Welcome to Debate Club! Please be aware that this is a space for respectful debate, and that your ideas will be challenged here. Please remember to critique the argument, not the author.

Interesting way that people excuse their overweight / obesity

1235722

Replies

  • LaceyBirds
    LaceyBirds Posts: 451 Member
    tomteboda wrote: »
    Alternative hypothesis: You're older, and its normal for us to become a bit heavier as we age. Although I'm not sure how much older you are now than then. CT scanning has demonstrated that the pelvic girdle continues to widen as we age, and with that, weight does go up over time.

    This is interesting - thanks for sharing it. Here is a link to an article in Science Daily that references the study that determined this: https://sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110525110453.htm:

  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
    LaceyBirds wrote: »
    tomteboda wrote: »
    Alternative hypothesis: You're older, and its normal for us to become a bit heavier as we age. Although I'm not sure how much older you are now than then. CT scanning has demonstrated that the pelvic girdle continues to widen as we age, and with that, weight does go up over time.

    This is interesting - thanks for sharing it. Here is a link to an article in Science Daily that references the study that determined this: https://sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110525110453.htm:

    So the pelvis widens a bit as people age. This is not why people get fat, eating more calories than they burn is why.

    Works for young and old.
  • sarahthes
    sarahthes Posts: 3,397 Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    LaceyBirds wrote: »
    tomteboda wrote: »
    Alternative hypothesis: You're older, and its normal for us to become a bit heavier as we age. Although I'm not sure how much older you are now than then. CT scanning has demonstrated that the pelvic girdle continues to widen as we age, and with that, weight does go up over time.

    This is interesting - thanks for sharing it. Here is a link to an article in Science Daily that references the study that determined this: https://sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110525110453.htm:

    So the pelvis widens a bit as people age. This is not why people get fat, eating more calories than they burn is why.

    Works for young and old.

    Yes, but one's calorie requirement can decrease naturally as one ages, often without a corresponding decrease in hunger. Therefore one can eat the same as one always did and still gain weight. The reasons for the decrease in energy expenditure can vary greatly, which is why it can be hard to understand why one is suddenly gaining weight when they didn't before, especially if the reason is something 'unseen' like hormone levels.

    As far as macros affecting weight loss, I don't think there have been a ton of studies in this area, at least not in humans (more in rats/mice). I at least find the hypothesis that macro composition could impact weight loss to be plausible, through a hormone or gut bacteria mechanism that would change nutrient absorption. I'm not saying something as extreme as true nutrient malabsorption. Just different digestion efficiencies, basically.

    But like I said, while it's an intriguing hypothesis there's no comprehensive studies to back it up yet. Would like to see more research on that area to either prove or disprove it once and for all though!
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 25,296 Member
    DrEnalg wrote: »
    I'm kind of interested in the way people explain their behavior. One example is pertinent to weight loss / diet. I was having a debate with my girlfriend about this, who was arguing what basically sounded like the set-point theory to me. The argument went something like this:

    Me: "I think anyone can lose weight, it's just a matter of CICO."

    Her: "Except that people's bodies naturally have a certain preference for a certain weight. You can force your body down to a particular weight, but then your body will want to go back to the weight it was at."

    Anyone notice anything strange about this kind of use of language? As if "you" are separate from "your body." How can a "body" want something (like, a preferred weight range) without a person controlling it? Isn't this a strange use of language, like we're somehow divorced from our bodies?

    Anyways, just a philosophical point really.

    Yeah, philosophers have been chewing on the "mind-body problem", or mind-body dualism if you prefer, for centuries if not millennia. {Shrug.}

    Like some other who've commented, I think it's best understood as figurative or metaphorical, and that trying to parse such things rationally, in extensional terms, is just another common example of being confused by abstractions.
  • mommarnurse
    mommarnurse Posts: 515 Member
    lithezebra wrote: »
    I can't paraphrase it very well, but there was a thread in this forum about how long it takes for the body to stop trying to regain the weight you lose. It was a hormonal thing, if I remember correctly, and the time frame was a little less than a year. I found it very hopeful. If a person can hold out for a year, your body gets the hint.

    I don't think its hormonal but psychological. And behavioral repetition - aka creating habits.