bos10fit wrote: »
    I am going to be blunt and maybe that's because I AM a personal trainer.

    As a trainer, you should care about your outward appearance. Seriously, how the hell do you expect to pick up clients when you don't look the part?

    How can I coach someone when my main point is, "do as I say, not as I do." Not only as trainers are we supposed to help our clients, we are supposed to inspire by setting a good example.

    Is it fair to ask my clients to put in work to help their physical appearance when I don't for mine.

    That is bobo.

    And for those of you who are talking group x aka zumba, etc.... that is NOTHING compared to training. Two different areas and two different certifications. Anyone can get certified in Group X. It literally takes ONE day. Your job isn't to train clients. You're supposed to teach a class. Two different things that cannot be compared. Besides, go to a fitness convention and look at everyone in Zumba. That's all I have to say about that.

    You can read a book all day about physical exercise but if you can't apply it when it comes to clients, what is the point?

    My suggestion is to sit down with a few and discuss goals and experience. Pick someone who is tailored to your needs and your body type.

    This is another thing - the super fit but horrible trainer I mentioned? She was snobby and judgemental and her attitude that I was less worthy than others because of my weight shone through. This post reminded me of her.
    :D Another like.

    Ditto. That was stank-a-dank-dank.
  • Hornsby
    Hornsby Posts: 10,322 Member
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    kaseyr1505 wrote: »
    No, I would not pay for a personal trainer who is noticeably obese. To me, a personal trainer's body is a part of their resume. If they were overweight/obese at one point, and are now fit, I wouldn't have any issues going to them.

    I wouldn't trust someone with frizzy, unkempt hair to do mine. I wouldn't trust someone to be my personal stylist if they didn't look put together, and I wouldn't trust a trainer who did not look fit. I guess this makes me judgemental, and I'm okay with that.

    It's only judgmental to those on a pedestal.
  • ThatMouse
    ThatMouse Posts: 229 Member
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    I'd personally feel more inclined towards an in-shape PT. I'm a person who likes self-experimentation and if they can tell me and show me what worked for them, that's excellent.

    However, if they're overweight but can help me with my goals - lift with proper form, create programs that meet my performance training goals, give me actionable advice when it comes to nutrition - then I can overlook their weight.

    To a degree.

    You don't have to be super-active to be in shape. I believe that the personal brand of a PT should involve them staying on top of their nutrition to stay in shape. Sure, maybe they were a powerlifter and had an injury which then stopped them lifting and now they can't do as much. However, I would prefer to give my money to someone who, all things being equal, kept their weight under control.

    But again - if they're professional, get me results and work well with me, I'll hire them in a heartbeat. But if I find them disgustingly fat and unhygienic, you can bet I don't want to be working in close proximity with them.
  • gelar93
    gelar93 Posts: 160
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    Codefox wrote: »
    Anyone can be a personal trainer. Just not mine.

    Ahaha well said. You can technically be a PT regardless of your weight. But hey if you couldn't take care of yourself, why would I trust you? If I had the money to afford a personal trainer, I'd go with someone I could look up to.