Calorie Counter

You are currently viewing the message boards in:

more protien better...or not?

12346»

Replies

  • psuLemonpsuLemon Posts: 34,988Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator Posts: 34,988Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator
    senecarr wrote: »
    senecarr wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Well, protein keeps me a lot more full than carbs, so I figure that's a much better use of my calories. It also keeps your insulin levels stable because it digests more slowly (read: good for the metabolism), and it helps to build muscle, so I'd say it's a good thing! I definitely wouldn't worry about getting too bulky. Lol.

    Protein actually spikes insulin (no big deal though because this is normal and healthy and doesn't hurt your metabolism).

    does any food raising your insulin levels?

    Many fats don't (but some do). The hype around insulin spikes is just that, hype. Unless someone is diabetic, there's no reason to be concerned about the fact that a food raises insulin levels. In healthy individuals, that's what supposed to happen.
    I think it's worth noting though that very high BG spikes is what can (over time) drag some healthy individuals into a diabetic state. So while for most people it may be fine, some people do need to be mindful of this.

    Insulin spikes keep people from having high blood glucose spikes.
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Well, protein keeps me a lot more full than carbs, so I figure that's a much better use of my calories. It also keeps your insulin levels stable because it digests more slowly (read: good for the metabolism), and it helps to build muscle, so I'd say it's a good thing! I definitely wouldn't worry about getting too bulky. Lol.

    Protein actually spikes insulin (no big deal though because this is normal and healthy and doesn't hurt your metabolism).

    does any food raising your insulin levels?

    Many fats don't (but some do). The hype around insulin spikes is just that, hype. Unless someone is diabetic, there's no reason to be concerned about the fact that a food raises insulin levels. In healthy individuals, that's what supposed to happen.
    I think it's worth noting though that very high BG spikes is what can (over time) drag some healthy individuals into a diabetic state. So while for most people it may be fine, some people do need to be mindful of this.

    Actually, according to the mayo clinic, there is no known cause, although genetics, excess weight and inactivity are the main risk factors.
    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/symptoms-causes/dxc-20169861
    Understood. But considering a large portion of the population (more than 100,000,000 Americans) have a disruptive insulin and glucose metabolism, I think more people should be concerned about insulin spikes.

    1 out 3 Americans? Depending on how it is defined, that's pretty good when 2 out of 3 Americans are overweight or obese.

    Also, take into consideration a large portion of that 1 out of 3 is undiagnosed and the US keeps lowering it's standard (comparatively to other countries), its hard to tell what the actual number is.

    Either way, it doesn't support the original claim.
    edited March 2016
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    @ForecasterJason a diabetic state as in dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)? As a type 2 I never spiked or dipped on protein. In fact, I never dipped at all until I got closer to normal weight. Protein usually metablolises too slowly to affect me one way or another. Whey protein, as I've learned from the body builders here, is an exception.
    Right, I did not think protein was usually much of a factor. If my understanding is correct, I thought all along that it's the insulin spike in response to carbs/high blood sugar that is more so the issue.

    Insulin is supposed to spike in response to glucose and protein. The issue is more when it starts plateau - gets high and stays high because glucose is free circulating instead of being taken into cells.
  • hectorh82hectorh82 Posts: 110Member Member Posts: 110Member Member
    stealthq wrote: »
    hectorh82 wrote: »
    ok ok ok.. one thing you must always remember with protein is!!!!! consume your daily minimum.. thats it!!!
    now if you wish to increase muscle growth im talking bulk then increase protein gradually.. if you want lean muscle stick with your minimum and do it the natural way by hard work and various exercises.. marketing has people freaking about carbs and protein.. your body needs both!!!! your daily minimum is enough for day to day, if you are super active increase those levels slightly.. not 2 or 3 shakes a day!! one jacks your stomach up second its a waist of money lol... everyone here has great advice, just take examples from everyone and test them out..

    If protein shakes are 'jacking up your stomach', try a different protein. Better yet, if you've got the calories to spare get the protein through regular food.

    That's not a good reason to eat the daily minimum (I assume you mean the RDA).

    Wasn't there a study that indicated that eating more than the RDA of protein correlated to preserving muscle mass as you age? Or am I pulling that out of the ether?

    i didnt mean it towards myself, but i have been around plenty of both women and men that take more then they can handle and its a waste "literally" haha. i was just putting it out there.. people are just so stuck on protein these days that you do not need much of it to meet goals.. simple goals i should say.. yes you need protein like everyone knows that.. and everyone needs to know their own daily (depends on many things) based on their goals.. thats also why i said gradually increase!! lol.. regular food is best for protein (my opinion) unless you are on a medical diet then supplements work. when you are starting out you need to meet your/ mecidcal average intake in all fields and work with that before increasing .. now this and all comments on here are subject to debate but slow and easy always wins in the long run.. listen to your body, like i also said earlier try different tips/examples from the different members... and find your sweet spot lol.
  • Carlos_421Carlos_421 Posts: 4,883Member, Premium Member Posts: 4,883Member, Premium Member
    hectorh82 wrote: »
    stealthq wrote: »
    hectorh82 wrote: »
    ok ok ok.. one thing you must always remember with protein is!!!!! consume your daily minimum.. thats it!!!
    now if you wish to increase muscle growth im talking bulk then increase protein gradually.. if you want lean muscle stick with your minimum and do it the natural way by hard work and various exercises.. marketing has people freaking about carbs and protein.. your body needs both!!!! your daily minimum is enough for day to day, if you are super active increase those levels slightly.. not 2 or 3 shakes a day!! one jacks your stomach up second its a waist of money lol... everyone here has great advice, just take examples from everyone and test them out..

    If protein shakes are 'jacking up your stomach', try a different protein. Better yet, if you've got the calories to spare get the protein through regular food.

    That's not a good reason to eat the daily minimum (I assume you mean the RDA).

    Wasn't there a study that indicated that eating more than the RDA of protein correlated to preserving muscle mass as you age? Or am I pulling that out of the ether?

    i didnt mean it towards myself, but i have been around plenty of both women and men that take more then they can handle and its a waste "literally" haha. i was just putting it out there.. people are just so stuck on protein these days that you do not need much of it to meet goals.. simple goals i should say.. yes you need protein like everyone knows that.. and everyone needs to know their own daily (depends on many things) based on their goals.. thats also why i said gradually increase!! lol.. regular food is best for protein (my opinion) unless you are on a medical diet then supplements work. when you are starting out you need to meet your/ mecidcal average intake in all fields and work with that before increasing .. now this and all comments on here are subject to debate but slow and easy always wins in the long run.. listen to your body, like i also said earlier try different tips/examples from the different members... and find your sweet spot lol.

    Still no.
    There is no reason to say it's better to start with the rdi and gradually increase. There's no reason to say that the rdi is better for lean muscle gains. There's no reason to say you "don't need much of it to meet goals."
  • jgnatcajgnatca Posts: 14,495Member Member Posts: 14,495Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    jgnatca wrote: »
    @ForecasterJason a diabetic state as in dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)? As a type 2 I never spiked or dipped on protein. In fact, I never dipped at all until I got closer to normal weight. Protein usually metablolises too slowly to affect me one way or another. Whey protein, as I've learned from the body builders here, is an exception.
    Right, I did not think protein was usually much of a factor. If my understanding is correct, I thought all along that it's the insulin spike in response to carbs/high blood sugar that is more so the issue.

    Insulin is supposed to spike in response to glucose and protein. The issue is more when it starts plateau - gets high and stays high because glucose is free circulating instead of being taken into cells.

    This is one of the better explanations I've heard. Thank you.
  • hockeysniper8hockeysniper8 Posts: 252Member Member Posts: 252Member Member
    For maintaining weight, I am at .5 Gram of protein / per pound. It takes me about 3-4 months to go thru 5 lb of protein
  • WetcoasterWetcoaster Posts: 1,790Member Member Posts: 1,790Member Member
    This was on his Facebook page today........



    Brad Schoenfeld
    2 hrs · Ossining, NY, United States ·

    I'm in the process of writing up an article on the maximal amount of protein that can be used for muscle-building in a single meal and hence implications for frequency of feedings. A good amount of interesting research on the topic, but it's important to consider that protein metabolism is influenced by a variety of factors (protein source, protein dosage, whether other nutrients are simultaneously consumed, etc). Not as black-and-white a topic as it may seem on the surface - findings need a good deal of extrapolation to draw evidence-based conclusions.
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Posts: 34,988Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator Posts: 34,988Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator
    Wetcoaster wrote: »
    This was on his Facebook page today........



    Brad Schoenfeld
    2 hrs · Ossining, NY, United States ·

    I'm in the process of writing up an article on the maximal amount of protein that can be used for muscle-building in a single meal and hence implications for frequency of feedings. A good amount of interesting research on the topic, but it's important to consider that protein metabolism is influenced by a variety of factors (protein source, protein dosage, whether other nutrients are simultaneously consumed, etc). Not as black-and-white a topic as it may seem on the surface - findings need a good deal of extrapolation to draw evidence-based conclusions.

    Oh that is excited
  • AnvilHeadAnvilHead Posts: 18,543Member Member Posts: 18,543Member Member
    AnvilHead wrote: »

    Excerpt:
    High protein diets have been found to preserve lean body mass when dieting in both obese people[11] and athletes [12] and has also been shown to improve overall body composition[13]. A doubling of protein intake from 0.9g/kg (near the daily recommended intake for the general population) to 1.8g/kg is able to preserve lean muscle mass during short-term and relatively drastic drops in calories.[14]
  • PackerjohnPackerjohn Posts: 4,859Member Member Posts: 4,859Member Member
    _John_ wrote: »
    The only problems with increasing protein % for haphazard dieters is that it then requires more nutritious foods from your remaining calories as fats and especially carbs.

    So you have to drop a Bladder Buster size Coke, a Biggie order of fries or a couple doughnuts for something healthier. Where's the problem?
  • PackerjohnPackerjohn Posts: 4,859Member Member Posts: 4,859Member Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    gympho wrote: »
    I try to eat/drink 1gram of protein per pound I weigh. But being around 250Lbs, that's pretty hard. Therefore I normally drink 1 or 2 protein shakes a day. And I have for about the past 15 years.

    Ya know...the whole grams per pound thing is supposed to be for pounds of lean body mass...
    You could be getting by with a lot less.

    And this is why you will see some sources recommend .8 gm per pound. Just doing a rough estimate assuming 20% BF.
  • PackerjohnPackerjohn Posts: 4,859Member Member Posts: 4,859Member Member
    Orphia wrote: »
    Didn't want to start a new thread, but a person I have quite high regard for has been saying the average Western diet contains more than enough protein, and doesn't need extra concern and supplementation when in a deficit.

    Thoughts?

    I thought I'd mention it because there seems to be great concern these days and at MFP about getting enough protein in a deficit, but 20 years ago, before this trend started, millions of dieting people weren't fading away with muscle wastage.

    Bit puzzled.

    Does this person have registered dietitian or PhD in Nutrition behind their name?
  • PackerjohnPackerjohn Posts: 4,859Member Member Posts: 4,859Member Member
    The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends 10-35% of calories from protein. As a 6'2" 205 lb male I aim for about 200 gm of protein a day. I maintain at around 2800 calories a day (maybe a bit more) so at a gram per pound of bodyweight I'm right around 30% of calories from protein.

    Hard to say how anyone would call that excessive.
Sign In or Register to comment.