I can't run

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Replies

  • QueenKristine77
    QueenKristine77 Posts: 67 Member
    i started running a few years ago and at first i was just running from light pole to light pole on my street. Taking walking breaks in between. Oh and i also used to be a smoker which made it even more difficult. I quit almost four years ago and now i can run for a couple of hours non-stop...if i have the time.
  • mrsloganlife
    mrsloganlife Posts: 158 Member
    I was not a runner either--seriously. If someone was coming at me with a gun, I would speed walk away.

    I did C25k--this kind of structure program could be great for you! It will slowly introduce you to running. Like another poster stated, there are times where you will have to repeat a week. My husband and I started Week 5 and ended up doing Week 4 over again because he was struggling to breath.

    Also--keep your mind clear and positive. I noticed during my runs if I wasn't happy with my pace, or I was in a poor mood...as soon as I let any negativity into my mind my chest got tight and all of the sudden I struggled to breathe. Then I panicked, and it just got worse from there.

    You can do it--honestly this morning someone jogged past me and if I wasn't in work clothes and wearing heels I would have started jogging behind them.
  • Just_Ceci
    Just_Ceci Posts: 5,926 Member
    If you can walk for 30 minutes without problems, you should try a couch to 5k program. Also follow the advice of slowing down. You are probably trying to run too fast.
  • scubakat67
    scubakat67 Posts: 485 Member
    I started "wogging" a couple years ago. I was in fair shape, but needed to add cardio to my strength training, and needed an oompfh to get the scale moving. When I started, I could only "run" for about 50 yards ... and we're talking a SLOW run for about 50 yards and my chest would feel like it was going to explode. But I kept at it - alternating between walking and jogging, basically using the FARTLEKS method without even knowing that's what I was doing. I would watch my heart rate monitor and back off when my HR got too high - this was really what dictated most of my intervals.

    Even at my best consistency (6 days/week minimum distance of 3 miles), I still couldn't run the entire time/distance. And this was after I'd been at it for about 6 months. BUT, my time/mile was where I saw my improvement. I started and was lucky to do a 16 min mile (people can walk faster!). I got that down to a low 12 min mile. Still not fast, but that was OK with me ... I could also see the differences in my cardiovascular health when I could hike up a hill without getting winded (not to mention dropping some inches off my hips/legs/waist).

    I fell off the wagon for about a year, but have picked back up and am back to my wogging ... slow and steady will still get you to the finish line!

    Definitely slow down. And most definitely, get outside if you can. Wear a heart rate monitor and know your max HR.
  • mommazach
    mommazach Posts: 384 Member
    C25K is a wonderful app.... It does help a ton. However... You need to learn to breathe also. Begin with exhaling 4 seconds through your mouth then inhaling 3 seconds through nose. Running has a ton to do with breathing. Also, as a large breasted woman typing here.. Get the girls some good support! I have a tough time with breathing unless my sports bra is working effectively. Best of luck to you. When I started MFP it was to run with my daughter in a 5 Mile last August. I jog with my dogs several times a week now.
  • brittanynw11
    brittanynw11 Posts: 7 Member
    I am also in my 20s and weigh about 205 lbs right now. A few months ago, I couldn't run more than 20 seconds. I've been going on the elliptical for about 30 minutes 3-4 times a week for the last few months and decided to try out a jog outside on my way back to my apartment. To my surprise, I could run without my chest wanting to explode for at least a couple minutes! I'm not going to say it's easy or that I'm fast by any means, but I think that since we are similar age/weight - as we continue to exercise and get in better shape it might become easier to run for longer amounts of time!! Good luck and keep up the good work :)
  • mulecanter
    mulecanter Posts: 1,731 Member
    Lots of good advice above. Walking is great. Pick a distance like 3 miles and walk it. Time it (use your smart phone app like Runkeeper to track everything). Insert as much running in three miles as you can stand. Repeat every other day. As your weight goes down you will naturally add to your running portion until you are 100%. I was running 7 miles, I gained back 20lbs, now I'm down to 4 miles. Try carrying a twenty pound dumbbell with you as you run--you can see why its slowing you down. Add podcasts and/or music to your walking to make the time pass.
  • myfightforfitness
    myfightforfitness Posts: 136 Member
    lynette4 wrote: »
    It may take you more than 3 months to build up. Running takes time and patience. But I did have one thought, how are your arms/shoulders/chest muscles and even your hands when you run? If you are tense, making fists or hunched over it makes it difficult for your lungs to expand. When you are running try to focus on your upper body.. it needs to feel loose and your hands need to be relaxed. When I run I will shake my arms out every so often when I am feeling like its harder to breath than usual and that usually does the trick for me

    Wow that's insane I run exactly the same way you're advising me not to! My hands are always forming a fist and I'm leaning forward (because I worry I might fall off the treadmill lol) thanks a lot. will definitely be fixing my posture!
  • myfightforfitness
    myfightforfitness Posts: 136 Member
    I think you're probably running too fast. When I started, my "run" was barely faster than my fast walk. Keep at it. I admire your tenacity! :)
    Like others have mentioned, you are probably going too fast. And if you aren't doing it regularly enough you won't improve.

    Stick to a structured program (the one above is fine, or Couch to 5k). Do it 3x a week with a non-running day in between. When you run you need to actually think "jog". You need to be able to pass the talk test. If you can't say a few sentences without gasping for breath you are going to fast. SLOW DOWN. Do not worry about speed at this point, speed will come later. I shuffle more than I do walk/jog, but I can shuffle for longer distances than I ever thought possible before.
    I weigh over 300 lbs and I can run for 30 minutes right now - Im just going 3 mph. Even though that is a walking speed, I pick my legs up and move as a runner. I sweat like CRAZY and really feel like I am running. I would just find a speed you are comfortable with.
    i started running a few years ago and at first i was just running from light pole to light pole on my street. Taking walking breaks in between. Oh and i also used to be a smoker which made it even more difficult. I quit almost four years ago and now i can run for a couple of hours non-stop...if i have the time.
    I was not a runner either--seriously. If someone was coming at me with a gun, I would speed walk away.

    I did C25k--this kind of structure program could be great for you! It will slowly introduce you to running. Like another poster stated, there are times where you will have to repeat a week. My husband and I started Week 5 and ended up doing Week 4 over again because he was struggling to breath.

    Also--keep your mind clear and positive. I noticed during my runs if I wasn't happy with my pace, or I was in a poor mood...as soon as I let any negativity into my mind my chest got tight and all of the sudden I struggled to breathe. Then I panicked, and it just got worse from there.

    You can do it--honestly this morning someone jogged past me and if I wasn't in work clothes and wearing heels I would have started jogging behind them.
    Just_Ceci wrote: »
    If you can walk for 30 minutes without problems, you should try a couch to 5k program. Also follow the advice of slowing down. You are probably trying to run too fast.
    scubakat67 wrote: »
    I started "wogging" a couple years ago. I was in fair shape, but needed to add cardio to my strength training, and needed an oompfh to get the scale moving. When I started, I could only "run" for about 50 yards ... and we're talking a SLOW run for about 50 yards and my chest would feel like it was going to explode. But I kept at it - alternating between walking and jogging, basically using the FARTLEKS method without even knowing that's what I was doing. I would watch my heart rate monitor and back off when my HR got too high - this was really what dictated most of my intervals.

    Even at my best consistency (6 days/week minimum distance of 3 miles), I still couldn't run the entire time/distance. And this was after I'd been at it for about 6 months. BUT, my time/mile was where I saw my improvement. I started and was lucky to do a 16 min mile (people can walk faster!). I got that down to a low 12 min mile. Still not fast, but that was OK with me ... I could also see the differences in my cardiovascular health when I could hike up a hill without getting winded (not to mention dropping some inches off my hips/legs/waist).

    I fell off the wagon for about a year, but have picked back up and am back to my wogging ... slow and steady will still get you to the finish line!

    Definitely slow down. And most definitely, get outside if you can. Wear a heart rate monitor and know your max HR.
    mommazach wrote: »
    C25K is a wonderful app.... It does help a ton. However... You need to learn to breathe also. Begin with exhaling 4 seconds through your mouth then inhaling 3 seconds through nose. Running has a ton to do with breathing. Also, as a large breasted woman typing here.. Get the girls some good support! I have a tough time with breathing unless my sports bra is working effectively. Best of luck to you. When I started MFP it was to run with my daughter in a 5 Mile last August. I jog with my dogs several times a week now.
    I am also in my 20s and weigh about 205 lbs right now. A few months ago, I couldn't run more than 20 seconds. I've been going on the elliptical for about 30 minutes 3-4 times a week for the last few months and decided to try out a jog outside on my way back to my apartment. To my surprise, I could run without my chest wanting to explode for at least a couple minutes! I'm not going to say it's easy or that I'm fast by any means, but I think that since we are similar age/weight - as we continue to exercise and get in better shape it might become easier to run for longer amounts of time!! Good luck and keep up the good work :)
    mulecanter wrote: »
    Lots of good advice above. Walking is great. Pick a distance like 3 miles and walk it. Time it (use your smart phone app like Runkeeper to track everything). Insert as much running in three miles as you can stand. Repeat every other day. As your weight goes down you will naturally add to your running portion until you are 100%. I was running 7 miles, I gained back 20lbs, now I'm down to 4 miles. Try carrying a twenty pound dumbbell with you as you run--you can see why its slowing you down. Add podcasts and/or music to your walking to make the time pass.

    Thank you all so much for taking time out of your day to respond to this post with great advice tips and encouragement THANKS :):)
  • MommyL2015
    MommyL2015 Posts: 1,411 Member
    gobonas99 wrote: »
    two things.

    First - get off the dreadmill and go outside.

    I <3 my treadmill. It's hot and humid where I live, no hills, no trails, and lots of mosquitoes and loose dogs. :( I have air conditioning and netflix inside on my treadmill. lol
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,687 Member
    RA60172 wrote: »
    Losing weight by calorie restriction does nothing to improve cardiovascular function.

    No, but less weight = less stress on your body. I tried starting an exercise program at 220# and it was painful. I waited and have now restarted it at 197#. MUCH easier!

    I've done some form of exercise no matter how much I weighed. Sure, it's easier now, but at my top weight I could still walk, swim, garden, lift weights, and practice yoga. Just didn't do enough of it and was eating too much Ben & Jerry's.

    I've had no interested in running since I left the military and no one could make me run anymore.
  • darkangel45422
    darkangel45422 Posts: 234 Member
    I'm surprised no one's mentioned this, but have you looked into the possibility that you're asthmatic? Just judging from your description (chest pain + inability to breathe) and you stating that even after several weeks it's not improving at all, it could be something you might want to get a dr to check in to. I personally have exercised induced asthma, which basically means I can't jog or run almost at all without being unable to breathe, even when I was an athlete. Now that I'm overweight and exercising less, sometimes a faster walk kills my breathing.
    Just a thought, in case your breathing doesn't improve at all just with some training/weight loss.