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Interesting way that people excuse their overweight / obesity

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Replies

  • LivingtheLeanDream
    LivingtheLeanDream Posts: 13,345 Member
    Its easy to come up with excuses for why we are overweight....
  • shirayne
    shirayne Posts: 263 Member
    I am the queen of making excuses so when I read about this "Set Point", my brain went right to... Woohoo! Another reason I'm not losing weight! :) So I looked it up. http://www.mirror-mirror.org/set.htm The article doesn't talk about the body "preventing" weight loss because of a set point but more that the body may make it more difficult to lose the weight. That being said, I still believe that regardless of the time it takes, CICO is it. So my body can fight me all it wants, as long as I can continue eating healthy calories and burning more of them than I eat, I'll eventually lose weight. I've started this weight loss "journey" too many times to mention and each time I've gained some of it back. Why? As the queen of excuses, I could make up a bunch of reasons but it comes down to sugar, pizza, burgers, chips, freezies, too much coffee every day containing too much sugar and cream and sitting on my larger than life derriere. What's also interesting in the article is that it says there's no test to calculate your set point. You just have to pay attention to your body and what it's trying to tell you. Shouldn't we being doing that anyways???
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    paulgads82 wrote: »
    Now, my case isn't typical I guess but I'm not the only one with good reasons to have struggled with weight. Scientifically speaking it's simple, I ate too much and didn't move enough, but life is more nuanced, more complex than CICO. Achieving the right ratio of CICO is very hard for some people. I did make excuses and I have no problem admitting it, but they were pretty good excuses and I'm sure others have good excuses too.

    I don't even necessarily think of them as excuses, as I don't feel like I had a responsibility to someone else to make my weight a top priority. There are explanations for why I gained or why I took a few years to get a handle on it that are helpful for me to understand to both combat the causes and prevent them from happening again (or watch out for in some cases). Trying to understand those reasons isn't making an excuse. It's not like I complained to people when I was fat and then said "I can't."
  • paulgads82
    paulgads82 Posts: 256 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    paulgads82 wrote: »
    Now, my case isn't typical I guess but I'm not the only one with good reasons to have struggled with weight. Scientifically speaking it's simple, I ate too much and didn't move enough, but life is more nuanced, more complex than CICO. Achieving the right ratio of CICO is very hard for some people. I did make excuses and I have no problem admitting it, but they were pretty good excuses and I'm sure others have good excuses too.

    I don't even necessarily think of them as excuses, as I don't feel like I had a responsibility to someone else to make my weight a top priority. There are explanations for why I gained or why I took a few years to get a handle on it that are helpful for me to understand to both combat the causes and prevent them from happening again (or watch out for in some cases). Trying to understand those reasons isn't making an excuse. It's not like I complained to people when I was fat and then said "I can't."

    Perhaps explanation is better than excuse. I did feel like I could never lose weight for a while because food was such a psychological crutch for me.
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,933 Member
    edited June 2016
    DrEnalg wrote: »
    How can a "body" want something (like, a preferred weight range) without a person controlling it?

    You mean like to pee? Or the urge to breathe?

    It's a result of evolution.

    Weight gain is not an autonomic reflex.

    That's true. I answered the question of why people use figures of speech like "my body wants" versus "I want" by pointing to autonomic reflexes as a tangible example of why people might do this. :smile: