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76 Billion Opioid Pills Manufactured in USA 2006-2012

sidcorsini
sidcorsini Posts: 44 Member
Where are these going? What percentage of the American population is addicted, and how many mgs does that equal on average per person?
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Replies

  • LyndaBSS
    LyndaBSS Posts: 6,971 Member
    I don't want to minimize the opiate issue, but for context more Americans die preventably every year in car accidents, and no one bats an eye or considers that a crisis. I'm sure this will be a wildly unpopular view.

    This ^^^^
  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,276 Member
    I don't want to minimize the opiate issue, but for context more Americans die preventably every year in car accidents, and no one bats an eye or considers that a crisis. I'm sure this will be a wildly unpopular view.

    Just curious how a preventable car accident is defined. Sure impaired driving, link to some distraction etc. Anything else considered "preventable"?
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,968 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    I don't want to minimize the opiate issue, but for context more Americans die preventably every year in car accidents, and no one bats an eye or considers that a crisis. I'm sure this will be a wildly unpopular view.

    Just curious how a preventable car accident is defined. Sure impaired driving, link to some distraction etc. Anything else considered "preventable"?

    Drinking, texting, speeding, following too closely, outrunning brakes or sight lines, etc etc.
  • Derpes
    Derpes Posts: 2,032 Member
    I don't want to minimize the opiate issue, but for context more Americans die preventably every year in car accidents, and no one bats an eye or considers that a crisis. I'm sure this will be a wildly unpopular view.

    There isn't any real context, it is false equivalency.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 46,829 Member
    I don't want to minimize the opiate issue, but for context more Americans die preventably every year in car accidents, and no one bats an eye or considers that a crisis. I'm sure this will be a wildly unpopular view.
    True, but more people drive than actually take opiates. And at least with driving, there are consequences if people get caught breaking the law. For people that abuse opiates, there's really no way to curtail that cause it's an individual thing.

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  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,894 Member
    edited August 2019
    shaumom wrote: »
    Not to mention, the statistics on opioid addiction have a large percentage from people using illegal meds, not legal ones. The CDC admitted to lumping illegal and legal usage together in their statistics recently.

    There's often a connection between the two, however -- it starts with prescription and then moves into other sources.

    https://nihrecord.nih.gov/2018/05/18/author-recounts-how-opioids-took-hold-america

    Also "prescription" = illegal when obtained illegally too.

    The crisis is absolutely largely about illegal usage, not just doctors prescribing irresponsibly (although the history of that in various areas is relevant).
  • Crafty_camper123
    Crafty_camper123 Posts: 1,440 Member
    edited August 2019
    I think doctors prescribing it where opioids is not needed is somewhat part of the problem. A couple of real life examples:
    My husband had to go to the ER for a laceration (work injury, so he had to go). They ended up just cleaning the wound and bandaging him up (no stitches). They sent him home with a script for vicodin. He never filled it.

    A friend of somehow got a splinter in her eye when we were teens. She went to the ER to get the irritant removed from her eye, and they sent her home with a vicodin script, which I think she did fill and take. That same friend later broke her back on the job. Now this is a case where stronger pain meds would be warranted. But she took them beyond the point of needing them anymore, and ended up addicted. This sent her in a downward spiral of other drugs as well. FWIW though, she was the type that had what one could call an addictive personality. She was later arrested for selling opiates. Her story is a prime example of what now makes it so hard for people who really need it to get thier refills.

    My brother had scoliosis surgery (age 16 at the time). He was so afraid of taking his prescribed meds (opiates) after surgery, that he let his pain get to a point of passing out. He did take a couple of doses after that point, but got the direction from his doctor to take a combo if Ibuprofen and tylenol instead. That actually kept his pain at a managable level so he didn't have to take them.

    I'm not sure where I'm going with all this, but just wanted to share some expiriences and different outcomes. I'm not sure what the proper solution is. I know doctors could probably prescribe it less for less severe pain. Such as sticthes, minor injuries or outpatient surgeries. While I understand NSAIDS can cause stomach problems these are usually associated with long term use. It's really tragic though that people who really need it are treated like drug addicts. What do we do about it? I think medicinal marajuana is a step in the right direction for some people, as it's not as addictive and habit forming as opoids. But I suppose that's another debate all together.
  • mmapags
    mmapags Posts: 8,946 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    I've had 6 shoulder operations 2 hand operations, extensive nose/sinus surgery and several bouts of horrific (crawling on floor to bathroom level) back pain. I've been prescribed probably 1,000 opioid pills for these situation and actually took around 10-12. The side effects to me (foggy head, bathroom issues) were not worth any pain relief provided.

    Also on the chronic pain thing. In many cases (especially back issues) one can manage pain by such non-drug methods as proper exercise, movement and loosing weight. Unfortunately, we as a society like to choose the pill instead of doing the work.

    I'm 5'8 105 lbs. Doubt losing weight will help my severe chronic abdominal pain.

    C'mon man! You just need to tough it out and do the work. Not!! :p