Calorie Counter

Message Boards Debate: Health and Fitness
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Essential Oils

135678

Replies

  • WeepingAngel81WeepingAngel81 Member Posts: 2,246 Member Member Posts: 2,246 Member
    I have mint for hair growth (though I don't use enough to see results even if it DID work, which I don't know if it does or not), tea tree oil for skin issues (discoloration, breaking out, bumps, cuts, etc) which works 100% of the time, and a lavender-infused bath oil because it helps my husband sleep better (diagnosed insomnia).

    But honestly I'm a total skeptic. I'd try more if someone I knew and trusted had opinions on them.

    Hey! Nice pic!

    Yeah, I use a shampoo that has tea tree oil in it. I like the tingly sensation, but I don't know if it does anything more than give that nice cooling feeling.
  • WeepingAngel81WeepingAngel81 Member Posts: 2,246 Member Member Posts: 2,246 Member
    Jason did you really think peppermint oil soaked all the way though your skin into your guts? Or did I read that wrong?
    I don't know all of the science behind it, but its ability to make me shaky/nauseous (when using too much) suggests to me that the oil went far enough below the skin surface.

    You have mentioned that you were already having some issues before using the oil, hence the reason for trying it. Could that shaky/nauseous feeling have been a result of that issue and not the oil?
  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Member Posts: 8,703 Member Member Posts: 8,703 Member
    Yeah, I have never been told that putting peppermint oil on my stomach will help with my Crohn's (though people who have no clue about this disease have given me lots of wacky "cure" speeches). Rubbing oil on my stomach isn't going to make the pain go away. Peppermint tea helps minimally but that actually gets in your digestive system
  • auddiiauddii Member Posts: 15,410 Member Member Posts: 15,410 Member
    I have mint for hair growth (though I don't use enough to see results even if it DID work, which I don't know if it does or not), tea tree oil for skin issues (discoloration, breaking out, bumps, cuts, etc) which works 100% of the time, and a lavender-infused bath oil because it helps my husband sleep better (diagnosed insomnia).

    But honestly I'm a total skeptic. I'd try more if someone I knew and trusted had opinions on them.

    I love mint in my shampoo just because it makes my scalp feel tingly and then I'm happy. I haven't actually noticed any difference just due to the mint itself.

    I use argan oil on my face and hair, but no special properties and essence in that; it moisturizes and keeps my hair less frizzy because it's oil doing oil type stuff.
  • auddiiauddii Member Posts: 15,410 Member Member Posts: 15,410 Member
    I have mint for hair growth (though I don't use enough to see results even if it DID work, which I don't know if it does or not), tea tree oil for skin issues (discoloration, breaking out, bumps, cuts, etc) which works 100% of the time, and a lavender-infused bath oil because it helps my husband sleep better (diagnosed insomnia).

    But honestly I'm a total skeptic. I'd try more if someone I knew and trusted had opinions on them.

    Hey! Nice pic!

    Yeah, I use a shampoo that has tea tree oil in it. I like the tingly sensation, but I don't know if it does anything more than give that nice cooling feeling.

    Ha, I was about to ask what was up with all the flowers...
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Member Posts: 2,583 Member Member Posts: 2,583 Member
    Jason did you really think peppermint oil soaked all the way though your skin into your guts? Or did I read that wrong?
    I don't know all of the science behind it, but its ability to make me shaky/nauseous (when using too much) suggests to me that the oil went far enough below the skin surface.

    You have mentioned that you were already having some issues before using the oil, hence the reason for trying it. Could that shaky/nauseous feeling have been a result of that issue and not the oil?
    No. I was feeling perfectly fine right before I used it. My digestive issues weren't impacting me at that particular time.


  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Member Posts: 8,703 Member Member Posts: 8,703 Member
    auddii wrote: »
    Jason did you really think peppermint oil soaked all the way though your skin into your guts? Or did I read that wrong?
    I don't know all of the science behind it, but its ability to make me shaky/nauseous (when using too much) suggests to me that the oil went far enough below the skin surface.

    My guess is that it's the strong smell. Smells can often make people nauseous without requiring any substance entering their bodies at all.

    This. Totally this
    edited May 2016
  • WeepingAngel81WeepingAngel81 Member Posts: 2,246 Member Member Posts: 2,246 Member
    auddii wrote: »
    I have mint for hair growth (though I don't use enough to see results even if it DID work, which I don't know if it does or not), tea tree oil for skin issues (discoloration, breaking out, bumps, cuts, etc) which works 100% of the time, and a lavender-infused bath oil because it helps my husband sleep better (diagnosed insomnia).

    But honestly I'm a total skeptic. I'd try more if someone I knew and trusted had opinions on them.

    Hey! Nice pic!

    Yeah, I use a shampoo that has tea tree oil in it. I like the tingly sensation, but I don't know if it does anything more than give that nice cooling feeling.

    Ha, I was about to ask what was up with all the flowers...

    It's a goofy snap chat filter :) My sister called me a flower child and I sent that to her. She sent me one back with her looking like Satan!!! Being fair, she's pregnant for the first time and feeling like she's going to go crazy on anyone who looks at her the wrong way, so maybe that demon things fits a little haha
  • stealthqstealthq Member Posts: 4,307 Member Member Posts: 4,307 Member
    auddii wrote: »
    This is an image of a colon (see the arrow.)
    As you can see, it isn't really near the abdominal surface (skin, muscles, fat, fascia, etc...)
    Surface oils are not going to reach the colon, not unless you bath in them 24/7.

    mr475137.fig1a.jpg

    I'm following what you're saying here. However, in theory (I say this because I haven't found scientific studies on this, so if anyone knows of any, let me know) E.O.'s are absorbed into the blood stream when applied topically and your body "carries" it to where it needs to go. Just as if you were to take an advil it would help your back pain. Now, if that theory were proven, I could understand how rubbing it on the skin anywhere would help. Maybe that is what Forecaster is trying to get at?

    Anything applied topically has a difficult time getting into the blood stream. That's actually the purpose of skin; it acts as a barrier for all the things we are exposed to in daily life. Evolution works wonders on that.

    Absorbing deep into the skin means it goes "deep" into a thin layer; it does not enter the blood stream.

    And claims that essential oils or carrier oils can is just hype to sell their products.

    Add DMSO and that changes things. Interesting tidbit - some essential oil containing products contain a fair bit of DMSO. Personally, considering that some essential oils can be toxic depending on dose, I'd be reluctant to use such a product without there being some research done on the effects.
  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Member Posts: 8,703 Member Member Posts: 8,703 Member
    Why were you rubbing oil on your belly for digestive issues you didn't have at the time (even though it wouldn't help your digestive issues anyways)?
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Member Posts: 2,583 Member Member Posts: 2,583 Member
    auddii wrote: »
    Jason did you really think peppermint oil soaked all the way though your skin into your guts? Or did I read that wrong?
    I don't know all of the science behind it, but its ability to make me shaky/nauseous (when using too much) suggests to me that the oil went far enough below the skin surface.

    My guess is that it's the strong smell. Smells can often make people nauseous without requiring any substance entering their bodies at all.
    Not likely, since I had inhaled it probably about as much previous times before (it wasn't the first time I'd mixed up some peppermint oil with a carrier oil). Also, it wasn't until after I had applied the oil (about 3-4 minutes later) that I felt nauseous, and not at the time I was rubbing it on.

    edited May 2016
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Member Posts: 24,424 Member Member Posts: 24,424 Member
    This is an image of a colon (see the arrow.)
    As you can see, it isn't really near the abdominal surface (skin, muscles, fat, fascia, etc...)
    Surface oils are not going to reach the colon, not unless you bath in them 24/7.

    mr475137.fig1a.jpg

    I'm following what you're saying here. However, in theory (I say this because I haven't found scientific studies on this, so if anyone knows of any, let me know) E.O.'s are absorbed into the blood stream when applied topically and your body "carries" it to where it needs to go. Just as if you were to take an advil it would help your back pain. Now, if that theory were proven, I could understand how rubbing it on the skin anywhere would help. Maybe that is what Forecaster is trying to get at?

    Wouldn't it be fantastic if we just rubbed aspirin, insulin and antibiotics on our skin and they went where they were supposed to go?

    A few things can be delivered systemically via a topical cream but for the most part ... that's a no.

    If you have a study that demonstrates that topical peppermint oil is effective for treating IBS or other colonic symptoms, PM me, that's a blockbuster right there.
    edited May 2016
  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Member Posts: 8,703 Member Member Posts: 8,703 Member
    Me too @EvgeniZyntx I'm sure all the research scientists and doctors who treat my disease (Crohn's) would love to know they are doing it wrong
  • WeepingAngel81WeepingAngel81 Member Posts: 2,246 Member Member Posts: 2,246 Member
    This is an image of a colon (see the arrow.)
    As you can see, it isn't really near the abdominal surface (skin, muscles, fat, fascia, etc...)
    Surface oils are not going to reach the colon, not unless you bath in them 24/7.

    mr475137.fig1a.jpg

    I'm following what you're saying here. However, in theory (I say this because I haven't found scientific studies on this, so if anyone knows of any, let me know) E.O.'s are absorbed into the blood stream when applied topically and your body "carries" it to where it needs to go. Just as if you were to take an advil it would help your back pain. Now, if that theory were proven, I could understand how rubbing it on the skin anywhere would help. Maybe that is what Forecaster is trying to get at?

    Wouldn't it be fantastic if we just rubbed aspirin, insulin and antibiotics on our skin and they went where they were supposed to go?

    A few things can be delivered systemically via a topical cream but for the most part ... that's a no.

    If you have a study that demonstrates that topical peppermint oil is effective for treating IBS or other colonic symptoms, PM me, that's a blockbuster right there.

    That's what I am saying. Jason had mentioned that he rubbed it on his belly. From what I could see, the only things out there are theories stating this helps. There is nothing supported in evidence. That's why I said if anyone has anything showing there is evidence then let me know.
    edited May 2016
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Member Posts: 2,583 Member Member Posts: 2,583 Member
    I took this out of the book I have on essential oils. Not sure if the rest of you believe it, but I think it could easily explain what happened the particular instance when I rubbed an excessive amount of oil on my skin. Notice the first section at the top and what it says about putting more. xigwhzeipjyr.jpg

  • WeepingAngel81WeepingAngel81 Member Posts: 2,246 Member Member Posts: 2,246 Member
    I took this out of the book I have on essential oils. Not sure if the rest of you believe it, but I think it could easily explain what happened the particular instance when I rubbed an excessive amount of oil on my skin. Notice the first section at the top and what it says about putting more. xigwhzeipjyr.jpg

    I don't know how to put a pic on the comments because I am lame like that, but I just typed into google "essential oil usage guide" and there seems to be a lot of conflicting information on how much to use. One website said that topically you would use up to 36 drops a day. That is a lot! However, I would like to see more scientific evidence behind it.
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Member Posts: 24,424 Member Member Posts: 24,424 Member
    stealthq wrote: »
    auddii wrote: »
    This is an image of a colon (see the arrow.)
    As you can see, it isn't really near the abdominal surface (skin, muscles, fat, fascia, etc...)
    Surface oils are not going to reach the colon, not unless you bath in them 24/7.

    mr475137.fig1a.jpg

    I'm following what you're saying here. However, in theory (I say this because I haven't found scientific studies on this, so if anyone knows of any, let me know) E.O.'s are absorbed into the blood stream when applied topically and your body "carries" it to where it needs to go. Just as if you were to take an advil it would help your back pain. Now, if that theory were proven, I could understand how rubbing it on the skin anywhere would help. Maybe that is what Forecaster is trying to get at?

    Anything applied topically has a difficult time getting into the blood stream. That's actually the purpose of skin; it acts as a barrier for all the things we are exposed to in daily life. Evolution works wonders on that.

    Absorbing deep into the skin means it goes "deep" into a thin layer; it does not enter the blood stream.

    And claims that essential oils or carrier oils can is just hype to sell their products.

    Add DMSO and that changes things. Interesting tidbit - some essential oil containing products contain a fair bit of DMSO. Personally, considering that some essential oils can be toxic depending on dose, I'd be reluctant to use such a product without there being some research done on the effects.

    Playing with DMSO is probably not a good idea. Might get him a Darwin Award.
  • auddiiauddii Member Posts: 15,410 Member Member Posts: 15,410 Member
    I took this out of the book I have on essential oils. Not sure if the rest of you believe it, but I think it could easily explain what happened the particular instance when I rubbed an excessive amount of oil on my skin. Notice the first section at the top and what it says about putting more. xigwhzeipjyr.jpg

    Oh. That explains a lot.


    We'll just leave it at it's woo, but there is lots of "documentation" supporting essential oils; it's usually from sources selling said oils.


    And that book reminds me of the detoxifying pads you could buy off of late night TV that you put on your feet. They'd always show them "working" because they'd turn black from all the toxins they were absorbing. Then people started posting on the internet how the pads turn black even when just left in a sealed container; it was exposure to air.
Sign In or Register to comment.