Q and A thread - Angus is peppered.

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Replies

  • SideSteel
    SideSteel Posts: 11,069 Member
    sardelsa wrote: »
    Hey @SideSteel!

    I was wondering your opinion on something. In terms of training for aesthetic, physique purposes (mostly) do you think women benefit from different type of training than men? I know women can do what men do.. no problem there.. but for optimal results I have seen so much research indicating we should be working differently... more frequency, more volume, etc. as I have heard women have a better ability to recover and more resistant to fatigue.

    Would love to hear your thoughts, thanks!

    This is a great question.

    If I'm being blunt I'd appeal to authority and say that Lyle McDonald is probably the go to on this one.

    I can tell you that in PRACTICE when working with female athletes, I tend to program similarly to males HOWEVER I'm also constantly monitoring for fatigue and rates of adaptation, and some of my female clients can handle higher amounts of volume and others cannot.

    And so putting this into practice you could very easily start with something slightly high on the volume end of things (higher rep ranges on certain exercises, additional sets on main exercises) and monitor rates of recovery. If you are able to recover and you are able to progressively overload (make progress) steadily then you can PROBABLY conclude that you are not doing "too much" volume.

    Finally though, I'll note that I don't subscribe to the idea of MRV -- however there probably is a sweet spot you should land in.

  • Tacklewasher
    Tacklewasher Posts: 7,122 Member
    When losing weight, is there an "expected" percentage that is fat vs LBM?

    I've been looking at my weight loss since I got a scale that takes a guess at fat %. So, from Feb 17th I've lost ~45 lbs, about 30 lbs of which is fat loss. I'm working out where I want to end up with weight loss and BF%, but have started lifting in August, and in those months it's been closer to 90% fat loss. Prior to that it shows as about 56% fat loss (if that's right, that's a huge freaking difference from lift weights vs. just running).

    Sidenote. This is the first time I've calculated this out, and I'm kinda stunned at the difference.

    First, Am I chasing my tail relying on the Fat % trend from a Withings scale as shown in Trendweight? I'm not picking an individual reading, but what the trend is showing.

    Second, is 80% fat loss vs weight loss a reasonable goal?
  • laur357
    laur357 Posts: 896 Member
    Barbell squats recently seem to be making the area right above my knee/upper kneecap "ache." It's a dull pain that comes with bending and straightening, no tenderness to the touch. It goes away if I don't squat for a few days.

    I've increased my reps and lowered the weight, and started squatting less frequently (2x a week instead of 3). Doesn't matter if I'm squatting 145lbs or 45lbs. (short, female, squatting regularly for about 5 months, PR 165)

    Any ideas? I've considered some form of mild tendonitis, or maybe I'm not regularly squatting deep enough to work all muscle groups evenly? It doesn't seem severe enough for a Dr. visit, but potentially seems like there's something I need to fix so I don't get a full blown injury.
  • clicketykeys
    clicketykeys Posts: 5,577 Member
    I dont understand what " Angus is peppered "means??

    that is my question.
    SideSteel wrote: »
    The original term was something potentially offensive for these boards so I won't post it, but people changed the original phrase to pepper your angus, which is something that caught on in the fitness community.

    A browser search for 'define pepper your angus' will bring up the original phrase if you look carefully enough.

    My question is - as a beginner, what sort of expectations should I set for myself in terms of progress? Like, I've poked around and consensus seems to be that when you can do 12 reps with good form, raise the weight 5 lbs and go back to 8 reps until you can do more. However... like... how long should I expect that to take? Obviously it's going to vary somewhat, but... I'd like to have SOME idea of how reasonable I'm being!
  • sardelsa
    sardelsa Posts: 9,826 Member
    Excellent.. makes sense. Thank you so much @SideSteel
  • SideSteel
    SideSteel Posts: 11,069 Member
    When losing weight, is there an "expected" percentage that is fat vs LBM?

    I've been looking at my weight loss since I got a scale that takes a guess at fat %. So, from Feb 17th I've lost ~45 lbs, about 30 lbs of which is fat loss. I'm working out where I want to end up with weight loss and BF%, but have started lifting in August, and in those months it's been closer to 90% fat loss. Prior to that it shows as about 56% fat loss (if that's right, that's a huge freaking difference from lift weights vs. just running).

    Sidenote. This is the first time I've calculated this out, and I'm kinda stunned at the difference.

    First, Am I chasing my tail relying on the Fat % trend from a Withings scale as shown in Trendweight? I'm not picking an individual reading, but what the trend is showing.

    Second, is 80% fat loss vs weight loss a reasonable goal?

    I'm not aware of any standard expectation. I would expect significantly different results depending on initial bodyfat levels, how lean someone ends up, training, diet, rate of loss, genetics, etc.

    I can tell you that from a practical standpoint, you should focus on the behaviors needed to reach the outcomes you want and trust that executing those behaviors will get you there.

    As this pertains to muscle mass, doing things like resistance training on a reasonable program, eat enough protein to support recovery and muscle repair, don't get too lean, don't lose too fast, and get enough sleep. If you do these things, you are quite likely hitting the big ticket items that will put you in a favorable spot to maintain muscle. You can't control where the numbers lie but you can execute those things to give you a good outcome.

    To your other questions:

    The main issue with using fat% as a metric is that all methods of body fat analysis are estimations with rather large error rates. Some of the error rates are so high that it makes the applicability of the measurement questionable at best depending on the method. Bioelectrical impedance is pretty bad on an individual level and it's not great with trends either due to it being heavily dependent on hydration status. The way I understand it (and I'll link a great series on this in case I'm misremembering it) is that hydration levels alter current rates, and the analysis tool is measuring the rate a current travels through you and using that rate to estimate body composition.

    Any measurement of bodyfat (outside of autopsy) is measuring something other than bodyfat and using that measurement to estimate bodyfat. For another example calipers measure skinfold thickness, not body-fat. They take skinfold measurements at various locations and use an equation to estimate.

    See here: https://weightology.net/the-pitfalls-of-body-fat-measurement-part-1/

    ^ That's a multi part series and it's great ^

    The problem with the second question (I worded that poorly -- it's not YOUR problem) is that it's dependent on whether or not we have an accurate means of assessing fat% in the first place. It is my opinion that we don't, due to errors in the measurement itself.

    If you were my client, I would encourage you to find other metrics that have more meaning to you and if you feel the need to set a goal, I would choose those metrics.

    Here are some ideas:

    "I would like to feel better about my body"
    "I would like to be able to bench press my bodyweight"
    "I would like to be able to feel comfortable on the beach in a swimming suit"
    "I would like to be able to run 1 mile without stopping"

    I am making those up as they may not be applicable to you, but these goals have varying levels of greater meaning to them. Some of these are not easily measured and so you could easily select ones that are if this is important to you.

    Finally, I think it's great you started lifting in August. I can't tell you with specific data, but I can reassure you that this will significantly alter the fat to lean mass ratio as far as dieting goes.
  • SideSteel
    SideSteel Posts: 11,069 Member
    laur357 wrote: »
    Barbell squats recently seem to be making the area right above my knee/upper kneecap "ache." It's a dull pain that comes with bending and straightening, no tenderness to the touch. It goes away if I don't squat for a few days.

    I've increased my reps and lowered the weight, and started squatting less frequently (2x a week instead of 3). Doesn't matter if I'm squatting 145lbs or 45lbs. (short, female, squatting regularly for about 5 months, PR 165)

    Any ideas? I've considered some form of mild tendonitis, or maybe I'm not regularly squatting deep enough to work all muscle groups evenly? It doesn't seem severe enough for a Dr. visit, but potentially seems like there's something I need to fix so I don't get a full blown injury.

    A few things to note:

    First, it's outside my scope of practice to diagnose or treat anything. Any information I provide you here is not a diagnosis or treatment, it's a random guy on the internet saying opinions.

    Next, I'm not educated as a physical therapist.

    Here is a resource on pain who I consider to be high quality. This is a broad article on knee pain covering the various types.

    This is not a substitute for proper treatment. If you experience this pain for longer than a week or two, I would consider consulting a physical therapist for a proper diagnosis.

    https://www.painscience.com/tutorials/patellofemoral-pain-syndrome.php
  • SideSteel
    SideSteel Posts: 11,069 Member
    I dont understand what " Angus is peppered "means??

    that is my question.
    SideSteel wrote: »
    The original term was something potentially offensive for these boards so I won't post it, but people changed the original phrase to pepper your angus, which is something that caught on in the fitness community.

    A browser search for 'define pepper your angus' will bring up the original phrase if you look carefully enough.

    My question is - as a beginner, what sort of expectations should I set for myself in terms of progress? Like, I've poked around and consensus seems to be that when you can do 12 reps with good form, raise the weight 5 lbs and go back to 8 reps until you can do more. However... like... how long should I expect that to take? Obviously it's going to vary somewhat, but... I'd like to have SOME idea of how reasonable I'm being!

    I tend to program in 4 week blocks for myself and clients. When doing an assessment for progress I will compare two things:

    1) What is their week to week progress compared to what I've programmed?
    2) What is their progress compared to the previous 4 week block during the same session?

    I would expect to see progress in #2 almost always. If I don't see progress from block to block I'd want to find out why.

    I'm struggling to stay awake so I'm going to send this as is, but I'll check in tomorrow on this thread and I'll also re-read this in case I'm just rambling. lol
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,702 Member
    I dont understand what " Angus is peppered "means??

    that is my question.
    SideSteel wrote: »
    The original term was something potentially offensive for these boards so I won't post it, but people changed the original phrase to pepper your angus, which is something that caught on in the fitness community.

    A browser search for 'define pepper your angus' will bring up the original phrase if you look carefully enough.

    ![/quote

    Yes, thank you i did so - never heard the term before.

    Must live a sheltered life here in rural Australia :o:o
  • clicketykeys
    clicketykeys Posts: 5,577 Member
    SideSteel wrote: »
    I dont understand what " Angus is peppered "means??

    that is my question.
    SideSteel wrote: »
    The original term was something potentially offensive for these boards so I won't post it, but people changed the original phrase to pepper your angus, which is something that caught on in the fitness community.

    A browser search for 'define pepper your angus' will bring up the original phrase if you look carefully enough.

    My question is - as a beginner, what sort of expectations should I set for myself in terms of progress? Like, I've poked around and consensus seems to be that when you can do 12 reps with good form, raise the weight 5 lbs and go back to 8 reps until you can do more. However... like... how long should I expect that to take? Obviously it's going to vary somewhat, but... I'd like to have SOME idea of how reasonable I'm being!

    I tend to program in 4 week blocks for myself and clients. When doing an assessment for progress I will compare two things:

    1) What is their week to week progress compared to what I've programmed?
    2) What is their progress compared to the previous 4 week block during the same session?

    I would expect to see progress in #2 almost always. If I don't see progress from block to block I'd want to find out why.

    I'm struggling to stay awake so I'm going to send this as is, but I'll check in tomorrow on this thread and I'll also re-read this in case I'm just rambling. lol

    When you program a 4 week block, how do you determine your prediction of progress, especially for someone new?
  • dandelion_85
    dandelion_85 Posts: 16 Member
    Yeh I completely read a word wrong also..
  • RuNaRoUnDaFiEld
    RuNaRoUnDaFiEld Posts: 5,864 Member
    I'm due a vertical total hysterectomy on December 20th,

    Which exercises will be best to help rebuild my pelvic floor muscles once I am cleared by the specialist?
  • richln
    richln Posts: 809 Member
    Should I use black pepper or habanero pepper for optimal results?
  • stanmann571
    stanmann571 Posts: 5,736 Member
    richln wrote: »
    Should I use black pepper or habanero pepper for optimal results?

    You'll want to use jellied Kentucky peppers.
  • SideSteel
    SideSteel Posts: 11,069 Member
    SideSteel wrote: »
    I dont understand what " Angus is peppered "means??

    that is my question.
    SideSteel wrote: »
    The original term was something potentially offensive for these boards so I won't post it, but people changed the original phrase to pepper your angus, which is something that caught on in the fitness community.

    A browser search for 'define pepper your angus' will bring up the original phrase if you look carefully enough.

    My question is - as a beginner, what sort of expectations should I set for myself in terms of progress? Like, I've poked around and consensus seems to be that when you can do 12 reps with good form, raise the weight 5 lbs and go back to 8 reps until you can do more. However... like... how long should I expect that to take? Obviously it's going to vary somewhat, but... I'd like to have SOME idea of how reasonable I'm being!

    I tend to program in 4 week blocks for myself and clients. When doing an assessment for progress I will compare two things:

    1) What is their week to week progress compared to what I've programmed?
    2) What is their progress compared to the previous 4 week block during the same session?

    I would expect to see progress in #2 almost always. If I don't see progress from block to block I'd want to find out why.

    I'm struggling to stay awake so I'm going to send this as is, but I'll check in tomorrow on this thread and I'll also re-read this in case I'm just rambling. lol

    When you program a 4 week block, how do you determine your prediction of progress, especially for someone new?

    Depends heavily (pun?) on the movement pattern, their comfort levels, their goals, general athleticism, age, etc.

    I'll try to give some context:

    If I'm working with an older client who isn't very athletic (to be clear, I mean this as objectively as possible and not with any sort of judgment attached to it) and doesn't necessarily care about maximal strength, I'll usually build repetitions while leaving load constant until they reach a rep ceiling at which point I'll add weight.

    One example might be

    Week 1
    Day 1
    Squat 3x8 @ 65lbs

    Week 2
    Day 1
    Squat 3x9 @ 65lbs

    Week 3
    Day 1
    Squat 3x10 @ 65lbs

    Week 4
    Day 1
    Squat 3x8 @ 70lbs

    etc


    If I have someone who is athletic, and does want to push the envelope a bit with strength, I'll try to get an estimate on some rep work like a 3rm or 5rm, I'll start them slightly under this and just add weight each week.


    In both of these examples though, I'm collecting feedback from them as far as effort goes using an autoregulatory system called RPE. It's something I teach the majority of my clients and it's something I either use directly in program design or it's something I build awareness of with the client so we can use it in the future. And so the kicker here is that even if I "program wrong" or miss the mark as far as progression goes, the feedback I get from the client will cause me to say "oh hey, I way over-did that bench press progression, let me dial it back, here"

    The concept behind RPE is to establish an estimation of how many repetitions they have remaining at the completion of a set, and it's a way to regulate effort and fatigue.

    Let me know if you have more questions, or more specific questions and I'm happy to take a look.
  • SideSteel
    SideSteel Posts: 11,069 Member
    I'm due a vertical total hysterectomy on December 20th,

    Which exercises will be best to help rebuild my pelvic floor muscles once I am cleared by the specialist?

    Great question. I'm awful with pelvic floor rehab and rehab in general, but the great news is, I know someone who is awesome at it. I just referred one of my long time clients to her and she (the client) is taking a few months off from me to focus on rehab. I've also done a Skype session with both of them so I could learn more about the rehab process, but I don't know nearly enough to responsibly comment on your issue.

    I wish you the best of luck with your surgery and I'd suggest getting thorough instructions from your surgical team on proper post surgery recovery, but having said that I will also leave you this info for reading:

    http://www.coreexercisesolutions.com/about-sarah/

    ^ She's awesome, and a very nice person too. If I have pelvic floor questions I'm asking her.
  • TR0berts
    TR0berts Posts: 7,739 Member
    As a baker, I say cake all the way. Especially carrot cake.........*drool*

    rMvM_f-maxage-0.gif
  • clicketykeys
    clicketykeys Posts: 5,577 Member
    SideSteel wrote: »
    SideSteel wrote: »
    I dont understand what " Angus is peppered "means??

    that is my question.
    SideSteel wrote: »
    The original term was something potentially offensive for these boards so I won't post it, but people changed the original phrase to pepper your angus, which is something that caught on in the fitness community.

    A browser search for 'define pepper your angus' will bring up the original phrase if you look carefully enough.

    My question is - as a beginner, what sort of expectations should I set for myself in terms of progress? Like, I've poked around and consensus seems to be that when you can do 12 reps with good form, raise the weight 5 lbs and go back to 8 reps until you can do more. However... like... how long should I expect that to take? Obviously it's going to vary somewhat, but... I'd like to have SOME idea of how reasonable I'm being!

    I tend to program in 4 week blocks for myself and clients. When doing an assessment for progress I will compare two things:

    1) What is their week to week progress compared to what I've programmed?
    2) What is their progress compared to the previous 4 week block during the same session?

    I would expect to see progress in #2 almost always. If I don't see progress from block to block I'd want to find out why.

    I'm struggling to stay awake so I'm going to send this as is, but I'll check in tomorrow on this thread and I'll also re-read this in case I'm just rambling. lol

    When you program a 4 week block, how do you determine your prediction of progress, especially for someone new?
    Depends heavily (pun?) on the movement pattern, their comfort levels, their goals, general athleticism, age, etc.

    (snip)

    If I have someone who is athletic, and does want to push the envelope a bit with strength, I'll try to get an estimate on some rep work like a 3rm or 5rm, I'll start them slightly under this and just add weight each week.

    In both of these examples though, I'm collecting feedback from them as far as effort goes using an autoregulatory system called RPE. It's something I teach the majority of my clients and it's something I either use directly in program design or it's something I build awareness of with the client so we can use it in the future. And so the kicker here is that even if I "program wrong" or miss the mark as far as progression goes, the feedback I get from the client will cause me to say "oh hey, I way over-did that bench press progression, let me dial it back, here"

    The concept behind RPE is to establish an estimation of how many repetitions they have remaining at the completion of a set, and it's a way to regulate effort and fatigue.

    Let me know if you have more questions, or more specific questions and I'm happy to take a look.

    So for someone who wants to "push the envelope" with strength, you'd start them at lower reps and more weight? Would you still do 3 sets? Would it look more like this:

    Week 1, day 1: Squat [email protected] (if their 5rm was 130); Week 2, day 1: Squat [email protected]; Week 3, day 1: Squat [email protected]

    (PS - If I am misunderstanding RPE or rm I'm sorry - I'm still pretty new at this! I looked it up and I *think* I get it but I could be wrong!)
  • RuNaRoUnDaFiEld
    RuNaRoUnDaFiEld Posts: 5,864 Member
    SideSteel wrote: »
    I'm due a vertical total hysterectomy on December 20th,

    Which exercises will be best to help rebuild my pelvic floor muscles once I am cleared by the specialist?

    Great question. I'm awful with pelvic floor rehab and rehab in general, but the great news is, I know someone who is awesome at it. I just referred one of my long time clients to her and she (the client) is taking a few months off from me to focus on rehab. I've also done a Skype session with both of them so I could learn more about the rehab process, but I don't know nearly enough to responsibly comment on your issue.

    I wish you the best of luck with your surgery and I'd suggest getting thorough instructions from your surgical team on proper post surgery recovery, but having said that I will also leave you this info for reading:

    http://www.coreexercisesolutions.com/about-sarah/

    ^ She's awesome, and a very nice person too. If I have pelvic floor questions I'm asking her.

    Thanks for the honesty and the referral.

    I'll look in to it once I get the ok.