Any out there on meds that make you gain weight?

145679

Replies

  • MrM27 wrote: »
    _Ben wrote: »
    Pharmacist here. OP Im not seeing in this thread specifically what you are taking (possibly missed it) but if you want to send me a PM, there may be an alternative medication that might work a bit better for you.

    Also for those who say medications can or cant cause weight loss, you're simply wrong. Medications can alter your metabolism, water retention, salt/electrolyte retention, etc. If anyone would like, Id be more than happy to explain in further detail

    So if they alter your metabolism and lower your TDEE would the fat gain be from the meds directly or is it from a reduction in TDEE and eating above that?

    Also, yes, please explain in further detail with supporting evidence.

    If I hit you over the head with a hammer, just hypothetically of course, since I'm not a violent person, would the pain be from being hit in the head with a hammer, or from the inflammation caused by the burst blood vessels and fibers under the skin?

    Sometimes people talk in shorthand. It's easier to say, "This medication caused weight gain," than "This medication caused my metabolism to slow which resulted in unknowingly overeating which resulted in weight gain."

    If you want to fix the problem then that is a very important distinction.

    If I take a drug and then gain weight I could say that the drug caused weight gain. I have to take that drug so there is nothing I can do about the weight gain. That is wrong.

    If someone tells me the drug can not cause weight gain but it does alter my appetite or cause me to be less active. If I eat more calories than I burn as a result THAT is what causes the weight gain. Then I know how to fix the problem. Adjust calories intake or increase calorie output. It simple even if its not easy.

    The drug did not cause the weight gain, too many calories cause the weight gain.


    It's simple, really?

    Riddle me this…

    I gained 111 lbs within 3 years on AD's all while following a strict diet given by a registered dietician, counting calories, AND being a competitive gymnast who trained 5 times a week 3 hours each practice. If you know anything about gymnastics, we are pushed to our limit every time we train. It's a brutal sport. There's a reason it's one of the top most dangerous sports.

    I wasn't eating more calories. I was eating less calories than I did before starting AD's. I wasn't inactive. I was more active than I was before starting AD's.

    So no, your whole "altering appetite, being less active, and not adjusting calorie intake" didn't apply to me.

    Do NOT try to tell me the medications didn't cause my weight gain when I was 95-97 freaking pounds my ENTIRE life before beginning AD's (oh and did I mention I couldn't gain a single pound no matter how much I tried until I began AD's… That's not a coincidence)

    What you are saying is impossible to the known laws of physics on this planet.

    You can not eat less calories than you burn and gain weight other than water retention.

    Weight is the gravitational force on your mass. If you want to change your weight you have to change your mass.

    In physics there is something called the Mass Energy Equivalence. Energy=Mass and they change in relation to each other. They equation for this E=mc2. A guy named Einstein wrote that. Maybe you have heard of him.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass–energy_equivalence

    To increase the mass of a system, in this case your body, you have to have a surplus of energy. To decrease it you have to have a deficit of energy. Most people use the calorie as the unit of measurement to calculate intake and expenditure. Or we simplify it as CICO. CI<CO=weight loss. CI>CO=weight gain. Simple.

    So now you can see that if you burned more than you ate you can not have added mass and increased your weight.


    You're right. I'm wrong. My medical team are liars. I'm just making it all up because I wanted to gain 100+ pounds. *eyeroll*

    Its not me trying to be right. I was trying to explain why we are saying that medications and medical issues can change energy expenditures but can not cause the actual weight gain. That comes from eating to much.

    The medication can change your appetite or make you want to move less or retain water but it cant make you gain weight by itself.

    If people understand the difference then they can manage their weight better.


    Yes you are trying and not listening to anyone else. My cancer med absolutely slows my metabolism thus weight gain. I work harder to combat that, and I don't need a misinformed know it all to tell me differently. =)

  • PammieSuzyQ
    PammieSuzyQ Posts: 100 Member
    MrM27 wrote: »
    _Ben wrote: »
    Pharmacist here. OP Im not seeing in this thread specifically what you are taking (possibly missed it) but if you want to send me a PM, there may be an alternative medication that might work a bit better for you.

    Also for those who say medications can or cant cause weight loss, you're simply wrong. Medications can alter your metabolism, water retention, salt/electrolyte retention, etc. If anyone would like, Id be more than happy to explain in further detail

    So if they alter your metabolism and lower your TDEE would the fat gain be from the meds directly or is it from a reduction in TDEE and eating above that?

    Also, yes, please explain in further detail with supporting evidence.

    If I hit you over the head with a hammer, just hypothetically of course, since I'm not a violent person, would the pain be from being hit in the head with a hammer, or from the inflammation caused by the burst blood vessels and fibers under the skin?

    Sometimes people talk in shorthand. It's easier to say, "This medication caused weight gain," than "This medication caused my metabolism to slow which resulted in unknowingly overeating which resulted in weight gain."

    If you want to fix the problem then that is a very important distinction.

    If I take a drug and then gain weight I could say that the drug caused weight gain. I have to take that drug so there is nothing I can do about the weight gain. That is wrong.

    If someone tells me the drug can not cause weight gain but it does alter my appetite or cause me to be less active. If I eat more calories than I burn as a result THAT is what causes the weight gain. Then I know how to fix the problem. Adjust calories intake or increase calorie output. It simple even if its not easy.

    The drug did not cause the weight gain, too many calories cause the weight gain.


    It's simple, really?

    Riddle me this…

    I gained 111 lbs within 3 years on AD's all while following a strict diet given by a registered dietician, counting calories, AND being a competitive gymnast who trained 5 times a week 3 hours each practice. If you know anything about gymnastics, we are pushed to our limit every time we train. It's a brutal sport. There's a reason it's one of the top most dangerous sports.

    I wasn't eating more calories. I was eating less calories than I did before starting AD's. I wasn't inactive. I was more active than I was before starting AD's.

    So no, your whole "altering appetite, being less active, and not adjusting calorie intake" didn't apply to me.

    Do NOT try to tell me the medications didn't cause my weight gain when I was 95-97 freaking pounds my ENTIRE life before beginning AD's (oh and did I mention I couldn't gain a single pound no matter how much I tried until I began AD's… That's not a coincidence)

    What you are saying is impossible to the known laws of physics on this planet.

    You can not eat less calories than you burn and gain weight other than water retention.

    Weight is the gravitational force on your mass. If you want to change your weight you have to change your mass.

    In physics there is something called the Mass Energy Equivalence. Energy=Mass and they change in relation to each other. They equation for this E=mc2. A guy named Einstein wrote that. Maybe you have heard of him.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass–energy_equivalence

    To increase the mass of a system, in this case your body, you have to have a surplus of energy. To decrease it you have to have a deficit of energy. Most people use the calorie as the unit of measurement to calculate intake and expenditure. Or we simplify it as CICO. CI<CO=weight loss. CI>CO=weight gain. Simple.

    So now you can see that if you burned more than you ate you can not have added mass and increased your weight.


    You're right. I'm wrong. My medical team are liars. I'm just making it all up because I wanted to gain 100+ pounds. *eyeroll*

    Its not me trying to be right. I was trying to explain why we are saying that medications and medical issues can change energy expenditures but can not cause the actual weight gain. That comes from eating to much.

    The medication can change your appetite or make you want to move less or retain water but it cant make you gain weight by itself.

    If people understand the difference then they can manage their weight better.


    Yes you are trying and not listening to anyone else. My cancer med absolutely slows my metabolism thus weight gain. I work harder to combat that, and I don't need a misinformed know it all to tell me differently. =)

    You tell 'em honey!!! *applause*

  • mustgetmuscles1
    mustgetmuscles1 Posts: 3,348 Member
    MrM27 wrote: »
    _Ben wrote: »
    Pharmacist here. OP Im not seeing in this thread specifically what you are taking (possibly missed it) but if you want to send me a PM, there may be an alternative medication that might work a bit better for you.

    Also for those who say medications can or cant cause weight loss, you're simply wrong. Medications can alter your metabolism, water retention, salt/electrolyte retention, etc. If anyone would like, Id be more than happy to explain in further detail

    So if they alter your metabolism and lower your TDEE would the fat gain be from the meds directly or is it from a reduction in TDEE and eating above that?

    Also, yes, please explain in further detail with supporting evidence.

    If I hit you over the head with a hammer, just hypothetically of course, since I'm not a violent person, would the pain be from being hit in the head with a hammer, or from the inflammation caused by the burst blood vessels and fibers under the skin?

    Sometimes people talk in shorthand. It's easier to say, "This medication caused weight gain," than "This medication caused my metabolism to slow which resulted in unknowingly overeating which resulted in weight gain."

    If you want to fix the problem then that is a very important distinction.

    If I take a drug and then gain weight I could say that the drug caused weight gain. I have to take that drug so there is nothing I can do about the weight gain. That is wrong.

    If someone tells me the drug can not cause weight gain but it does alter my appetite or cause me to be less active. If I eat more calories than I burn as a result THAT is what causes the weight gain. Then I know how to fix the problem. Adjust calories intake or increase calorie output. It simple even if its not easy.

    The drug did not cause the weight gain, too many calories cause the weight gain.


    It's simple, really?

    Riddle me this…

    I gained 111 lbs within 3 years on AD's all while following a strict diet given by a registered dietician, counting calories, AND being a competitive gymnast who trained 5 times a week 3 hours each practice. If you know anything about gymnastics, we are pushed to our limit every time we train. It's a brutal sport. There's a reason it's one of the top most dangerous sports.

    I wasn't eating more calories. I was eating less calories than I did before starting AD's. I wasn't inactive. I was more active than I was before starting AD's.

    So no, your whole "altering appetite, being less active, and not adjusting calorie intake" didn't apply to me.

    Do NOT try to tell me the medications didn't cause my weight gain when I was 95-97 freaking pounds my ENTIRE life before beginning AD's (oh and did I mention I couldn't gain a single pound no matter how much I tried until I began AD's… That's not a coincidence)

    What you are saying is impossible to the known laws of physics on this planet.

    You can not eat less calories than you burn and gain weight other than water retention.

    Weight is the gravitational force on your mass. If you want to change your weight you have to change your mass.

    In physics there is something called the Mass Energy Equivalence. Energy=Mass and they change in relation to each other. They equation for this E=mc2. A guy named Einstein wrote that. Maybe you have heard of him.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass–energy_equivalence

    To increase the mass of a system, in this case your body, you have to have a surplus of energy. To decrease it you have to have a deficit of energy. Most people use the calorie as the unit of measurement to calculate intake and expenditure. Or we simplify it as CICO. CI<CO=weight loss. CI>CO=weight gain. Simple.

    So now you can see that if you burned more than you ate you can not have added mass and increased your weight.


    You're right. I'm wrong. My medical team are liars. I'm just making it all up because I wanted to gain 100+ pounds. *eyeroll*

    Its not me trying to be right. I was trying to explain why we are saying that medications and medical issues can change energy expenditures but can not cause the actual weight gain. That comes from eating to much.

    The medication can change your appetite or make you want to move less or retain water but it cant make you gain weight by itself.

    If people understand the difference then they can manage their weight better.


    Yes you are trying and not listening to anyone else. My cancer med absolutely slows my metabolism thus weight gain. I work harder to combat that, and I don't need a misinformed know it all to tell me differently. =)

    Why would I listen to someone tell me that a pill increased their weight? They took a pill and increased their mass beyond the amount of energy it contained. They created mass from nothing. That is not possible.

    Slows your metabolism is accurate. Causes weight gain would not be. It is accurate to say this pill slows my metabolism. It is not accurate to say this pill causes weight gain. So if it slowed your metabolism, or your energy expenditure, then you would have to adjust your energy intake or you would gain weight. Its simple.


  • BramageOMG
    BramageOMG Posts: 319 Member
    Maybe you can wish away your fat. Its too bad excuses don't burn calories. There would be more successful people here. Reminds me of the 3 fat ladies that showed up at the Gym on 1/3. By 1/5 it was down to 2 (fattest one quit coming) and now all 3 are gone. "I tried the gym, it didn't work".... Good luck
  • MrM27 wrote: »
    _Ben wrote: »
    Pharmacist here. OP Im not seeing in this thread specifically what you are taking (possibly missed it) but if you want to send me a PM, there may be an alternative medication that might work a bit better for you.

    Also for those who say medications can or cant cause weight loss, you're simply wrong. Medications can alter your metabolism, water retention, salt/electrolyte retention, etc. If anyone would like, Id be more than happy to explain in further detail

    So if they alter your metabolism and lower your TDEE would the fat gain be from the meds directly or is it from a reduction in TDEE and eating above that?

    Also, yes, please explain in further detail with supporting evidence.

    If I hit you over the head with a hammer, just hypothetically of course, since I'm not a violent person, would the pain be from being hit in the head with a hammer, or from the inflammation caused by the burst blood vessels and fibers under the skin?

    Sometimes people talk in shorthand. It's easier to say, "This medication caused weight gain," than "This medication caused my metabolism to slow which resulted in unknowingly overeating which resulted in weight gain."

    If you want to fix the problem then that is a very important distinction.

    If I take a drug and then gain weight I could say that the drug caused weight gain. I have to take that drug so there is nothing I can do about the weight gain. That is wrong.

    If someone tells me the drug can not cause weight gain but it does alter my appetite or cause me to be less active. If I eat more calories than I burn as a result THAT is what causes the weight gain. Then I know how to fix the problem. Adjust calories intake or increase calorie output. It simple even if its not easy.

    The drug did not cause the weight gain, too many calories cause the weight gain.


    It's simple, really?

    Riddle me this…

    I gained 111 lbs within 3 years on AD's all while following a strict diet given by a registered dietician, counting calories, AND being a competitive gymnast who trained 5 times a week 3 hours each practice. If you know anything about gymnastics, we are pushed to our limit every time we train. It's a brutal sport. There's a reason it's one of the top most dangerous sports.

    I wasn't eating more calories. I was eating less calories than I did before starting AD's. I wasn't inactive. I was more active than I was before starting AD's.

    So no, your whole "altering appetite, being less active, and not adjusting calorie intake" didn't apply to me.

    Do NOT try to tell me the medications didn't cause my weight gain when I was 95-97 freaking pounds my ENTIRE life before beginning AD's (oh and did I mention I couldn't gain a single pound no matter how much I tried until I began AD's… That's not a coincidence)

    What you are saying is impossible to the known laws of physics on this planet.

    You can not eat less calories than you burn and gain weight other than water retention.

    Weight is the gravitational force on your mass. If you want to change your weight you have to change your mass.

    In physics there is something called the Mass Energy Equivalence. Energy=Mass and they change in relation to each other. They equation for this E=mc2. A guy named Einstein wrote that. Maybe you have heard of him.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass–energy_equivalence

    To increase the mass of a system, in this case your body, you have to have a surplus of energy. To decrease it you have to have a deficit of energy. Most people use the calorie as the unit of measurement to calculate intake and expenditure. Or we simplify it as CICO. CI<CO=weight loss. CI>CO=weight gain. Simple.

    So now you can see that if you burned more than you ate you can not have added mass and increased your weight.


    You're right. I'm wrong. My medical team are liars. I'm just making it all up because I wanted to gain 100+ pounds. *eyeroll*

    Its not me trying to be right. I was trying to explain why we are saying that medications and medical issues can change energy expenditures but can not cause the actual weight gain. That comes from eating to much.

    The medication can change your appetite or make you want to move less or retain water but it cant make you gain weight by itself.

    If people understand the difference then they can manage their weight better.


    Yes you are trying and not listening to anyone else. My cancer med absolutely slows my metabolism thus weight gain. I work harder to combat that, and I don't need a misinformed know it all to tell me differently. =)

    Why would I listen to someone tell me that a pill increased their weight? They took a pill and increased their mass beyond the amount of energy it contained. They created mass from nothing. That is not possible.

    Slows your metabolism is accurate. Causes weight gain would not be. It is accurate to say this pill slows my metabolism. It is not accurate to say this pill causes weight gain. So if it slowed your metabolism, or your energy expenditure, then you would have to adjust your energy intake or you would gain weight. Its simple.

    MrM27 wrote: »
    _Ben wrote: »
    Pharmacist here. OP Im not seeing in this thread specifically what you are taking (possibly missed it) but if you want to send me a PM, there may be an alternative medication that might work a bit better for you.

    Also for those who say medications can or cant cause weight loss, you're simply wrong. Medications can alter your metabolism, water retention, salt/electrolyte retention, etc. If anyone would like, Id be more than happy to explain in further detail

    So if they alter your metabolism and lower your TDEE would the fat gain be from the meds directly or is it from a reduction in TDEE and eating above that?

    Also, yes, please explain in further detail with supporting evidence.

    If I hit you over the head with a hammer, just hypothetically of course, since I'm not a violent person, would the pain be from being hit in the head with a hammer, or from the inflammation caused by the burst blood vessels and fibers under the skin?

    Sometimes people talk in shorthand. It's easier to say, "This medication caused weight gain," than "This medication caused my metabolism to slow which resulted in unknowingly overeating which resulted in weight gain."

    If you want to fix the problem then that is a very important distinction.

    If I take a drug and then gain weight I could say that the drug caused weight gain. I have to take that drug so there is nothing I can do about the weight gain. That is wrong.

    If someone tells me the drug can not cause weight gain but it does alter my appetite or cause me to be less active. If I eat more calories than I burn as a result THAT is what causes the weight gain. Then I know how to fix the problem. Adjust calories intake or increase calorie output. It simple even if its not easy.

    The drug did not cause the weight gain, too many calories cause the weight gain.


    It's simple, really?

    Riddle me this…

    I gained 111 lbs within 3 years on AD's all while following a strict diet given by a registered dietician, counting calories, AND being a competitive gymnast who trained 5 times a week 3 hours each practice. If you know anything about gymnastics, we are pushed to our limit every time we train. It's a brutal sport. There's a reason it's one of the top most dangerous sports.

    I wasn't eating more calories. I was eating less calories than I did before starting AD's. I wasn't inactive. I was more active than I was before starting AD's.

    So no, your whole "altering appetite, being less active, and not adjusting calorie intake" didn't apply to me.

    Do NOT try to tell me the medications didn't cause my weight gain when I was 95-97 freaking pounds my ENTIRE life before beginning AD's (oh and did I mention I couldn't gain a single pound no matter how much I tried until I began AD's… That's not a coincidence)

    What you are saying is impossible to the known laws of physics on this planet.

    You can not eat less calories than you burn and gain weight other than water retention.

    Weight is the gravitational force on your mass. If you want to change your weight you have to change your mass.

    In physics there is something called the Mass Energy Equivalence. Energy=Mass and they change in relation to each other. They equation for this E=mc2. A guy named Einstein wrote that. Maybe you have heard of him.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass–energy_equivalence

    To increase the mass of a system, in this case your body, you have to have a surplus of energy. To decrease it you have to have a deficit of energy. Most people use the calorie as the unit of measurement to calculate intake and expenditure. Or we simplify it as CICO. CI<CO=weight loss. CI>CO=weight gain. Simple.

    So now you can see that if you burned more than you ate you can not have added mass and increased your weight.


    You're right. I'm wrong. My medical team are liars. I'm just making it all up because I wanted to gain 100+ pounds. *eyeroll*

    Its not me trying to be right. I was trying to explain why we are saying that medications and medical issues can change energy expenditures but can not cause the actual weight gain. That comes from eating to much.

    The medication can change your appetite or make you want to move less or retain water but it cant make you gain weight by itself.

    If people understand the difference then they can manage their weight better.


    Yes you are trying and not listening to anyone else. My cancer med absolutely slows my metabolism thus weight gain. I work harder to combat that, and I don't need a misinformed know it all to tell me differently. =)

    Why would I listen to someone tell me that a pill increased their weight? They took a pill and increased their mass beyond the amount of energy it contained. They created mass from nothing. That is not possible.

    Slows your metabolism is accurate. Causes weight gain would not be. It is accurate to say this pill slows my metabolism. It is not accurate to say this pill causes weight gain. So if it slowed your metabolism, or your energy expenditure, then you would have to adjust your energy intake or you would gain weight. Its simple.



    I said that.

    Try_Reading_jpeg.JPG
  • mustgetmuscles1
    mustgetmuscles1 Posts: 3,348 Member
    MrM27 wrote: »
    _Ben wrote: »
    Pharmacist here. OP Im not seeing in this thread specifically what you are taking (possibly missed it) but if you want to send me a PM, there may be an alternative medication that might work a bit better for you.

    Also for those who say medications can or cant cause weight loss, you're simply wrong. Medications can alter your metabolism, water retention, salt/electrolyte retention, etc. If anyone would like, Id be more than happy to explain in further detail

    So if they alter your metabolism and lower your TDEE would the fat gain be from the meds directly or is it from a reduction in TDEE and eating above that?

    Also, yes, please explain in further detail with supporting evidence.

    If I hit you over the head with a hammer, just hypothetically of course, since I'm not a violent person, would the pain be from being hit in the head with a hammer, or from the inflammation caused by the burst blood vessels and fibers under the skin?

    Sometimes people talk in shorthand. It's easier to say, "This medication caused weight gain," than "This medication caused my metabolism to slow which resulted in unknowingly overeating which resulted in weight gain."

    If you want to fix the problem then that is a very important distinction.

    If I take a drug and then gain weight I could say that the drug caused weight gain. I have to take that drug so there is nothing I can do about the weight gain. That is wrong.

    If someone tells me the drug can not cause weight gain but it does alter my appetite or cause me to be less active. If I eat more calories than I burn as a result THAT is what causes the weight gain. Then I know how to fix the problem. Adjust calories intake or increase calorie output. It simple even if its not easy.

    The drug did not cause the weight gain, too many calories cause the weight gain.


    It's simple, really?

    Riddle me this…

    I gained 111 lbs within 3 years on AD's all while following a strict diet given by a registered dietician, counting calories, AND being a competitive gymnast who trained 5 times a week 3 hours each practice. If you know anything about gymnastics, we are pushed to our limit every time we train. It's a brutal sport. There's a reason it's one of the top most dangerous sports.

    I wasn't eating more calories. I was eating less calories than I did before starting AD's. I wasn't inactive. I was more active than I was before starting AD's.

    So no, your whole "altering appetite, being less active, and not adjusting calorie intake" didn't apply to me.

    Do NOT try to tell me the medications didn't cause my weight gain when I was 95-97 freaking pounds my ENTIRE life before beginning AD's (oh and did I mention I couldn't gain a single pound no matter how much I tried until I began AD's… That's not a coincidence)

    What you are saying is impossible to the known laws of physics on this planet.

    You can not eat less calories than you burn and gain weight other than water retention.

    Weight is the gravitational force on your mass. If you want to change your weight you have to change your mass.

    In physics there is something called the Mass Energy Equivalence. Energy=Mass and they change in relation to each other. They equation for this E=mc2. A guy named Einstein wrote that. Maybe you have heard of him.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass–energy_equivalence

    To increase the mass of a system, in this case your body, you have to have a surplus of energy. To decrease it you have to have a deficit of energy. Most people use the calorie as the unit of measurement to calculate intake and expenditure. Or we simplify it as CICO. CI<CO=weight loss. CI>CO=weight gain. Simple.

    So now you can see that if you burned more than you ate you can not have added mass and increased your weight.


    You're right. I'm wrong. My medical team are liars. I'm just making it all up because I wanted to gain 100+ pounds. *eyeroll*

    Its not me trying to be right. I was trying to explain why we are saying that medications and medical issues can change energy expenditures but can not cause the actual weight gain. That comes from eating to much.

    The medication can change your appetite or make you want to move less or retain water but it cant make you gain weight by itself.

    If people understand the difference then they can manage their weight better.


    Yes you are trying and not listening to anyone else. My cancer med absolutely slows my metabolism thus weight gain. I work harder to combat that, and I don't need a misinformed know it all to tell me differently. =)

    Why would I listen to someone tell me that a pill increased their weight? They took a pill and increased their mass beyond the amount of energy it contained. They created mass from nothing. That is not possible.

    Slows your metabolism is accurate. Causes weight gain would not be. It is accurate to say this pill slows my metabolism. It is not accurate to say this pill causes weight gain. So if it slowed your metabolism, or your energy expenditure, then you would have to adjust your energy intake or you would gain weight. Its simple.

    MrM27 wrote: »
    _Ben wrote: »
    Pharmacist here. OP Im not seeing in this thread specifically what you are taking (possibly missed it) but if you want to send me a PM, there may be an alternative medication that might work a bit better for you.

    Also for those who say medications can or cant cause weight loss, you're simply wrong. Medications can alter your metabolism, water retention, salt/electrolyte retention, etc. If anyone would like, Id be more than happy to explain in further detail

    So if they alter your metabolism and lower your TDEE would the fat gain be from the meds directly or is it from a reduction in TDEE and eating above that?

    Also, yes, please explain in further detail with supporting evidence.

    If I hit you over the head with a hammer, just hypothetically of course, since I'm not a violent person, would the pain be from being hit in the head with a hammer, or from the inflammation caused by the burst blood vessels and fibers under the skin?

    Sometimes people talk in shorthand. It's easier to say, "This medication caused weight gain," than "This medication caused my metabolism to slow which resulted in unknowingly overeating which resulted in weight gain."

    If you want to fix the problem then that is a very important distinction.

    If I take a drug and then gain weight I could say that the drug caused weight gain. I have to take that drug so there is nothing I can do about the weight gain. That is wrong.

    If someone tells me the drug can not cause weight gain but it does alter my appetite or cause me to be less active. If I eat more calories than I burn as a result THAT is what causes the weight gain. Then I know how to fix the problem. Adjust calories intake or increase calorie output. It simple even if its not easy.

    The drug did not cause the weight gain, too many calories cause the weight gain.


    It's simple, really?

    Riddle me this…

    I gained 111 lbs within 3 years on AD's all while following a strict diet given by a registered dietician, counting calories, AND being a competitive gymnast who trained 5 times a week 3 hours each practice. If you know anything about gymnastics, we are pushed to our limit every time we train. It's a brutal sport. There's a reason it's one of the top most dangerous sports.

    I wasn't eating more calories. I was eating less calories than I did before starting AD's. I wasn't inactive. I was more active than I was before starting AD's.

    So no, your whole "altering appetite, being less active, and not adjusting calorie intake" didn't apply to me.

    Do NOT try to tell me the medications didn't cause my weight gain when I was 95-97 freaking pounds my ENTIRE life before beginning AD's (oh and did I mention I couldn't gain a single pound no matter how much I tried until I began AD's… That's not a coincidence)

    What you are saying is impossible to the known laws of physics on this planet.

    You can not eat less calories than you burn and gain weight other than water retention.

    Weight is the gravitational force on your mass. If you want to change your weight you have to change your mass.

    In physics there is something called the Mass Energy Equivalence. Energy=Mass and they change in relation to each other. They equation for this E=mc2. A guy named Einstein wrote that. Maybe you have heard of him.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass–energy_equivalence

    To increase the mass of a system, in this case your body, you have to have a surplus of energy. To decrease it you have to have a deficit of energy. Most people use the calorie as the unit of measurement to calculate intake and expenditure. Or we simplify it as CICO. CI<CO=weight loss. CI>CO=weight gain. Simple.

    So now you can see that if you burned more than you ate you can not have added mass and increased your weight.


    You're right. I'm wrong. My medical team are liars. I'm just making it all up because I wanted to gain 100+ pounds. *eyeroll*

    Its not me trying to be right. I was trying to explain why we are saying that medications and medical issues can change energy expenditures but can not cause the actual weight gain. That comes from eating to much.

    The medication can change your appetite or make you want to move less or retain water but it cant make you gain weight by itself.

    If people understand the difference then they can manage their weight better.


    Yes you are trying and not listening to anyone else. My cancer med absolutely slows my metabolism thus weight gain. I work harder to combat that, and I don't need a misinformed know it all to tell me differently. =)

    Why would I listen to someone tell me that a pill increased their weight? They took a pill and increased their mass beyond the amount of energy it contained. They created mass from nothing. That is not possible.

    Slows your metabolism is accurate. Causes weight gain would not be. It is accurate to say this pill slows my metabolism. It is not accurate to say this pill causes weight gain. So if it slowed your metabolism, or your energy expenditure, then you would have to adjust your energy intake or you would gain weight. Its simple.



    I said that.

    Try_Reading_jpeg.JPG


    Yes you said that. My responses above were not directed to you. Not sure why you felt the need to respond to me and tell me I was not listening and call me a misinformed know it all. When I just said what you said.
  • FredDoyle
    FredDoyle Posts: 2,273 Member
    edited January 2015
    FredDoyle wrote: »
    _Ben wrote: »

    Pharmacy students are now experts?

    If you are tracking your calories in and out you can make adjustments to what the medications might slightly alter and still be successful at losing weight. As the OP has tried to claim she did not gain weight because of medications while eating 1 apple every 2 or 3 days.

    I lost the majority of my weight while on high doses of steroids and 13 other prescriptions. It took paying close attention to my numbers and making adjustments.

    Obviously its not impossible to lose weight while on 'weight gaining' medications, on the contrary, its very possible! However, the simple point is, some medications do make you gain weight. You may not see as fast of weight loss while on these medications, as compared to when you are not
    But see, I don't think they do. It may be semantics but I think that statement causes confusion, especially on a calorie counting site. They decrease your TDEE and that's not the same thing.
    If you are on a medication that has a known side effect of affecting your weight, measure and reduce your intake accordingly because eating too much with a lowered TDEE will make you gain weight.

    Unless you are a scientist actively researching the effect antidepressants have on weight, you are in no position to say "they just decrease your TDEE."

    Well, they either decrease your TDEE through metabolic pathways, make you less energetic, or they make you eat above your TDEE through increased appetite.
    What else is there? (excluding water weight gain)
    In the first case, be aware of the effects and monitor and reduce (if required) your intake.
    In the second case you will have to manage your appetite so that you don't over eat.
  • azulvioleta6
    azulvioleta6 Posts: 4,169 Member
    Well BramageOMG, this fat lady shows up at the gym nearly every day, and has been doing so for several years. I also eat really well, all of the time. Even when I weighed 300 pounds, I was not eating eating fast food or junk food--I have two different thyroid diseases, PCOS, metabolic syndrome/pre-diabetes, and several years ago, my pituitary gland stopped working after I had brain surgery. Still, I can out-dance, swim and walk just about anybody, and do so on a regular basis. I frequently work out with people half my age and size and put them to shame. I go to dance conferences and keep up with professional dancers. I will probably always be a little bit overweight though, no matter what I do.

    Sometimes people have REAL challenges. Those aren't the same as excuses.

    If you don't understand what you are talking about, maybe it would be better not to comment, no?
  • FatFreeFrolicking
    FatFreeFrolicking Posts: 4,252 Member
    edited January 2015
    BramageOMG wrote: »
    Maybe you can wish away your fat. Its too bad excuses don't burn calories. There would be more successful people here. Reminds me of the 3 fat ladies that showed up at the Gym on 1/3. By 1/5 it was down to 2 (fattest one quit coming) and now all 3 are gone. "I tried the gym, it didn't work".... Good luck

    @BramageOMG‌ Excuse me?

    I suggest you edit your post and say something more respectful because in case you forgot, you were once "fat" yourself. You were once the "fat guy" at the gym. So who are you to judge?

    Excuses and actual medical conditions that bring a host of challenges are two different things. I also suggest you learn the difference between an excuse and a medical condition that makes weight loss and exercise extremely difficult.

    I have Crohn's disease, insulin resistance, chronic hypoglycemia, PCOS, a screwed up thyroid, supraventricular tachycardia, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, and other conditions I won't get into because unless you have them yourself, you will never understand.

    In case you are unaware, all of the conditions I have greatly affect weight loss and exercise. I don't use them as an excuse. I use them as an excuse to work hard (harder than most have to). Due to my medical conditions, each time I exercise, I risk passing out, going into a coma, stroking out, or having a heart attack. I don't let that stop me because I have a goal and I'm going to do whatever it takes to get there even if it means risking my life or being uncomfortable.

    So the next time you judge the "fat girl" at the gym, you might want to actually know the person and their story first. If you did, I don't think you'd be so quick to judge.
  • fevrale
    fevrale Posts: 170 Member
    MrM27 wrote: »
    _Ben wrote: »
    Pharmacist here. OP Im not seeing in this thread specifically what you are taking (possibly missed it) but if you want to send me a PM, there may be an alternative medication that might work a bit better for you.

    Also for those who say medications can or cant cause weight loss, you're simply wrong. Medications can alter your metabolism, water retention, salt/electrolyte retention, etc. If anyone would like, Id be more than happy to explain in further detail

    So if they alter your metabolism and lower your TDEE would the fat gain be from the meds directly or is it from a reduction in TDEE and eating above that?

    Also, yes, please explain in further detail with supporting evidence.

    If I hit you over the head with a hammer, just hypothetically of course, since I'm not a violent person, would the pain be from being hit in the head with a hammer, or from the inflammation caused by the burst blood vessels and fibers under the skin?

    Sometimes people talk in shorthand. It's easier to say, "This medication caused weight gain," than "This medication caused my metabolism to slow which resulted in unknowingly overeating which resulted in weight gain."

    If you want to fix the problem then that is a very important distinction.

    If I take a drug and then gain weight I could say that the drug caused weight gain. I have to take that drug so there is nothing I can do about the weight gain. That is wrong.

    If someone tells me the drug can not cause weight gain but it does alter my appetite or cause me to be less active. If I eat more calories than I burn as a result THAT is what causes the weight gain. Then I know how to fix the problem. Adjust calories intake or increase calorie output. It simple even if its not easy.

    The drug did not cause the weight gain, too many calories cause the weight gain.


    It's simple, really?

    Riddle me this…

    I gained 111 lbs within 3 years on AD's all while following a strict diet given by a registered dietician, counting calories, AND being a competitive gymnast who trained 5 times a week 3 hours each practice. If you know anything about gymnastics, we are pushed to our limit every time we train. It's a brutal sport. There's a reason it's one of the top most dangerous sports.

    I wasn't eating more calories. I was eating less calories than I did before starting AD's. I wasn't inactive. I was more active than I was before starting AD's.

    So no, your whole "altering appetite, being less active, and not adjusting calorie intake" didn't apply to me.

    Do NOT try to tell me the medications didn't cause my weight gain when I was 95-97 freaking pounds my ENTIRE life before beginning AD's (oh and did I mention I couldn't gain a single pound no matter how much I tried until I began AD's… That's not a coincidence)

    What you are saying is impossible to the known laws of physics on this planet.

    You can not eat less calories than you burn and gain weight other than water retention.

    Weight is the gravitational force on your mass. If you want to change your weight you have to change your mass.

    In physics there is something called the Mass Energy Equivalence. Energy=Mass and they change in relation to each other. They equation for this E=mc2. A guy named Einstein wrote that. Maybe you have heard of him.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass–energy_equivalence

    To increase the mass of a system, in this case your body, you have to have a surplus of energy. To decrease it you have to have a deficit of energy. Most people use the calorie as the unit of measurement to calculate intake and expenditure. Or we simplify it as CICO. CI<CO=weight loss. CI>CO=weight gain. Simple.

    So now you can see that if you burned more than you ate you can not have added mass and increased your weight.


    You're right. I'm wrong. My medical team are liars. I'm just making it all up because I wanted to gain 100+ pounds. *eyeroll*

    Its not me trying to be right. I was trying to explain why we are saying that medications and medical issues can change energy expenditures but can not cause the actual weight gain. That comes from eating to much.

    The medication can change your appetite or make you want to move less or retain water but it cant make you gain weight by itself.

    If people understand the difference then they can manage their weight better.


    Yes you are trying and not listening to anyone else. My cancer med absolutely slows my metabolism thus weight gain. I work harder to combat that, and I don't need a misinformed know it all to tell me differently. =)

    Why would I listen to someone tell me that a pill increased their weight? They took a pill and increased their mass beyond the amount of energy it contained. They created mass from nothing. That is not possible.

    Slows your metabolism is accurate. Causes weight gain would not be. It is accurate to say this pill slows my metabolism. It is not accurate to say this pill causes weight gain. So if it slowed your metabolism, or your energy expenditure, then you would have to adjust your energy intake or you would gain weight. Its simple.



    What's your point? Getting people to say the medication didn't "make them gain weight" but instead "altered their metabolism" or whatever? Do you just want to be right? Are you a pedant when it comes to this? If so, it's unnecessary. Missing the proverbial forest for the trees.

    You might want to take it up with the field of medicine because their literature is replete with references to weight gain when it comes to certain medications even referring to the weight gain as "drug induced."

    If you just want to be right, yes...the pills don't have calories. The weight gain comes from something else brought about in association with the drug.

    But the solution isn't always as simple as you say. That's where the medical professionals come in, not someone on an online message board.
  • mustgetmuscles1
    mustgetmuscles1 Posts: 3,348 Member
    fevrale wrote: »
    MrM27 wrote: »
    _Ben wrote: »
    Pharmacist here. OP Im not seeing in this thread specifically what you are taking (possibly missed it) but if you want to send me a PM, there may be an alternative medication that might work a bit better for you.

    Also for those who say medications can or cant cause weight loss, you're simply wrong. Medications can alter your metabolism, water retention, salt/electrolyte retention, etc. If anyone would like, Id be more than happy to explain in further detail

    So if they alter your metabolism and lower your TDEE would the fat gain be from the meds directly or is it from a reduction in TDEE and eating above that?

    Also, yes, please explain in further detail with supporting evidence.

    If I hit you over the head with a hammer, just hypothetically of course, since I'm not a violent person, would the pain be from being hit in the head with a hammer, or from the inflammation caused by the burst blood vessels and fibers under the skin?

    Sometimes people talk in shorthand. It's easier to say, "This medication caused weight gain," than "This medication caused my metabolism to slow which resulted in unknowingly overeating which resulted in weight gain."

    If you want to fix the problem then that is a very important distinction.

    If I take a drug and then gain weight I could say that the drug caused weight gain. I have to take that drug so there is nothing I can do about the weight gain. That is wrong.

    If someone tells me the drug can not cause weight gain but it does alter my appetite or cause me to be less active. If I eat more calories than I burn as a result THAT is what causes the weight gain. Then I know how to fix the problem. Adjust calories intake or increase calorie output. It simple even if its not easy.

    The drug did not cause the weight gain, too many calories cause the weight gain.


    It's simple, really?

    Riddle me this…

    I gained 111 lbs within 3 years on AD's all while following a strict diet given by a registered dietician, counting calories, AND being a competitive gymnast who trained 5 times a week 3 hours each practice. If you know anything about gymnastics, we are pushed to our limit every time we train. It's a brutal sport. There's a reason it's one of the top most dangerous sports.

    I wasn't eating more calories. I was eating less calories than I did before starting AD's. I wasn't inactive. I was more active than I was before starting AD's.

    So no, your whole "altering appetite, being less active, and not adjusting calorie intake" didn't apply to me.

    Do NOT try to tell me the medications didn't cause my weight gain when I was 95-97 freaking pounds my ENTIRE life before beginning AD's (oh and did I mention I couldn't gain a single pound no matter how much I tried until I began AD's… That's not a coincidence)

    What you are saying is impossible to the known laws of physics on this planet.

    You can not eat less calories than you burn and gain weight other than water retention.

    Weight is the gravitational force on your mass. If you want to change your weight you have to change your mass.

    In physics there is something called the Mass Energy Equivalence. Energy=Mass and they change in relation to each other. They equation for this E=mc2. A guy named Einstein wrote that. Maybe you have heard of him.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass–energy_equivalence

    To increase the mass of a system, in this case your body, you have to have a surplus of energy. To decrease it you have to have a deficit of energy. Most people use the calorie as the unit of measurement to calculate intake and expenditure. Or we simplify it as CICO. CI<CO=weight loss. CI>CO=weight gain. Simple.

    So now you can see that if you burned more than you ate you can not have added mass and increased your weight.


    You're right. I'm wrong. My medical team are liars. I'm just making it all up because I wanted to gain 100+ pounds. *eyeroll*

    Its not me trying to be right. I was trying to explain why we are saying that medications and medical issues can change energy expenditures but can not cause the actual weight gain. That comes from eating to much.

    The medication can change your appetite or make you want to move less or retain water but it cant make you gain weight by itself.

    If people understand the difference then they can manage their weight better.


    Yes you are trying and not listening to anyone else. My cancer med absolutely slows my metabolism thus weight gain. I work harder to combat that, and I don't need a misinformed know it all to tell me differently. =)

    Why would I listen to someone tell me that a pill increased their weight? They took a pill and increased their mass beyond the amount of energy it contained. They created mass from nothing. That is not possible.

    Slows your metabolism is accurate. Causes weight gain would not be. It is accurate to say this pill slows my metabolism. It is not accurate to say this pill causes weight gain. So if it slowed your metabolism, or your energy expenditure, then you would have to adjust your energy intake or you would gain weight. Its simple.



    What's your point? Getting people to say the medication didn't "make them gain weight" but instead "altered their metabolism" or whatever? Do you just want to be right? Are you a pedant when it comes to this? If so, it's unnecessary. Missing the proverbial forest for the trees.

    You might want to take it up with the field of medicine because their literature is replete with references to weight gain when it comes to certain medications even referring to the weight gain as "drug induced."

    If you just want to be right, yes...the pills don't have calories. The weight gain comes from something else brought about in association with the drug.

    But the solution isn't always as simple as you say. That's where the medical professionals come in, not someone on an online message board.

    I guess I dont understand your problem with what I am saying. This is my very first comment in this section.
    "If you want to fix the problem then that is a very important distinction.

    If I take a drug and then gain weight I could say that the drug caused weight gain. I have to take that drug so there is nothing I can do about the weight gain. That is wrong.

    If someone tells me the drug can not cause weight gain but it does alter my appetite or cause me to be less active. If I eat more calories than I burn as a result THAT is what causes the weight gain. Then I know how to fix the problem. Adjust calories intake or increase calorie output. It simple even if its not easy.

    The drug did not cause the weight gain, too many calories cause the weight gain."

    What if I just wanted to help people meet their goals? How is that just wanting to be right? There are other posters saying the same exact thing as me. Do they just want to be right also? Even if you dig into the medical references you are talking about they give the reason for the weight gain. It is because of a change in appetite or reduction in energy output. That is important to know how to manage the problem.

    If a person thinks they are in a deficit and they still cant lose weight then they are not in a deficit. There is no drug or medical disorder that changes the laws of physics. Telling them that is a good thing.
  • fevrale
    fevrale Posts: 170 Member
    That
    fevrale wrote: »
    MrM27 wrote: »
    _Ben wrote: »
    Pharmacist here. OP Im not seeing in this thread specifically what you are taking (possibly missed it) but if you want to send me a PM, there may be an alternative medication that might work a bit better for you.

    Also for those who say medications can or cant cause weight loss, you're simply wrong. Medications can alter your metabolism, water retention, salt/electrolyte retention, etc. If anyone would like, Id be more than happy to explain in further detail

    So if they alter your metabolism and lower your TDEE would the fat gain be from the meds directly or is it from a reduction in TDEE and eating above that?

    Also, yes, please explain in further detail with supporting evidence.

    If I hit you over the head with a hammer, just hypothetically of course, since I'm not a violent person, would the pain be from being hit in the head with a hammer, or from the inflammation caused by the burst blood vessels and fibers under the skin?

    Sometimes people talk in shorthand. It's easier to say, "This medication caused weight gain," than "This medication caused my metabolism to slow which resulted in unknowingly overeating which resulted in weight gain."

    If you want to fix the problem then that is a very important distinction.

    If I take a drug and then gain weight I could say that the drug caused weight gain. I have to take that drug so there is nothing I can do about the weight gain. That is wrong.

    If someone tells me the drug can not cause weight gain but it does alter my appetite or cause me to be less active. If I eat more calories than I burn as a result THAT is what causes the weight gain. Then I know how to fix the problem. Adjust calories intake or increase calorie output. It simple even if its not easy.

    The drug did not cause the weight gain, too many calories cause the weight gain.


    It's simple, really?

    Riddle me this…

    I gained 111 lbs within 3 years on AD's all while following a strict diet given by a registered dietician, counting calories, AND being a competitive gymnast who trained 5 times a week 3 hours each practice. If you know anything about gymnastics, we are pushed to our limit every time we train. It's a brutal sport. There's a reason it's one of the top most dangerous sports.

    I wasn't eating more calories. I was eating less calories than I did before starting AD's. I wasn't inactive. I was more active than I was before starting AD's.

    So no, your whole "altering appetite, being less active, and not adjusting calorie intake" didn't apply to me.

    Do NOT try to tell me the medications didn't cause my weight gain when I was 95-97 freaking pounds my ENTIRE life before beginning AD's (oh and did I mention I couldn't gain a single pound no matter how much I tried until I began AD's… That's not a coincidence)

    What you are saying is impossible to the known laws of physics on this planet.

    You can not eat less calories than you burn and gain weight other than water retention.

    Weight is the gravitational force on your mass. If you want to change your weight you have to change your mass.

    In physics there is something called the Mass Energy Equivalence. Energy=Mass and they change in relation to each other. They equation for this E=mc2. A guy named Einstein wrote that. Maybe you have heard of him.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass–energy_equivalence

    To increase the mass of a system, in this case your body, you have to have a surplus of energy. To decrease it you have to have a deficit of energy. Most people use the calorie as the unit of measurement to calculate intake and expenditure. Or we simplify it as CICO. CI<CO=weight loss. CI>CO=weight gain. Simple.

    So now you can see that if you burned more than you ate you can not have added mass and increased your weight.


    You're right. I'm wrong. My medical team are liars. I'm just making it all up because I wanted to gain 100+ pounds. *eyeroll*

    Its not me trying to be right. I was trying to explain why we are saying that medications and medical issues can change energy expenditures but can not cause the actual weight gain. That comes from eating to much.

    The medication can change your appetite or make you want to move less or retain water but it cant make you gain weight by itself.

    If people understand the difference then they can manage their weight better.


    Yes you are trying and not listening to anyone else. My cancer med absolutely slows my metabolism thus weight gain. I work harder to combat that, and I don't need a misinformed know it all to tell me differently. =)

    Why would I listen to someone tell me that a pill increased their weight? They took a pill and increased their mass beyond the amount of energy it contained. They created mass from nothing. That is not possible.

    Slows your metabolism is accurate. Causes weight gain would not be. It is accurate to say this pill slows my metabolism. It is not accurate to say this pill causes weight gain. So if it slowed your metabolism, or your energy expenditure, then you would have to adjust your energy intake or you would gain weight. Its simple.



    What's your point? Getting people to say the medication didn't "make them gain weight" but instead "altered their metabolism" or whatever? Do you just want to be right? Are you a pedant when it comes to this? If so, it's unnecessary. Missing the proverbial forest for the trees.

    You might want to take it up with the field of medicine because their literature is replete with references to weight gain when it comes to certain medications even referring to the weight gain as "drug induced."

    If you just want to be right, yes...the pills don't have calories. The weight gain comes from something else brought about in association with the drug.

    But the solution isn't always as simple as you say. That's where the medical professionals come in, not someone on an online message board.

    I guess I dont understand your problem with what I am saying. This is my very first comment in this section.
    "If you want to fix the problem then that is a very important distinction.

    If I take a drug and then gain weight I could say that the drug caused weight gain. I have to take that drug so there is nothing I can do about the weight gain. That is wrong.

    If someone tells me the drug can not cause weight gain but it does alter my appetite or cause me to be less active. If I eat more calories than I burn as a result THAT is what causes the weight gain. Then I know how to fix the problem. Adjust calories intake or increase calorie output. It simple even if its not easy.

    The drug did not cause the weight gain, too many calories cause the weight gain."

    What if I just wanted to help people meet their goals? How is that just wanting to be right? There are other posters saying the same exact thing as me. Do they just want to be right also? Even if you dig into the medical references you are talking about they give the reason for the weight gain. It is because of a change in appetite or reduction in energy output. That is important to know how to manage the problem.

    If a person thinks they are in a deficit and they still cant lose weight then they are not in a deficit. There is no drug or medical disorder that changes the laws of physics. Telling them that is a good thing.

    That's why I asked what your point was.
  • I am on Seroquel and Sodium Valproate and am also gaining weight. I have changed my diet and exercise but am still gaining weight.
  • FredDoyle
    FredDoyle Posts: 2,273 Member
    bill188 wrote: »
    I am on Seroquel and Sodium Valproate and am also gaining weight. I have changed my diet and exercise but am still gaining weight.
    Weigh your food so that you know how many calories you are actually consuming, and if you continue to gain, eat less.
  • Hily93
    Hily93 Posts: 65 Member
    bretttania wrote: »
    Just joined today and was gonna ask same thing, I'm on 30mg antidepressants and no matter how much I diet I put Weight on, had a suspicion it was my meds causing it.

    Hi, many anti depressants cause weight gain, it what got me here in the first place :smile:
  • Hily93
    Hily93 Posts: 65 Member
    fevrale wrote: »
    Hily93 wrote: »
    YES! Most anti-psychotic and anti-depressant will and can cause weight gain. I shot up 60# with Seroquel. Abilfy is another one known for weight gain.
    I've even had a petite little doctor tell me that in no way shape or form did a drug cause me to put on weight. To be honest, she's lucky I didn't sit on her or break her in half since I weighed prolly three times as much as her at the time. I'm careful and will not take meds that have weight gain side effects simply b/c most of my depression was over being overweight.

    Anyone who says they don't has never been thru it and needs to STFU!

    Well aren't you pleasant...

    The meds didn't make you gain the 60 lbs. Not adjusting calories to account for the slight changes the medication caused is what put the weight on.

    When I was first put on the steroids I wasn't watching calories, weight was going up about 8-10 lbs per month because I didn't adjust for lack of movement, and increased appetite. Once I did I lost steadily.

    Some of us were never told that weight gain was a side effect. I for one blamed myself for over 2 years.

    Exactly, and I'm still unsure where you got the medical degree???

    The brochures list weight gain as a side effect, it's common knowledge, more know than 10 years ago. The doctors even discuss it with patients now. And you are right, I'm a bucket of sunshine when someone is telling a flat out lie!

    It's not a flat out lie. Does it make it more difficult yes it can, can you take steps to work towards finding the correct intake to either maintain/lose weight while on medications .. yes you can but you have to decide you want to take an active part in your health and not just place blame on doctors.

    I don't need a medical degree, I know from experience that it is possible once you stop blaming everything else and start taking an active role in your health.

    I'm thinking the reason people who are affected by certain medications that are associated with weight gain wanted to post in this thread initially was to find people in similar situations for support and figuring out solutions to their problems. Not to have strangers tell them that they're putting on the blame on someone else (I know, I know, "it's a public forum/free country and I can do what I want"). If I missed the post in which someone said "WAHH! It's all the doctors fault!" please, point it out to me. If not, the fact that someone is posting on this site is that they are looking to take an active part in their health.

    Now, I'd love a thread for those on these sorts of medications where we can talk about stuff that matters like how to restrict intake and deal with the insatiable hunger, etc. and the stuff that's actually productive. Let's do that sometime.

    I've tried to point that out several times, but some on this post doesn't seem to get that. They keep attacking the ones that post here
  • Hily93
    Hily93 Posts: 65 Member
    fatcity66 wrote: »
    Hily93 wrote: »
    fevrale wrote: »
    I was on a medication that made me insatiably hungry. I gained 60 pounds in about 6 months. I'm trying to lose that weight now. I'm still on a similar medication but one without the side effect of constant hunger.

    This. I was on Prednisone for 2 years and hated it. I was always hungry. It definitely contributed towards my weight gain. Luckily, I got off of it and the insatiable appetite ended.

    I was put on meds that would increase my appetite, my doc said that it would be the worst side effect, but that I needed that since I hardly eat. But all I got was weight gain and no appetite. After I changed doc I found out the drug makes you gain weight and should never be given to a overweight person. I was already a bit overweight(size M) since the only thing I would eat a day would be sugary stuff, and due to misdiagnosed asthma I was forbidden to exercise. In the last 2 years I have gone from size S/M to size L/XL. :neutral_face:


    I have asthma and I have never heard a dr say to forbid exercise.mine always told me to walk and get some kind of exercise to build up my lung strength. same with others I know who have asthma and heart problems as well they are always told to build up their lung capacity with exercise.I would have gotten a second opinion to be honest.

    I thought that was strange also. I've had asthma since age 4, and I have always been active in sports. As long as it is treated appropriately, and well controlled, there is no problem with exercising with asthma. In fact, it can be helpful in improving the symptoms over time.

    I said misdiagnosed, they told me I had a heart disorder.
  • elphie754
    elphie754 Posts: 7,574 Member
    randomtai wrote: »
    rabbitjb wrote: »
    MrM27 wrote: »
    RodaRose wrote: »
    Meds can cause weight gain in ways that researchers have only recently begun to study.
    How do you know the cause fat gain, not water retention, if they haven't even begun to study it and said it does?

    How do meds negate physics?

    Magic

    its-magic-shia-labeouf-gif.gif

    I never can resist giggling at this gif. I even reference it at work lol.
  • elphie754
    elphie754 Posts: 7,574 Member
    fevrale wrote: »
    The people telling you it's simple science, calories in-calories out, it's an excuse blah blah blah have obviously never felt the side effect of changed *kitten* brain chemistry affecting everything about them. I think it's rooted in a deeply held stigma not only of mental illness but also of FAT. So, weight gain associated with antidepressants and the like is a double stigma. They'll tell you to stop making excuses and whatever (lots of "tough love" advocates on this board...sans the love part)...

    Guess what, the side effects listed on all of these medications we're discussing don't just list "increased appetite" as side effects, they include "weight gain." The medical literature refers to it as "antidepressant-induced weight gain." Induced meaning "bring about" or "bring rise" to. It's not "antidepressant-related weight gain if you're weak, lazy, or out of control." Check out the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry if you're so inclined. Upwards of 25% experience significant weight gain as a side effect. So, no, it's not a given but it's a likelihood.

    So, yeah, it's up to us to offset the effects of these medications and their side effects to the best of our ability. But it's inappropriate to tell people how and why they're wrong about their medications and medical conditions, unless you're their *kitten* physician. I mean, the medication I gained weight on has a side effect of giving men female breasts. They should really work to offset that themselves and stop using their medication as an excuse for growing male boobs.

    Talk to your doctors if you're concerned about medication and these WELL-KNOWN side effects. You may have to live with it to stay on the meds but there could be other advice they have for you in how to address the issues.

    Oh really?

    I have tried my best not to respond to this thread, but have to respond to this.

    I was put on medication that is very well known for "weight gain." It was for mental illness. Antidepressants and mood stabilizers. I was put on them 4 years ago. The first few months I was on them, I lost 30 lbs. my dr was very concerned. Here I was being prescribed meds known to cause significant weight gain, and I was losing. She thought I was being untruthful about my bulimia habits.

    What happened? Not having manic episodes, I had stopped self medicating. Cutting the alcohol out dropped my cals and thus led to weight loss. I never experienced weight gain with any if the meds.

    I was seeing a nutritionist because of the history of an eating disorder. She flat out told me that the meds themselves do lot cause weight gain. It is the change in appetite that causes you to eat more and thus gain weight.

    Honestly- yes, I think some people use this as an excuse. Same as when they try to claim they are addicted to food. They want it to be something else than their fault. It is easier to blame other things. That is just human nature.

    On and maybe the general public still has a stigma about mental health, but it is decreasing in stigma in the health field. Now more than ever, they have realized that they need to treat the mental health of a patient as seriously as the physical health. I work in healthcare. I see dozens of PTs a week, many on some form of psychiatric medication (area I work in has a lot of poverty and this the issues that come with it).


    I am sorry, but take some responsibility for yourself. Yes, your medication may make you feel more hungry, but you decide if you are going to eat XY and z, not the medication. Increased appetite is a side effect, gaining weight is what happens if you give into that side effect.
  • elphie754
    elphie754 Posts: 7,574 Member
    YES! Most anti-psychotic and anti-depressant will and can cause weight gain. I shot up 60# with Seroquel. Abilfy is another one known for weight gain.
    I've even had a petite little doctor tell me that in no way shape or form did a drug cause me to put on weight. To be honest, she's lucky I didn't sit on her or break her in half since I weighed prolly three times as much as her at the time. I'm careful and will not take meds that have weight gain side effects simply b/c most of my depression was over being overweight.

    Anyone who says they don't has never been thru it and needs to STFU!


    I say they don't automatically cause weight gain and I have been through a plethora of psych meds.
    They cause in erased appetite which leads to weight gain if you eat too many cals. Medication can not manufacture weight out of no where.