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Elementary School Gym teachers telling kids to restrict calories!

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Replies

  • Whit_88
    Whit_88 Posts: 36 Member
    to kind of roll off ccsernica's post there...

    I think the things the teachers saying should be better relayed to the parents not the kids.
    Parents are the ones who set examples for their kids, if she wants to teach calories, invite the parents who want to learn to come and learn, let them take in that info and maybe they will make better choices for their kids, maybe less mcdonalds and more home cooked meals, more veggies on the plates, more healthier snack options maybe they will encourage more outside activities instead of ipads and video games, but leave the math and the fear and the calorie counting out of it for the kids, let them be kids, if your kid normally goes to the fridge and grabs a soda and cookies, let them do that but change the snacks, if they are hungry they will eat something else.

    This. This is something parents need to teach their children and the teacher relaying this to parents would be a better option.
  • coreyreichle
    coreyreichle Posts: 1,039 Member
    Crisseyda wrote: »
    Crisseyda wrote: »
    Crisseyda wrote: »
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    Crisseyda wrote: »
    My son is in cub scouts, and they had to learn about calorie counting for a recent badge. He's in fourth grade, and has no concept of obesity, weight loss, or calorie counting. They tracked calories for a week. They talked about how many calories were in what types of foods.

    I think it is absolute hogwash. It's worse than worthless; it is truly damaging advice. However, I didn't try to say anything about it during his scouts meeting. I know that the vast majority of people are largely misinformed. At home, I make up for this mainstream garbage by sharing evidence-based nutrition information. Calories are a meaningless measurement, based on no concrete evidence concerning human physiology. No calorie study ever has shown that people actually lose or gain weight in direct proportion to calories-in-calories-out.

    I teach my children how to distinguish real, nutrient-dense food from processed, nutrient-poor foods. How to avoid the latter in order to avoid both obesity and a whole slew of chronic illnesses. I teach them how to enjoy the rich and wholesome foods given to us by nature. I also cook almost every meal and pack their lunches at school. IMO, children should not be learning industry-sponsored dogma to count calories, they should be learning sound nutritional principles for understanding what their growing bodies need--however, if we were to do that, we wouldn't turn them into hungry little obesity-prone consumers of cheap, but profitable processed foods.
    Based upon the bolded, you're not sharing evidence-based nutrition information with your children. At all.

    In addition to the 148 studies annotated in the link above, here is research review which thoroughly discusses energy balance and many of the physiological, psychological and sociological factors which impact weight gain/loss. Note, however, that it relies fundamentally upon the irrefutable principles of energy balance: https://sites.uni.edu/dolgener/UG_Sport_Nutrition/Articles/Energy_Balance.pdf

    Gatorade Sport Science Institute! LMAO

    Yep, GSSI...
    The Institute is internationally recognized for its research and education offerings, which serve nearly 100,000 subscribers in more than 145 countries. In addition, more than 100 Student Research Grants have been awarded to research fellows and graduate students throughout North America, Latin America, Australia, Asia and Europe supporting research in a variety of areas.

    It's a foundation, named after it's seed money provider. Done quite often, ie "Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation", which has put out a number of papers regarding computer science, and they are seen as still reliable sources.

    You do realize this benefits Gatorade, because they engineer a product for athletes, to aid performance, and if their product were to be found sub-par for it's use, athletes would quickly discover that, and move onto better products, right?

    New Balance and Nike often commission research into foot and ankle issues, as well, so they can design better shoes.

    So you think Gatorade, aka sugar water, aids athletic performance? And are you suggesting it is a healthy drink?

    Yeah, I completely disagree with you. I agree with Dr. DiNicolantonio. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4975866/pdf/openhrt-2016-000469.pdf

    Dr. DiNicolantonio is a cardiovascular research scientist at Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute. Dr. DiNicolantonio is the author or co-author of over 150 medical publications and serves as the Associate Editor of British Medical Journal’s (BMJ) Open Heart. Dr. DiNicolantonio is on the editorial advisory board of several medical journals including Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases.

    The answer to that question depends entirely on why one is drinking the Gatorade. After a long run when all my energy stored are depleted, the electrolytes and sugar it provides are VERY healthy.

    Well, that's probably the least detrimental context in which to drink gatorade, but I still would not consider it healthy by a long stretch! I can run 10 miles without needing any kind of simple sugars to replace my glycogen stores, but, then again, my cells are fat-adapted, and I don't run out of glycogen very easily. And, of course, people who consume simple sugars while exercising are not going to ever have the chance to become adept at breaking down fat for fuel because the body will always preferentially burn excess carbohydrate over fat--it becomes a vicious cycle of dependence on exogenous sugar--but good luck with that!

    The only real reason one should be drinking Gatorade is as a supplement during athletic activities.

    And, yes, I can break down fat for fuel. Did it for 9 months or so, while losing weight. And, I have no desire to become fat adapted, as I'm not a fan of keto flu and pissing on dipsticks to maintain it. I'd personally prefer having a varied diet.
  • coreyreichle
    coreyreichle Posts: 1,039 Member
    Whit_88 wrote: »
    to kind of roll off ccsernica's post there...

    I think the things the teachers saying should be better relayed to the parents not the kids.
    Parents are the ones who set examples for their kids, if she wants to teach calories, invite the parents who want to learn to come and learn, let them take in that info and maybe they will make better choices for their kids, maybe less mcdonalds and more home cooked meals, more veggies on the plates, more healthier snack options maybe they will encourage more outside activities instead of ipads and video games, but leave the math and the fear and the calorie counting out of it for the kids, let them be kids, if your kid normally goes to the fridge and grabs a soda and cookies, let them do that but change the snacks, if they are hungry they will eat something else.

    This. This is something parents need to teach their children and the teacher relaying this to parents would be a better option.

    Except, childhood obesity is on the rise, along with children getting type II diabetes... So, we, as parents, are failing at this role.
  • Gallowmere1984
    Gallowmere1984 Posts: 6,626 Member
    Crisseyda wrote: »
    Crisseyda wrote: »
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    Crisseyda wrote: »
    My son is in cub scouts, and they had to learn about calorie counting for a recent badge. He's in fourth grade, and has no concept of obesity, weight loss, or calorie counting. They tracked calories for a week. They talked about how many calories were in what types of foods.

    I think it is absolute hogwash. It's worse than worthless; it is truly damaging advice. However, I didn't try to say anything about it during his scouts meeting. I know that the vast majority of people are largely misinformed. At home, I make up for this mainstream garbage by sharing evidence-based nutrition information. Calories are a meaningless measurement, based on no concrete evidence concerning human physiology. No calorie study ever has shown that people actually lose or gain weight in direct proportion to calories-in-calories-out.

    I teach my children how to distinguish real, nutrient-dense food from processed, nutrient-poor foods. How to avoid the latter in order to avoid both obesity and a whole slew of chronic illnesses. I teach them how to enjoy the rich and wholesome foods given to us by nature. I also cook almost every meal and pack their lunches at school. IMO, children should not be learning industry-sponsored dogma to count calories, they should be learning sound nutritional principles for understanding what their growing bodies need--however, if we were to do that, we wouldn't turn them into hungry little obesity-prone consumers of cheap, but profitable processed foods.
    Based upon the bolded, you're not sharing evidence-based nutrition information with your children. At all.

    In addition to the 148 studies annotated in the link above, here is research review which thoroughly discusses energy balance and many of the physiological, psychological and sociological factors which impact weight gain/loss. Note, however, that it relies fundamentally upon the irrefutable principles of energy balance: https://sites.uni.edu/dolgener/UG_Sport_Nutrition/Articles/Energy_Balance.pdf

    Gatorade Sport Science Institute! LMAO

    Yep, GSSI...
    The Institute is internationally recognized for its research and education offerings, which serve nearly 100,000 subscribers in more than 145 countries. In addition, more than 100 Student Research Grants have been awarded to research fellows and graduate students throughout North America, Latin America, Australia, Asia and Europe supporting research in a variety of areas.

    It's a foundation, named after it's seed money provider. Done quite often, ie "Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation", which has put out a number of papers regarding computer science, and they are seen as still reliable sources.

    You do realize this benefits Gatorade, because they engineer a product for athletes, to aid performance, and if their product were to be found sub-par for it's use, athletes would quickly discover that, and move onto better products, right?

    New Balance and Nike often commission research into foot and ankle issues, as well, so they can design better shoes.

    So you think Gatorade, aka sugar water, aids athletic performance? And are you suggesting it is a healthy drink?

    Yeah, I completely disagree with you. I agree with Dr. DiNicolantonio. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4975866/pdf/openhrt-2016-000469.pdf

    Dr. DiNicolantonio is a cardiovascular research scientist at Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute. Dr. DiNicolantonio is the author or co-author of over 150 medical publications and serves as the Associate Editor of British Medical Journal’s (BMJ) Open Heart. Dr. DiNicolantonio is on the editorial advisory board of several medical journals including Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Yes actually. In fact, I use Gatorade during my long runs, where drinking water alone is dangerous due to electrolyte depletion, not to mention to replenish my glycogen stores so I don't hit the wall.

    So, yes. It does aid athletic performance. Greatly, in fact. Gatorade also makes gus, gummies, etc that serve the same role. Gatorade also makes protein supplements, and preworkout supplements.

    And, I for one am glad there is a science research organization that is heavily involved in sports nutrition and hydration. Even if it was seeded by Gatorade.

    Unfortunately, Gatorade's protein products suck compared to most: https://labdoor.com/review/gatorade-recover-whey-protein-bar
  • angelexperiment
    angelexperiment Posts: 1,923 Member
    Sounds to me he's already on the edge of disordered eating and I'd have this addressed asap with counseling or whatever before it becomes too set in. 2 I think this is inappropriate for the gym teacher to address they address this in health and nutrition classes in a set curriculum and her advise is not appropriate in the manner she is teaching it. While it may be true some children who are obese may need to learn these things for their own benefit likely they will not pay attention to it. It needs addressed with parent and child. I would address this with the school board if she is not certified to teach nutrition she should not be teaching it.
  • Xvapor
    Xvapor Posts: 1,643 Member
    Nothing wrong with Gatorade
  • coreyreichle
    coreyreichle Posts: 1,039 Member
    Crisseyda wrote: »
    Crisseyda wrote: »
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    Crisseyda wrote: »
    My son is in cub scouts, and they had to learn about calorie counting for a recent badge. He's in fourth grade, and has no concept of obesity, weight loss, or calorie counting. They tracked calories for a week. They talked about how many calories were in what types of foods.

    I think it is absolute hogwash. It's worse than worthless; it is truly damaging advice. However, I didn't try to say anything about it during his scouts meeting. I know that the vast majority of people are largely misinformed. At home, I make up for this mainstream garbage by sharing evidence-based nutrition information. Calories are a meaningless measurement, based on no concrete evidence concerning human physiology. No calorie study ever has shown that people actually lose or gain weight in direct proportion to calories-in-calories-out.

    I teach my children how to distinguish real, nutrient-dense food from processed, nutrient-poor foods. How to avoid the latter in order to avoid both obesity and a whole slew of chronic illnesses. I teach them how to enjoy the rich and wholesome foods given to us by nature. I also cook almost every meal and pack their lunches at school. IMO, children should not be learning industry-sponsored dogma to count calories, they should be learning sound nutritional principles for understanding what their growing bodies need--however, if we were to do that, we wouldn't turn them into hungry little obesity-prone consumers of cheap, but profitable processed foods.
    Based upon the bolded, you're not sharing evidence-based nutrition information with your children. At all.

    In addition to the 148 studies annotated in the link above, here is research review which thoroughly discusses energy balance and many of the physiological, psychological and sociological factors which impact weight gain/loss. Note, however, that it relies fundamentally upon the irrefutable principles of energy balance: https://sites.uni.edu/dolgener/UG_Sport_Nutrition/Articles/Energy_Balance.pdf

    Gatorade Sport Science Institute! LMAO

    Yep, GSSI...
    The Institute is internationally recognized for its research and education offerings, which serve nearly 100,000 subscribers in more than 145 countries. In addition, more than 100 Student Research Grants have been awarded to research fellows and graduate students throughout North America, Latin America, Australia, Asia and Europe supporting research in a variety of areas.

    It's a foundation, named after it's seed money provider. Done quite often, ie "Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation", which has put out a number of papers regarding computer science, and they are seen as still reliable sources.

    You do realize this benefits Gatorade, because they engineer a product for athletes, to aid performance, and if their product were to be found sub-par for it's use, athletes would quickly discover that, and move onto better products, right?

    New Balance and Nike often commission research into foot and ankle issues, as well, so they can design better shoes.

    So you think Gatorade, aka sugar water, aids athletic performance? And are you suggesting it is a healthy drink?

    Yeah, I completely disagree with you. I agree with Dr. DiNicolantonio. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4975866/pdf/openhrt-2016-000469.pdf

    Dr. DiNicolantonio is a cardiovascular research scientist at Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute. Dr. DiNicolantonio is the author or co-author of over 150 medical publications and serves as the Associate Editor of British Medical Journal’s (BMJ) Open Heart. Dr. DiNicolantonio is on the editorial advisory board of several medical journals including Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Yes actually. In fact, I use Gatorade during my long runs, where drinking water alone is dangerous due to electrolyte depletion, not to mention to replenish my glycogen stores so I don't hit the wall.

    So, yes. It does aid athletic performance. Greatly, in fact. Gatorade also makes gus, gummies, etc that serve the same role. Gatorade also makes protein supplements, and preworkout supplements.

    And, I for one am glad there is a science research organization that is heavily involved in sports nutrition and hydration. Even if it was seeded by Gatorade.

    Unfortunately, Gatorade's protein products suck compared to most: https://labdoor.com/review/gatorade-recover-whey-protein-bar

    Oh, no doubt. I don't use their protein products myself. I use Aldi's brand Elevation :)
  • Xvapor
    Xvapor Posts: 1,643 Member
    Just looked I usually go through 24 gatordes every 2 weeks
  • jonchew
    jonchew Posts: 248 Member
    Theo166 wrote: »
    I just....lololol. We have a 300+ reply thread where people talk about the need to start educating people from a young age on CICO. Now we have someone do it, and a bunch of butthurt ensues. This is the real problem with trying to fix things from the current status quo. There's always gonna be one kid who takes it too far, and suddenly it'll be the curriculum at fault.

    ^^ times 10
    So what if the gym teacher wasn't perfect in the delivery that exercise compensates for overeating. This scenario isn't a crisis, it's basic parenting where you help them work through the good/bad and imperfect information they are picking up in the world.

    Kids pick up their attitudes about food in the home primarily. If both parents had eating disorders, and one child starts to show symptoms, don't be so quick blame it all on outside influences.

    ^^ Times 10, again.

    To be sure, there is no perfect way to communicate... anything. Seems to me the OP needs to calm-down, and find the valid takaway from the message.

    I applaud the gym instructor for offering a piece of valid knowledge, it seems to me that either the OP (or their kid) has personalized the point of the message, and has somehow turned it into some sort of insult.

    The takeaway of the message is that we should all be aware of what passes between our lips. The instructor continues to offer a valid alternative, if, in our awareness, we've discovered that we've eaten enough calories; a healthy snack, instead of a full-on meal.

    Where's the problem here??
  • CSARdiver
    CSARdiver Posts: 6,257 Member
    tomteboda wrote: »
    I agree PE needs to be a bigger element in everyday school life. Kids in the UK also have break time and lunch time in which, unless it's raining or snowing, kids go outside and run around twice a day. Is it the same in the US?

    Our students only get 15 minutes of total recess daily. It's appalling.

    We were able to get our kids into a tech charter school and it is wonderful. One of the the issues the parents and teachers both agree on is increasing physical activity. They get a minimum of 45 mins/daily. I also notice how thin the kids are in comparison to other schools. I would assume that this has more to do with environment and the parents being more actively engaged with their kids as this is a charter school.
  • KassLea22
    KassLea22 Posts: 112 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    KassLea22 wrote: »
    I'm skeptical that that's really what's being said, because it is being told to you by a Child who can sometimes misunderstand what an adult is saying. that's coming from someone who used to teach kindergarten. Have you talked to the teacher yourself?

    Several pages ago the OP stated that she has already been in a meeting with the teacher and the Principal. Teacher confirmed that this is what she said and the Principal agrees that it is inappropriate and has taken action

    Well I'm definitely not going to go back and read three pages of discussion, who has time for that?

    I think a main point of this this discussion seems to have turned into is it OK for health teachers to teach nutrition and into the topic of childhood obesity. Although now the conversation seems to have turned into a debate over Gatorade....

    for me I believe that teachers have a responsibility to teach good eating habits to their students as an overall rule.

  • witchywoman167
    witchywoman167 Posts: 13 Member
    In my humble opinion, the gym teacher should be teaching them what they taught us in the olden days (as my kids call the 80s and 90s). Don't eat a lot of junk and MOVE MOVE MOVE!
    It seems as if the gym teacher had some sort of eating disorder to be telling kids to burn off every meal.
    You have to be careful, because kids take what grownups say to heart. My son is 14 and in the 9th grade, 5'10, and around 140 lbs. Which makes him tall and no lanky. He used to come home every day with a bag full of chips and cookies from the cafeteria (yes, the SCHOOL cafeteria) I made an off handed remark about how if he wasn't careful, he'd be diabetic eating all that junk. He has since stopped bringing home junk, won't drink soda, etc. Don't get me wrong, these are changes for the better, but sometimes adults don't realize the impact of their words.
  • Verdenal
    Verdenal Posts: 625 Member
    cathipa wrote: »
    She should be speaking with the people who purchase and prepare the food - the parents

    The parents might get defensive. The school should have a well-researched presentation and have kids attend it and do projects and activities, like making a menu, going shopping, and cooking a healthy meal.

    Dietary education should be part of the curriculum and be taught early. Our kids need it.
  • CSARdiver
    CSARdiver Posts: 6,257 Member
    For those born past 1990 prepare to be triggered:



  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    KassLea22 wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    KassLea22 wrote: »
    I'm skeptical that that's really what's being said, because it is being told to you by a Child who can sometimes misunderstand what an adult is saying. that's coming from someone who used to teach kindergarten. Have you talked to the teacher yourself?

    Several pages ago the OP stated that she has already been in a meeting with the teacher and the Principal. Teacher confirmed that this is what she said and the Principal agrees that it is inappropriate and has taken action

    Well I'm definitely not going to go back and read three pages of discussion, who has time for that?

    I think a main point of this this discussion seems to have turned into is it OK for health teachers to teach nutrition and into the topic of childhood obesity. Although now the conversation seems to have turned into a debate over Gatorade....

    for me I believe that teachers have a responsibility to teach good eating habits to their students as an overall rule.

    I agree. The problem is that THIS teacher is teaching disordered nutritional thinking to her students who are too young to know the difference.
  • GYATagain
    GYATagain Posts: 141 Member
    Have to admit right up front, I've only read 1/2 of the comments - however, I urge the OP to talk directly to the teacher and then, if not satisfied, the principal. There are policies in place to help these types of issues. Now, then, please take this from an old woman that has worked 30+ years in Education, "If you will believe only 1/2 of what your child says when they come home about school/teacher; we will believe only 1/2 of what they say about home when they come to school". You all would never believe the things that are said in the "sharing" times in the classrooms. With that old adage out there, we all - meaning parents/students/staff of the school should ALWAYS keep the best interests of each and every student in mind. And ALWAYS be sure that all students are safe in body and mind. Also in those 30+ years the direction of exercise/activity/healthful living as taken a huge nosedive and like so many others have pointed out childhood obesity is increasing at an alarming rate!
  • estherdragonbat
    estherdragonbat Posts: 5,285 Member
    Eating all your calories for the day and "having" to have a handful of nuts for supper IS disordered thinking. For those calories, teacher could easily have had a couple of eggs and some veggies and felt a lot more full.