Ketogenic Diet

2

Replies

  • priara31
    priara31 Posts: 27 Member
    veganbaum wrote: »
    priara31 wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    priara31 wrote: »
    Has anyone seen The Magic Pill? It's on Netflix. I just watched it and WOW, eye opening! I'm not sure if I'm ready to give up carbs, per se, because I want to start having oatmeal in the morning, but the rest of my food I think I can do keto. Hmm...we'll see.

    You can also find some really powerful documentaries on Netflix that will tell you the only way to be healthy is to go vegan, or do a juice fast

    Don't make health related decisions based on documentaries. They are entertainment. They are not required to tell you both sides of the story, or even required to tell you the truth at all.
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    priara31 wrote: »
    Has anyone seen The Magic Pill? It's on Netflix. I just watched it and WOW, eye opening! I'm not sure if I'm ready to give up carbs, per se, because I want to start having oatmeal in the morning, but the rest of my food I think I can do keto. Hmm...we'll see.

    As with most Netflix "documentaries", The Magic Pill is a one-sided propaganda piece of hack journalism which cherry-picks and flat-out misstates actual science. Pete Evans is nothing more than a celebrity chef, with no education or training in medicine and/or nutrition, and the Australian Medical Association has called for The Magic Pill to be removed from circulation, calling it "irresponsible" and saying "the risk of misinformation is too great".


    https://synapses.co.za/the-magic-pill-pete-evans-does-documentary/

    https://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/tv-and-radio/netflix-urged-to-pull-pete-evans-documentary-20180531-p4zim2.html


    On the flip side, you could watch Forks Over Knives or What The Health and be equally convinced that veganism is the miracle cure-all for everything and that you're killing yourself (and the rest of the world) by eating meat. Or you could watch Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead and be utterly convinced that you need to buy a juicer and drink all your meals from now on out.
    fb47 wrote: »
    priara31 wrote: »
    Has anyone seen The Magic Pill? It's on Netflix. I just watched it and WOW, eye opening! I'm not sure if I'm ready to give up carbs, per se, because I want to start having oatmeal in the morning, but the rest of my food I think I can do keto. Hmm...we'll see.

    Don't believe anything you watch in documentaries especially Netflix especially since they will cherry pick their data in order to create their documentary or else there wouldn't be a documentary to begin with.

    https://youtube.com/watch?time_continue=85&v=RFijW8A2Prc

    You will find all the research showing the flaws of the documentary on the link too.

    The thing about all these documentaries, whether they are "true" or not is this, the one thing they have in common is that eating healthy, whole, non-processed foods can help with a number of diseases, including obesity. Personally, I don't think there's anything wrong with vegan, keto, paleo, etc. As long as it includes healthy foods and takes non-processed foods and sugar out of the equation. I'm all for that! :) If any of those help people make healthier choices, then that's great.

    It would probably be most beneficial for the average person to start by understanding the first step they could take to "cure" their obesity is . . . eat less than they burn. That's it. It would take care of the obesity, and as they lose weight if there are other health issues those would likely improve as well.

    While the average person would also, on all probability, be better off health wise focusing more of their diet on whole foods, that's not necessary for weight loss. For a lot of people, one step at a time is more likely to lead to success than overhauling everything at once. I've seen lots of stories on MFP about individuals who started by losing weight by only tracking their food. As they lost weight and felt better, they started exercising. Then, they started eating a more well-rounded diet. But, taking "non-processed" foods and sugar out of the equation aren't necessary.

    And on a more specific note, veganism is a lifestyle choice based on ethics. It is not the same as plant-based and does not in and of itself denote a whole foods diet. It's pretty easy to be a junk food vegan. The average person in the U.S. likely eats junk food that's "accidentally" vegan, without knowing it at all. And while I think my diet is fairly well-rounded, I eat plenty of junk food. (This is not mean to start a debate about the term "junk food." Of course adding treats to a diet is fine, it all depends on context, etc., etc. I'm using it for ease-of-use to refer to what I would consider treat foods.)

    For dinner today I may have a Gardein Ultimate Burger (totally "processed") on Dave's Killer Bread (also "processed") with avocado and mixed greens and pickles ("processed") and "Bacon-Habanero" corn chips ("processed"), along with some zucchini and tomatoes left over from my weekly lunch prep. Today I've already had a banana, acai (because I like it), pineapple and blueberry smoothie bowl with cereal ("processed"), some watermelon, blackberries, almond milk ("processed"), coffee ("processed").

    During the week I have oatmeal loaded with lots of good stuff every morning, a big salad of mixed veggies with lettuce along with, typically, potato, sweet potato (sometimes mix in beets or carrots or fennel or squash; wintertime is often a variety of roasted veggies), avocado and some type of tofu/seitan/tempeh or bean for lunch, and dinner varies, but nearly always has some greens. Does my weekend "junk food" make my diet poor? No.

    The point of all of that is that context matters (and that veganism does not mean no junk food). It's not necessary to eat a diet of only whole, "non-processed" foods and no sugar.

    Very good point! And so true. I was once a "junk food" vegan. Mine though wasn't based on 'ethics', it was primarily because I was allergic (not lactose intolerant) to dairy, eggs and most shellfish. I remember being the vegan that learned not to eat any veggies. A fact that I'm not proud of now, although others laugh when I tell them this. I've since gone back to eating eggs and most dairy, although I stay away from shrimp, milk and ice cream.
  • nutmegoreo
    nutmegoreo Posts: 15,534 Member
    Keto is a way of eating that keeps me satiated and keeps me under my calorie limit. The fat/protein mix keeps me full and curbs my hunger. And there are ways to enjoy things you want to eat and make them keto friendly. Just requires some research and fun times in the kitchen! :)
    Long story short, if you can stay full on those macros and stay in a calorie deficit, then it may work for you. :)

    I'm very glad this is working for you.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    priara31 wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    priara31 wrote: »
    Has anyone seen The Magic Pill? It's on Netflix. I just watched it and WOW, eye opening! I'm not sure if I'm ready to give up carbs, per se, because I want to start having oatmeal in the morning, but the rest of my food I think I can do keto. Hmm...we'll see.

    You can also find some really powerful documentaries on Netflix that will tell you the only way to be healthy is to go vegan, or do a juice fast

    Don't make health related decisions based on documentaries. They are entertainment. They are not required to tell you both sides of the story, or even required to tell you the truth at all.
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    priara31 wrote: »
    Has anyone seen The Magic Pill? It's on Netflix. I just watched it and WOW, eye opening! I'm not sure if I'm ready to give up carbs, per se, because I want to start having oatmeal in the morning, but the rest of my food I think I can do keto. Hmm...we'll see.

    As with most Netflix "documentaries", The Magic Pill is a one-sided propaganda piece of hack journalism which cherry-picks and flat-out misstates actual science. Pete Evans is nothing more than a celebrity chef, with no education or training in medicine and/or nutrition, and the Australian Medical Association has called for The Magic Pill to be removed from circulation, calling it "irresponsible" and saying "the risk of misinformation is too great".


    https://synapses.co.za/the-magic-pill-pete-evans-does-documentary/

    https://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/tv-and-radio/netflix-urged-to-pull-pete-evans-documentary-20180531-p4zim2.html


    On the flip side, you could watch Forks Over Knives or What The Health and be equally convinced that veganism is the miracle cure-all for everything and that you're killing yourself (and the rest of the world) by eating meat. Or you could watch Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead and be utterly convinced that you need to buy a juicer and drink all your meals from now on out.
    fb47 wrote: »
    priara31 wrote: »
    Has anyone seen The Magic Pill? It's on Netflix. I just watched it and WOW, eye opening! I'm not sure if I'm ready to give up carbs, per se, because I want to start having oatmeal in the morning, but the rest of my food I think I can do keto. Hmm...we'll see.

    Don't believe anything you watch in documentaries especially Netflix especially since they will cherry pick their data in order to create their documentary or else there wouldn't be a documentary to begin with.

    https://youtube.com/watch?time_continue=85&v=RFijW8A2Prc

    You will find all the research showing the flaws of the documentary on the link too.

    The thing about all these documentaries, whether they are "true" or not is this, the one thing they have in common is that eating healthy, whole, non-processed foods can help with a number of diseases, including obesity. Personally, I don't think there's anything wrong with vegan, keto, paleo, etc. As long as it includes healthy foods and takes non-processed foods and sugar out of the equation. I'm all for that! :) If any of those help people make healthier choices, then that's great.

    Veganism is not about eliminating non-processed foods or sugar. Individual vegans may decide to eliminate or reduce non-processed foods or sugar, but that's no different than a non-vegan deciding to make that change.

    I do think that some people who want to eat healthier may do better if they choose a specific plan that includes dietary goals or restrictions. I personally know people who felt better after deciding to go vegan or paleo. But I think for weight loss, many people will find it more efficient and useful to focus on what actually matters -- calories.
  • eringrace95_
    eringrace95_ Posts: 289 Member
    edited August 2018

    OP, if it sounds like a way you would like eating, by all means try Keto, or perhaps a slightly less extreme low carb eating plan. If you find fats satiating and enjoy eating them enough to make them the majority of your calories, some people find it does the trick to keep them easily at their calorie goal. Good luck whatever you go with!


    Yeah I’m always looking for ways to stay satiated. I lost 50 pounds with simply CICO as an omnivore but now I’m vegetarian and I’m finding it hard to stay under calories without massive amounts of carbs so that’s one reason I wanted to cut back
  • LiftHeavyThings27105
    LiftHeavyThings27105 Posts: 2,104 Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    priara31 wrote: »
    Has anyone seen The Magic Pill? It's on Netflix. I just watched it and WOW, eye opening! I'm not sure if I'm ready to give up carbs, per se, because I want to start having oatmeal in the morning, but the rest of my food I think I can do keto. Hmm...we'll see.

    If you want oatmeal, than maybe low carb is a better choice.. or even a zone diet.


    And if anyone wants the legit science behind keto, go to the godfather of the diet Lyle McDonald. He is an actual researcher who isnt looking to get clicks. And he was one of the original people discussing ketogenic diets outaide atkins and medical intervention.

    And this is one book that I am absolutely going to get once I am "finished" with my current experiment (like how I did that, Mr. Lemon?)....
  • psychod787
    psychod787 Posts: 4,088 Member
    Sure, any diet can work, as long as you are adherent. Keto is fine. Hope ya don't like cake or bread