dairy and fruit sugars?

I've noticed that I am always well over my sugar target for the day- myfitnesspal counts dairy and fruit sugars as part of this, should I be cutting down on these products? I'm freaking out a little that I will start gaining weight eating this much sugar everyday... some other forums on the internet only say that you should count "added sugar", what's your views on this?
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Replies

  • Azexas
    Azexas Posts: 4,334 Member
    MFP sugar goals are set very low. I wouldn't worry about being over your sugar goals unless you have a medical condition which requires you to monitor it. You will not gain weight being over your sugar goal as long as you are in a caloric deficit.
  • azulvioleta6
    azulvioleta6 Posts: 4,169 Member
    edited July 2015
    You will not find agreement about the topic on this forum.

    I am on the "sugar is sugar" side of the fence. Your body doesn't distinguish the difference between added and natural sugars. Just because Americans are used to eating (and don't want to reduce their intake of) massive amounts of sugar...well, that doesn't make it healthy.

    Assuming that you have a normal metabolism, too much sugar is probably less of an issue for weight loss than it is for long-term health and good aging.

    An easy switch is to exchange some of your fruits for more vegetables. Eating less processed food also makes it easier to reduce your sugar intake
  • DisneyDude85
    DisneyDude85 Posts: 427 Member
    edited July 2015
    I removed the sugar goal and replaced it with fiber :) The fiber you GET from fruit is important :) most of the sugar I get is from fruit. Not a big sweets guy.
  • Azexas
    Azexas Posts: 4,334 Member
    edited July 2015
    You will not find agreement about the topic on this forum.

    I am on the "sugar is sugar" side of the fence. Your body doesn't distinguish the difference between added and natural sugars. Just because Americans are used to eating (and don't want to reduce their intake of) massive amounts of sugar...well, that doesn't make it healthy.

    A good rule of thumb is to not make blanket statements about a population. Do you know every American?
  • mantium999
    mantium999 Posts: 1,499 Member
    You will not find agreement about the topic on this forum.

    I am on the "sugar is sugar" side of the fence. Your body doesn't distinguish the difference between added and natural sugars. Just because Americans are used to eating (and don't want to reduce their intake of) massive amounts of sugar...well, that doesn't make it healthy.

    "massive" is subjective, anything in excess is unhealthy, too much is defined by the individual and their overall diet with respect to all macros/micros
  • Azexas
    Azexas Posts: 4,334 Member
    I removed the sugar goal and replaced it with fiber :) The fiber you GET from fruit is important :) most of the sugar I get is from fruit. Not a big sweets guy.

    Agreed. I swapped my sugar goal for fiber and track that as well. Makes it easier in the long run.
  • PrizePopple
    PrizePopple Posts: 3,193 Member
    I removed the sugar goal and replaced it with fiber :) The fiber you GET from fruit is important :) most of the sugar I get is from fruit. Not a big sweets guy.

    And fiber is something that people struggle to get enough of. I have to maintain a high fiber diet per my GI and colorectal surgeon, and sometimes it's NOT easy. I'm not even at the daily minimum MFP sets, much less the level I should be at. I guess I'll be having Cheerios.. heh.
  • azulvioleta6
    azulvioleta6 Posts: 4,169 Member
    You will not find agreement about the topic on this forum.

    I am on the "sugar is sugar" side of the fence. Your body doesn't distinguish the difference between added and natural sugars. Just because Americans are used to eating (and don't want to reduce their intake of) massive amounts of sugar...well, that doesn't make it healthy.

    Phew, good thing not all of us are Americans then.

    Are you not a North American?

    People who eat the Standard American Diet (S.A.D.) tend to be those who most vehemently object to following basic sugar limits. If you are not living off of processed junk, it's pretty easy to avoid going over the sugar limit.
  • Azexas
    Azexas Posts: 4,334 Member
    edited July 2015
    You will not find agreement about the topic on this forum.

    I am on the "sugar is sugar" side of the fence. Your body doesn't distinguish the difference between added and natural sugars. Just because Americans are used to eating (and don't want to reduce their intake of) massive amounts of sugar...well, that doesn't make it healthy.

    Phew, good thing not all of us are Americans then.

    Are you not a North American?

    People who eat the Standard American Diet (S.A.D.) tend to be those who most vehemently object to following basic sugar limits. If you are not living off of processed junk, it's pretty easy to avoid going over the sugar limit.


    MY banana, grapes and strawberries put me over the sugar limit...
  • Lasmartchika
    Lasmartchika Posts: 3,440 Member
    You will not find agreement about the topic on this forum.

    I am on the "sugar is sugar" side of the fence. Your body doesn't distinguish the difference between added and natural sugars. Just because Americans are used to eating (and don't want to reduce their intake of) massive amounts of sugar...well, that doesn't make it healthy.

    Assuming that you have a normal metabolism, too much sugar is probably less of an issue for weight loss than it is for long-term health and good aging.

    An easy switch is to exchange some of your fruits for more vegetables. Eating less processed food also makes it easier to reduce your sugar intake

    @azulvioleta6 Which Amercans? North? Central? South? You can't know all of them. :grey_question::grey_question::grey_question: Who are you referring to? Quite a huge blanket statement there. Me ofendes.
    I've noticed that I am always well over my sugar target for the day- myfitnesspal counts dairy and fruit sugars as part of this, should I be cutting down on these products? I'm freaking out a little that I will start gaining weight eating this much sugar everyday... some other forums on the internet only say that you should count "added sugar", what's your views on this?

    OP don't worry about the sugars... as others have stated, you can track something else... after all, for weight loss, what mattters is a calorie deficit. :smile:
  • PeachyCarol
    PeachyCarol Posts: 8,029 Member
    edited July 2015
    You will not find agreement about the topic on this forum.

    I am on the "sugar is sugar" side of the fence. Your body doesn't distinguish the difference between added and natural sugars. Just because Americans are used to eating (and don't want to reduce their intake of) massive amounts of sugar...well, that doesn't make it healthy.

    Assuming that you have a normal metabolism, too much sugar is probably less of an issue for weight loss than it is for long-term health and good aging.

    An easy switch is to exchange some of your fruits for more vegetables. Eating less processed food also makes it easier to reduce your sugar intake

    You're conflating "some" sugar with "too much" sugar.

    Why?

    And taking a stab at Americans to boot. Lovely.

  • lisabinco
    lisabinco Posts: 1,016 Member
    I removed the sugar goal and replaced it with fiber :) The fiber you GET from fruit is important :) most of the sugar I get is from fruit. Not a big sweets guy.

    Same for me. I don't worry about how much sugar is in whole fruit nor do I limit whole fruit. (Sugars from dairy? Easy fix. I don't do dairy anymore at all -- way too lactose intolerant.)
  • PeachyCarol
    PeachyCarol Posts: 8,029 Member
    I've noticed that I am always well over my sugar target for the day- myfitnesspal counts dairy and fruit sugars as part of this, should I be cutting down on these products? I'm freaking out a little that I will start gaining weight eating this much sugar everyday... some other forums on the internet only say that you should count "added sugar", what's your views on this?

    OP, while MFP's sugar goals are set low, it's up to you to determine what a prudent intake for you is.

    Fruit sugar and dairy sugar are fine. Added sugar is what we're recommended to watch and limit. If you're going over, I do have to ask by how much? If it's only a little -- don't sweat it.

    Follow the WHO's guidelines on added sugars if you're concerned:

    http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2015/sugar-guideline/en/
  • Cynthiamr2015
    Cynthiamr2015 Posts: 151 Member
    Troutsy wrote: »
    I removed the sugar goal and replaced it with fiber :) The fiber you GET from fruit is important :) most of the sugar I get is from fruit. Not a big sweets guy.

    Agreed. I swapped my sugar goal for fiber and track that as well. Makes it easier in the long run.

    How do you do that? remove the sugar?
  • tlblood
    tlblood Posts: 473 Member
    I don't pay much attention to the sugars in natural sources, but pay attention to added sugars. I switched to a lower sugar flavored yogurt when the sugar in my old yogurt (Chobani, Fage) contained almost 1/2 of my recommended daily sugar. I don't care if I go over my sugar and most of it is from fruit, but it helps me notice when I go over because of the high added sugar in some of my foods.
  • Azexas
    Azexas Posts: 4,334 Member
    edited July 2015
    Troutsy wrote: »
    I removed the sugar goal and replaced it with fiber :) The fiber you GET from fruit is important :) most of the sugar I get is from fruit. Not a big sweets guy.

    Agreed. I swapped my sugar goal for fiber and track that as well. Makes it easier in the long run.

    How do you do that? remove the sugar?

    On the website: go to the food section- and select settings- and then pick and choose your macros.
  • PrizePopple
    PrizePopple Posts: 3,193 Member
    You will not find agreement about the topic on this forum.

    I am on the "sugar is sugar" side of the fence. Your body doesn't distinguish the difference between added and natural sugars. Just because Americans are used to eating (and don't want to reduce their intake of) massive amounts of sugar...well, that doesn't make it healthy.

    Phew, good thing not all of us are Americans then.

    Are you not a North American?

    People who eat the Standard American Diet (S.A.D.) tend to be those who most vehemently object to following basic sugar limits. If you are not living off of processed junk, it's pretty easy to avoid going over the sugar limit.

    Oh noes 62% of my sugar intake today is from my morning snack... of watermelon. Only 22g left for my day, and I think I'll have some Oreo's just for you lady.
  • Liftng4Lis
    Liftng4Lis Posts: 15,151 Member
    You will not find agreement about the topic on this forum.

    I am on the "sugar is sugar" side of the fence. Your body doesn't distinguish the difference between added and natural sugars. Just because Americans are used to eating (and don't want to reduce their intake of) massive amounts of sugar...well, that doesn't make it healthy.

    Assuming that you have a normal metabolism, too much sugar is probably less of an issue for weight loss than it is for long-term health and good aging.

    An easy switch is to exchange some of your fruits for more vegetables. Eating less processed food also makes it easier to reduce your sugar intake

    Excuse me but what exactly do you have against Americans?

    OP, I disregard sugar, as I have no medical condition that would require me to track it. Instead, I changed that particular spot to track my fiber.