No laughing please!!

Hi everyone.

I'm fairly new to exercise and yesterday I managed to jog 1.5 miles in 15 minutes.....no laughing please!!!

Anyway it got me thinking, as I'm solely trying to lose weight, should I be looking to jog faster or to jog further? or both?

Thanks
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Replies

  • maryjaquiss
    maryjaquiss Posts: 307 Member
    1.5 miles in 15 minutes is great!

    I'm not an expert runner by any means, but I would always try to increase distance OR speed, not both at the same time, especially if you're just starting out. Trying to do too much can cause your body to start falling apart (speaking from bitter experience!)
  • jennypapage
    jennypapage Posts: 489 Member
    if you increase your distance , eventually your speed will also increase. i don't know how much 1.5miles is , but try not to push yourself too hard since you're new to exercise. It's very easy to get an injury by being overzealous.
  • paulbrttn
    paulbrttn Posts: 72 Member
    A 10 minute mile is pretty good if you're just starting out, but I would suggest trying to run further at a slower pace.
    Look at the c25k app I started it 6 weeks ago and skipped a few runs and am now a week into training for a 10k. You're already at a better point than I was when I started it (I could only manage 5 minutes of constant running) but I am now entering a week where I'm doing 3 sets of 15 minutes with 1 minute rest between each one. I'd say you could probably start the app around week 3 or 4 if you can already do 15 minutes.
    You should be doing it at a pace where you can still hold a conversation without struggling.
  • snowflake930
    snowflake930 Posts: 2,193 Member
    Very good start!

    Fitness level % of Maximum heart rate (MHR)
    Beginner
    Low 50 – 60%
    Average 60 – 70%
    High 75 – 85%
    Sustained maximum heart rate for 30-60 minutes

    But remember, weight loss is mostly about eating less calories than you burn. Track calories for weight loss, consuming less than you are burning.
  • bandb678
    bandb678 Posts: 104 Member
    Your first day of running was awesome for a beginner but beware of doing too much too soon as you run the risk of injury. I have taught a few beginner running classes and the focus is not on speed but slowly increasing the distance. One should not increase by more than 10% a week.
  • olymp1a
    olymp1a Posts: 1,798 Member
    I don't see anything laughable. Plus it is a very good starting time! Good job! :smile:

    Keep going and build steadily without overdoing it to avoid injuries and make sure you do not focus on speed at the moment but on building your physique and mileage. You will improve in speed later on.
  • Joanna2012B
    Joanna2012B Posts: 1,466 Member
    Nothing to laugh at my friend!! I think you did awesome!! I would suggest to increase distance slowly. When you are happy with your distance than work on speed. The worst thing you can do is push yourself to go further and faster too soon. This will increase your risk of injury which will just hurt your progress. Listen to your body, if you are feeling pain in your feet, knees or shins please take it seriously. Also, include strengthening exercises to compliment your running and don't forget to stretch after your run!!!

  • Jazzbear742
    Jazzbear742 Posts: 10 Member
    I know nothing about running or jogging as that's just not my thing. I just want to applaud you for getting out there and getting started - no matter how far or how fast. Keep up the good work! B)
  • Joanna2012B
    Joanna2012B Posts: 1,466 Member
    jdawson002 wrote: »
    thanks for the encouragement everyone....at 220lbs jogging certainly isn't easy for me but I'm trying to vary my exercises as I previously just used the elliptical.

    Cross training is so very important. When you are ready try adding cycling and swimming!!!
  • zyxst
    zyxst Posts: 9,131 Member
    Weight loss is eating less.
    Exercise for health/because you like it.

    If you ran that whole mileage without stopping, there ain't nothing to laugh at. I can't run 100 feet without needing a break.
  • Trish1c
    Trish1c Posts: 546 Member
    I think that is excellent. Good for you.

    Nobody's laughing. The Olympics are over. You aren't being judged on time & this isn't a competition. You are out there exercising which is the only important thing!

    If you enjoy an exercise do it. Don't worry if it's not somebody's else favorite.
  • shagerty777
    shagerty777 Posts: 185 Member
    I've worked my way up to being able to run a 5k at around a 10 minute/mile pace in the last year so you are doing great. My one regret is not doing a programmed training routine like the Couch to 5K at this point. I feel I would have progressed much faster and would be a better runner if I had. Keep up the good work!
  • rosebarnalice
    rosebarnalice Posts: 3,493 Member
    jdawson002 wrote: »
    Hi everyone.

    Anyway it got me thinking, as I'm solely trying to lose weight, should I be looking to jog faster or to jog further? or both?

    Losing weight, increasing your activity level, increasing your endurance and speed-- those are ALL worthy health and fitness goals that have the lovely effect of supporting each other!

  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,870 Member
    jdawson002 wrote: »
    Anyway it got me thinking, as I'm solely trying to lose weight, should I be looking to jog faster or to jog further? or both?

    So the main thing about weight loss is having a calorie deficit. What running gives you is a method of managing your deficit. I was in a similar situation, nearly 200lbs, when I started to lose weight. Easy to say that it's all about the calorie deficit, so what I found was that I was more psychologically satisfied if I ran, then ate to my goal, than if I didn't. So eating to 1600 cals was difficult, but running for three miles and eating 2000 calories was ok.

    The main contributor to calorie expenditure in running is distance, rather than pace. So aim to run longer, rather than faster. One of the benefits of running longer is that you get faster.

    For what it's worth a 10 minute mile is respectable, that's about the pace I do much of my training at. The secret is being able to sustain it for longer. What I found quite quickly was that running became more important to me than weight loss. It helps me to clear my head, as well as help my fitness.

    Three and a half years ago I started using Couch to 5K, on Sunday I ran for 40 miles. The first 32 of those at a 10 minute mile.
  • kwtilbury
    kwtilbury Posts: 1,234 Member
    if you increase your distance , eventually your speed will also increase. i don't know how much 1.5miles is , but try not to push yourself too hard since you're new to exercise. It's very easy to get an injury by being overzealous.

    This. When I was training for a half marathon, I would add 0.5-1.0 miles per week. I'm sure there are more training programs out there.

    Keep up the good work!
  • bharris71
    bharris71 Posts: 11 Member
    I run an 11 1/2 minute mile so if yours is laughable, I'm scared to know what mine is, lol. Definitely agree with everyone hear, work on your distance and the speed will come, just don't over do it.
  • BrianSharpe
    BrianSharpe Posts: 9,160 Member
    edited August 2016

    The main contributor to calorie expenditure in running is distance, rather than pace. So aim to run longer, rather than faster. One of the benefits of running longer is that you get faster.

    While distance is the primary determinant of calorie expenditure ( handy formula: .63 x weight in lbs x distance in miles) you should be doing the vast majority of your runs at a conversational pace, if that means running slower than 10 minute miles then don't worry about slowing down ( my race pace for a 10K is about 8:30 per mile, my training pace for a mid-week 10km run is over 2 minutes per mile slower).

    Not only can running help you maintain a caloric deficit you'll improve your cardiovascular health, bone density etc. Personally I've also found that running has also had very positive effects on my sense of well being too.

    Increase your distances gradually and take recovery days between runs (you can x-train....ride your bike, go for a swim or a walk etc) and, most importantly, have fun.