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76 Billion Opioid Pills Manufactured in USA 2006-2012

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  • PhirrgusPhirrgus Posts: 1,839Member Member Posts: 1,839Member Member
    I'm going to assume this is the news bit OP is referring to..
    https://www.biospace.com/article/release-of-federal-database-reveals-76-billion-opioid-pills-were-sold-in-the-u-s-from-2006-2012/
    The DEA database also revealed some surprising information about what the companies knew about the number of pills entering the market. The database provided information about the exact number of pills being dispensed, when the companies were made aware of the volume of pills being dispensed, as well as year by year and town by town information, the Post said. The evidence seems rather damning particularly as these companies are the subject of thousands of lawsuits from state and local governments. The Post noted that the companies “allowed the drugs to reach the streets of communities large and small, despite persistent red flags that those pills were being sold in apparent violation of federal law and diverted to the black market.”

    The information in the database had long been held secret. However, a judicial order prompted the release of data up to 2013. U.S. District Judge Dan Polster said there is no basis for shielding older data, the Tribune Chronicle reported. The database information was released as part of ongoing opioid litigation in Ohio that targets manufacturers and distributors of opioids that have devastated communities across that state, as well as others. The lawsuits in Ohio target multiple opioid manufacturers, including Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Purdue Pharma, Teva Pharmaceuticals and Cephalon, as well as the primary distributors.

    In response to the release of the information in the database, a Mallinckrodt spokesperson told the Post that the company “produced opioids only within a government-controlled quota and sold only to DEA-approved distributors.” Actavis was acquired by Teva Pharmaceutical in 2016. A spokesperson for Israel-based Teva said the company is unable to speak about any systems regarding distribution that had been in place prior to the acquisition.

    The release of the information from the DEA database will likely be seen as a boon from plaintiffs in the thousands of cases against the opioid manufacturers and distributors. A large number of lawsuits argue that opioid manufacturers and distributors used misleading marketing practices that contributed to high levels of addition. Additionally, the lawsuits argue that the companies downplayed concerns over abuse and were complicit in a large number of opioid deliveries to certain pharmacies in areas hard hit by the epidemic.

    They mention the number of pills dispensed, but no guesstimate on the number of pills being funneled to the black market.
  • LyndaBSSLyndaBSS Posts: 2,881Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,881Member, Premium Member
    I was prescribed opioids after my three joint replacement surgeries and also for ice pick migraines.

    I don't have a genetic propensity for addiction, don't smoke, drink or do recreational drugs. I only took the drugs if the pain was obscenely over the top. I ended up with unused pills from every prescription.

    I can't believe that I'm the only person on the planet with this experience with opioids.
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 8,948Member Member Posts: 8,948Member Member
    Derpes wrote: »
    I don't want to minimize the opiate issue, but for context more Americans die preventably every year in car accidents, and no one bats an eye or considers that a crisis. I'm sure this will be a wildly unpopular view.

    There isn't any real context, it is false equivalency.

    You're right, there's no way you can compare dead people with dead people.
  • snickerscharliesnickerscharlie Posts: 8,100Member Member Posts: 8,100Member Member
    LyndaBSS wrote: »
    I was prescribed opioids after my three joint replacement surgeries and also for ice pick migraines.

    I don't have a genetic propensity for addiction, don't smoke, drink or do recreational drugs. I only took the drugs if the pain was obscenely over the top. I ended up with unused pills from every prescription.

    I can't believe that I'm the only person on the planet with this experience with opioids.

    I think there's a difference between using prescribed painkillers *as directed* under these circumstances, and under or over using them. I was you until I learned how detrimental foregoing these meds could actually be.
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 8,948Member Member Posts: 8,948Member Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    I don't want to minimize the opiate issue, but for context more Americans die preventably every year in car accidents, and no one bats an eye or considers that a crisis. I'm sure this will be a wildly unpopular view.
    True, but more people drive than actually take opiates. And at least with driving, there are consequences if people get caught breaking the law. For people that abuse opiates, there's really no way to curtail that cause it's an individual thing.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
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    Sometimes. If you want to make people really mad, do the speed limit, everybody behind you will lose their minds.

    The other day, I saw the aftermath of a guy with a really important text who rear ended a police car. That's impressive!

    I know that as a pedestrian and cyclist, my life is in far more danger from bad drivers than from pills. I spent a day in the ER and ICU and two weeks unable to walk several years ago because a dinner ran a red light.

    I just can't shake the feeling that this is a lot of fear mongering, a mountain out of a mole hill. The fact that no one really cares about the (more) people dying in traffic confirms my suspicion, it's not about the deaths.
  • mom22dogsmom22dogs Posts: 446Member Member Posts: 446Member Member
    LyndaBSS wrote: »
    I was prescribed opioids after my three joint replacement surgeries and also for ice pick migraines.

    I don't have a genetic propensity for addiction, don't smoke, drink or do recreational drugs. I only took the drugs if the pain was obscenely over the top. I ended up with unused pills from every prescription.

    I can't believe that I'm the only person on the planet with this experience with opioids.

    You aren't the only one. I took opioids for about 2 months after abdominal surgery to remove a huge ovarian cyst. I was having excruciating muscle spasms for some reason, and that was the only thing that worked. I didn't have any of the common side effects, and I just naturally started to wean off of them at about the 2 month mark. People can take them and not become addicted.
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 2,499Member Member Posts: 2,499Member Member
    LyndaBSS wrote: »
    I was prescribed opioids after my three joint replacement surgeries and also for ice pick migraines.

    I don't have a genetic propensity for addiction, don't smoke, drink or do recreational drugs. I only took the drugs if the pain was obscenely over the top. I ended up with unused pills from every prescription.

    I can't believe that I'm the only person on the planet with this experience with opioids.

    I can assure you, you're not the only one.
  • mbaker566mbaker566 Posts: 9,412Member Member Posts: 9,412Member Member
    LyndaBSS wrote: »
    I was prescribed opioids after my three joint replacement surgeries and also for ice pick migraines.

    I don't have a genetic propensity for addiction, don't smoke, drink or do recreational drugs. I only took the drugs if the pain was obscenely over the top. I ended up with unused pills from every prescription.

    I can't believe that I'm the only person on the planet with this experience with opioids.

    you aren't. i had some for when my autoimmune gets out of hand. right now i don't need any. but i have even had dirty looks for taking my nonopiod medications. there are times when i can get by with 1 pill of 1 medication a day. but there have been times where i was taking 3-4 medications a few times a day.
    i take as directed. i do have a mildly addictive personality but i've not ever felt addicted to any of my medications in the past 6 years
  • JeromeBarry1JeromeBarry1 Posts: 10,038Member Member Posts: 10,038Member Member
    sidcorsini wrote: »
    Where are these going? What percentage of the American population is addicted, and how many mgs does that equal on average per person?

    I don't know your agenda or motive for posting this discussion here. However, with all the lawsuits and publicity campaigns against the Sackler family, I'll play along.

    When my wife was in pain, opioids were prescribed abundantly, used occasionally, and never addictive.
    She couldn't stand the skin crawling sensation. Watching her suffer was no fun at all.

    The opioid manufactured tried to help. The doctors pretended to help.
    The medical schools charge too much for pill pushers.

    One of the 10 or 20, I lost track, doctors we saw for her quickly offered ACDF surgery, which she agreed to, and he did it perfectly, producing a pain-free not-addicted new lady. His school did a good job of training him.

    I'll readily agree that the U.S. has lost too many (1 is too many) citizens to opioid abuse. There's a problem there.
    However, the country has a huge portion of population suffering real pain who can, in fact, use the strongest opioids occasionally, as needed, without becoming addicted.
  • CSARdiverCSARdiver Posts: 5,848Member Member Posts: 5,848Member Member
    This issue originated prior to most pharmacovigilance systems in the 1990s where people vastly underestimated the impact of psychological addiction and the damage to receptor sites over long periods of time (>7 years).

    I've posted this before, but Jonathan Hari's TED talk is a must see on this topic:

    https://www.ted.com/talks/johann_hari_everything_you_think_you_know_about_addiction_is_wrong

    I suspect the root cause of much of this is a lack of purpose. We're at the point where we must pursue a collective good and find a common purpose. Opioid (or any drug) use is simply a symptom of this.
  • PhirrgusPhirrgus Posts: 1,839Member Member Posts: 1,839Member Member
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    This issue originated prior to most pharmacovigilance systems in the 1990s where people vastly underestimated the impact of psychological addiction and the damage to receptor sites over long periods of time (>7 years).

    I've posted this before, but Jonathan Hari's TED talk is a must see on this topic:

    https://www.ted.com/talks/johann_hari_everything_you_think_you_know_about_addiction_is_wrong

    I suspect the root cause of much of this is a lack of purpose. We're at the point where we must pursue a collective good and find a common purpose. Opioid (or any drug) use is simply a symptom of this.

    I think the root cause is greedy manufacturers. That's in line with the info in the link I posted above.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 2,875Member Member Posts: 2,875Member Member
  • CSARdiverCSARdiver Posts: 5,848Member Member Posts: 5,848Member Member
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    This issue originated prior to most pharmacovigilance systems in the 1990s where people vastly underestimated the impact of psychological addiction and the damage to receptor sites over long periods of time (>7 years).

    I've posted this before, but Jonathan Hari's TED talk is a must see on this topic:

    https://www.ted.com/talks/johann_hari_everything_you_think_you_know_about_addiction_is_wrong

    I suspect the root cause of much of this is a lack of purpose. We're at the point where we must pursue a collective good and find a common purpose. Opioid (or any drug) use is simply a symptom of this.

    I think the root cause is greedy manufacturers. That's in line with the info in the link I posted above.

    Applying Five Why principles - does this lead to another cause?

    Manufacturers are simply fulfilling a desire for product. This is a symptom of a larger cause.

    The DEA has known about this for decades as each shipment of schedule II pharmaceuticals is done under their purview. This is a CYA measure trying to pass blame onto another entity. Like one criminal ratting a colleague out for a lighter sentence. Are there corrupt manufacturers? Absolutely and they should be charged to the limit of the law. The only reason government took action is because public opinion shifted from "We want our drugs" to "Greedy manufacturers" - this is based upon emotion and not logic.

    What happened when the DEA began increasing the enforcement of narcotics? This resulted in an increase in heroin sales/use.

    https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/heroin.html
  • PhirrgusPhirrgus Posts: 1,839Member Member Posts: 1,839Member Member
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    This issue originated prior to most pharmacovigilance systems in the 1990s where people vastly underestimated the impact of psychological addiction and the damage to receptor sites over long periods of time (>7 years).

    I've posted this before, but Jonathan Hari's TED talk is a must see on this topic:

    https://www.ted.com/talks/johann_hari_everything_you_think_you_know_about_addiction_is_wrong

    I suspect the root cause of much of this is a lack of purpose. We're at the point where we must pursue a collective good and find a common purpose. Opioid (or any drug) use is simply a symptom of this.

    I think the root cause is greedy manufacturers. That's in line with the info in the link I posted above.

    Applying Five Why principles - does this lead to another cause?

    Manufacturers are simply fulfilling a desire for product. This is a symptom of a larger cause.

    The DEA has known about this for decades as each shipment of schedule II pharmaceuticals is done under their purview. This is a CYA measure trying to pass blame onto another entity. Like one criminal ratting a colleague out for a lighter sentence. Are there corrupt manufacturers? Absolutely and they should be charged to the limit of the law. The only reason government took action is because public opinion shifted from "We want our drugs" to "Greedy manufacturers" - this is based upon emotion and not logic.

    What happened when the DEA began increasing the enforcement of narcotics? This resulted in an increase in heroin sales/use.

    https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/heroin.html

    Wouldn't you agree that it's difficult to apply logic where all of the facts are not present at the time the decision is made?
    From above:
    https://www.biospace.com/article/release-of-federal-database-reveals-76-billion-opioid-pills-were-sold-in-the-u-s-from-2006-2012/
    The DEA database also revealed some surprising information about what the companies knew about the number of pills entering the market. The database provided information about the exact number of pills being dispensed, when the companies were made aware of the volume of pills being dispensed, as well as year by year and town by town information, the Post said. The evidence seems rather damning particularly as these companies are the subject of thousands of lawsuits from state and local governments. The Post noted that the companies “allowed the drugs to reach the streets of communities large and small, despite persistent red flags that those pills were being sold in apparent violation of federal law and diverted to the black market.”

    The information in the database had long been held secret. However, a judicial order prompted the release of data up to 2013. U.S. District Judge Dan Polster said there is no basis for shielding older data, the Tribune Chronicle reported.

    If the companies knew, yet kept that info secret and kept on pumping out pills....the math is rather suggestive to me.

    I do understand your point, but the opioid crisis wouldn't be what it is today if manufacturers cut their quota to meet actual needs as opposed to profit margins. In my humble opinion of course...
  • CSARdiverCSARdiver Posts: 5,848Member Member Posts: 5,848Member Member
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    This issue originated prior to most pharmacovigilance systems in the 1990s where people vastly underestimated the impact of psychological addiction and the damage to receptor sites over long periods of time (>7 years).

    I've posted this before, but Jonathan Hari's TED talk is a must see on this topic:

    https://www.ted.com/talks/johann_hari_everything_you_think_you_know_about_addiction_is_wrong

    I suspect the root cause of much of this is a lack of purpose. We're at the point where we must pursue a collective good and find a common purpose. Opioid (or any drug) use is simply a symptom of this.

    I think the root cause is greedy manufacturers. That's in line with the info in the link I posted above.

    Applying Five Why principles - does this lead to another cause?

    Manufacturers are simply fulfilling a desire for product. This is a symptom of a larger cause.

    The DEA has known about this for decades as each shipment of schedule II pharmaceuticals is done under their purview. This is a CYA measure trying to pass blame onto another entity. Like one criminal ratting a colleague out for a lighter sentence. Are there corrupt manufacturers? Absolutely and they should be charged to the limit of the law. The only reason government took action is because public opinion shifted from "We want our drugs" to "Greedy manufacturers" - this is based upon emotion and not logic.

    What happened when the DEA began increasing the enforcement of narcotics? This resulted in an increase in heroin sales/use.

    https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/heroin.html

    Wouldn't you agree that it's difficult to apply logic where all of the facts are not present at the time the decision is made?
    From above:
    https://www.biospace.com/article/release-of-federal-database-reveals-76-billion-opioid-pills-were-sold-in-the-u-s-from-2006-2012/
    The DEA database also revealed some surprising information about what the companies knew about the number of pills entering the market. The database provided information about the exact number of pills being dispensed, when the companies were made aware of the volume of pills being dispensed, as well as year by year and town by town information, the Post said. The evidence seems rather damning particularly as these companies are the subject of thousands of lawsuits from state and local governments. The Post noted that the companies “allowed the drugs to reach the streets of communities large and small, despite persistent red flags that those pills were being sold in apparent violation of federal law and diverted to the black market.”

    The information in the database had long been held secret. However, a judicial order prompted the release of data up to 2013. U.S. District Judge Dan Polster said there is no basis for shielding older data, the Tribune Chronicle reported.

    If the companies knew, yet kept that info secret and kept on pumping out pills....the math is rather suggestive to me.

    I do understand your point, but the opioid crisis wouldn't be what it is today if manufacturers cut their quota to meet actual needs as opposed to profit margins. In my humble opinion of course...

    The language used in these articles is purposefully misleading (disinformation) and absolves the three letter agencies of all responsibility - despite having complete oversight of sales and distribution.

    The DEA and FDA knew this information - have always known as manufacturing of schedule II product requires a monthly reconciliation. Additionally reconciliation is required at every point along the distribution chain. Nothing was kept secret, other than to the public.

    If you're going to place the blame on these manufacturers, then you must also place equal or greater blame on the government as they approved every transaction.
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