Considering going 90% vegan for better skin?

2

Replies

  • 777Gemma888
    777Gemma888 Posts: 9,580 Member
    See a dermatologist first before opting for a dietary change.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,298 Member
    TrishSeren wrote: »
    Unless you are getting your skin products from a certified dermatologist or a skin spa then they aren't doing anything. Supermarket, drugstore, Sephora etc, all of those products are pretty much useless because they don't have enough of the vital ingredients to have any effect on your skin.

    Retinol is a perfect example, used incorrectly it can burn the skin. There are plenty of low dose retinol products you can buy off a shelf but they wouldn't do anything because you need a higher dose for it actually work. However, for a dose that's high enough to work, it needs to be a professional product which you can only buy from a skin spa or dermatologist as they have to advise the usage.

    I spend $100s on my skincare but it's a pretty simple routine, cleanse, eye cream, serum, moisturiser and sunscreen. Retinol added in at night only. Once a week I exfoliate with an acid peel. I get asked all the time what I use and have referred so many people to my skin specialist because what the sell and recommend actually works.

    If you can't afford quality skincare then here are some basic tips from my skin specialist.
    - use a clean face cloth every day
    - don't ever exfoliate with beads or gritty exfoliators, these are too rough for your face skin and cause damage
    - take fish oil (if you don't eat heaps of fish)
    - sunscreen every day

    Thank you for the tips!! Great ones :). I have been switching a couple things to natural products, there is a booth at my local farmer's market where the products are very simple yet effective, she researches all ingredients. https://mrsbsoap.com/ I use her sensitive skin soap and facial serum.

    If anyone is interested, or wants to audit my routine...: :)

    - I shower every morning with luke warm to cool water, but only use soap everywhere every other day (other days are rinsing), except I always wash between my legs and armpits :)
    - The body soap I use Ingredients: Saponified Coconut & Organic Olive Oil • Vitamin E
    - I put on organic coconut oil after my shower to lock in moisture on my body
    - I use a super natural face serum from my local farmer's market (Ingredients: Argan Oil, Jojoba Oil, Grapeseed Oil, Essential Oil, Vitamin E)
    - I use Neutrogena daily SPF moisturizer for my face
    - Banana boat sport 50 SPF for my body (probably needs to be changed)
    - At night I use Aveeno gentle foaming cleanser and Neutrogena deep moisture night cream

    There are a number of results for both sunscreens:
    https://www.ewg.org/sunscreen/about-the-sunscreens/?search=Neutrogena+daily
    https://www.ewg.org/sunscreen/about-the-sunscreens/?search=Banana+boat+sport+50

    Hopefully Banana Boat has reformulated since I was using it in the early 2000s, but at that time it did not protect against both UVA and UVB.

    After the report came out about chemical vs mineral sunscreen, I switched to mineral.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,298 Member
    EmBeatie wrote: »
    Why would an ethical vegan want to discourage other people from going vegan? That's a first.

    If you are referring to this post, I thought it was self explanatory:
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    While I applaud ethical vegans, many of the benefits I see about veganism on the internet seem overblown.

    Probably your best bet is to consult a dermatologist.

    What brand of sunscreen do you use? You could be reacting to an ingredient in that. Run your sunscreen through https://www.ewg.org/sunscreen/

    If you are not already using a mineral-based (zinc oxide and/or titanium dioxide) sunscreen, consider switching.

    https://www.ewg.org/sunscreen/report/the-trouble-with-sunscreen-chemicals/

    ...FDA has put the entire sunscreen industry on alert by proposing that in just two instances do we have enough safety information about ingredients to determine whether they’re safe and effective: zinc oxide and titanium dioxide. For 12 other ingredients, the FDA has said there isn’t enough data to determine whether they’re safe. In particular, FDA raised concerns about the substantial skin absorption of oxybenzone, its potential to affect hormone levels and the increased absorption susceptibility of children (FDA 2019). Lab studies shows that some chemical UV filters may mimic hormones, and physicians have reported sunscreen-related skin allergies, which raises important questions about unintended human health consequences from frequent sunscreen application.

    This... as someone who's been a vegan for well over a decade now, the magic is all woo. Ethics are one thing, but if you're considering going vegan for another reason, I'd urge you to re-consider. It's not nearly as tough as it used to be, but it still does require a reasonable education in what your body needs and how to get it as well as time and effort meal planning if you are to maintain optimal nutrition on a vegan diet. It can be quite a bit to bite off for most and many come into it unprepared and end up damaging their health. If you don't have a medical or ethical reason to do it then I would strongly suggest sticking to something more closely resembling your normal way of eating and adjusting that. Not to mention that too many lifestyle changes or too large of changes can be unsustainable for many, especially on the short term.

  • madwells1
    madwells1 Posts: 510 Member
    TrishSeren wrote: »

    I spend $100s on my skincare but it's a pretty simple routine, cleanse, eye cream, serum, moisturiser and sunscreen. Retinol added in at night only. Once a week I exfoliate with an acid peel. I get asked all the time what I use and have referred so many people to my skin specialist because what the sell and recommend actually works.

    If you can't afford quality skincare then here are some basic tips from my skin specialist.
    - use a clean face cloth every day
    - don't ever exfoliate with beads or gritty exfoliators, these are too rough for your face skin and cause damage
    - take fish oil (if you don't eat heaps of fish)
    - sunscreen every day

    Not to derail veganism, but ditto on the simple basic routine. I'm a skincare junkie, have tried everything known under the sun, but always come back to the basics.
    1. Wash, every day, morning and night. I use a combo of products because I like them and what they do for my skin, but this will be personal preference for the most part. Note that they are all under $10 a piece.
    2. I never use a wash cloth. I may be quite different than most, but I survive on the splash method. Tons of times. I have to clean my bathroom every time I wash my face:)
    3. At night, I like witch hazel as an astringent, but also use micellar water that I got in France and I love it.
    4. In the morning, I follow with vitamin c serum (I won't name the brand for fear of people thinking I'm plugging it)
    5. ...then a light facial serum
    6. ...then a daily light moisturizer
    7. ...then sunscreen.
    8. At night, I usually just put on serum and a heavier moisturizer.


      Like @TrishSeren, I also do a once a week micro-peel. and probably every month I do a T-zone mask after using hot water steam bath. If I have any problem areas, I treat with dermatologist products.

      Everyone has different skin needs, so take everything above with a grain of salt. Diet plays an important part, but so does good skin care (not expensive, just methodical and daily). Our skin is the largest organ of our body, and is the first part of us that takes the toll.

      *Note, I was a vegan in the 90's and all I can remember are these:
      nu1ad6gz1fgv.jpg

      Probably not the best choice for good skin!!!
  • nooshi713
    nooshi713 Posts: 4,775 Member
    I have known people who ate mostly junk food and unhealthy fast food who had clear skin and very healthy eaters who have bad skin. Skin quality is largely determined by genetics and hormones.

    I eat a plant based diet now 95% of the time and haven’t noticed a significant difference yet. But, I know several vegans whose skin absolutely glows. I still break out even though I’m dairy free. I have done dairy free trials in the past with no effect. However, I do feel eating mostly plant based is in general healthier. Eating lots of fruits and vegetables have other health benefits besides to the skin.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    I have found that less is more when it comes to skincare. I have always used basic soap and water on my face plus sunscreen. My skin has always been clear (except a year or so at puberty and a year or so at menopause) and I still don't have crowsfeet at age 62. My diet seems to have no effect on my skin.

    Skin is similar to hair: the more you cleanse it, the more it will try to replace the oils the cleansing stripped away.
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,257 Member
    edited August 2019
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I am really confused when people say they are going part vegan. Surely you are either Vegan or something else.

    I was under the impression that Veganism was entirely plant based lifestyle, no animal products whatsoever in your life not just your diet.

    I am not trying to be rude but how can you be 90% Vegan I am genuinely interested in the answer. Thank you.

    Right, "90% plant-based" would be more accurate but I understood what she wanted to convey.

    My mom also says "vegan" when she means "plant-based".

    I think 33% (or less, considering most people's dinner is the biggest meal of the day) would be more accurate for what OP describes:


    I am considering trying to do every meal except dinner vegan.


    OP, what is it you're hoping to accomplish? If you think meat or animal products are doing something bad to your skin, I strongly doubt that having meat and animal products one meal a day is going to accomplish anything. That's not going to stop you from having a reaction, if your skin issues are reactions to something in animal products.



    Edited to fix percentage. I shouldn't deal with numbers at the end of a long day.
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    EmBeatie wrote: »
    Why would an ethical vegan want to discourage other people from going vegan? That's a first.

    Because they recognize that not everyone shares the same ideals as they do and that that is ok depending on the ideals?
  • BarbaraHelen2013
    BarbaraHelen2013 Posts: 1,761 Member
    edited August 2019
    Coming at this from a slightly different angle, I think it’s not so much what you’re eating or what you’re putting on your skin, but more that you’ve recently lost a fair amount of weight. Logically, until recently, that skin has been somewhat stretched over the subcutaneous fat and now is not so stretched. Even whilst stretched the tiniest blood vessels (capillaries) have reached every part of that skin. It takes time for the skin to adjust its water balance, repair and shrink back. At 26 this will happen, given a relatively healthy diet (nothing extreme, just a normal balanced diet - whatever ‘normal’ is to you!).

    Of course, good diet and skincare will help, but I think time is going to be the best ‘treatment’ in the end.

  • deputy_randolph
    deputy_randolph Posts: 941 Member
    edited August 2019
    I'm not sure if anyone suggested seeing an Allergist. If you eliminated foods in your teen years (by being vegan) and your skin improved, it's possible that your current redness/irritation/inflamation is food allergy related.

    My daughter (as a baby) had eczema; her skin was very red and irritated. Through testing, it waa determined she was allergic to nuts, peanuts, milk, eggs, coconut. I eliminated those and her sking improved dramatically.

    There are other good suggestions here: switching to mineral based sunblock made a difference for all of us. The chemical based was causing redness and stinging.

    I found that I "overwashed" my face. In my early 30s, my skin started becoming drier. I switched to Cetaphil to cleanse my face at night, moisturize at night, and only splash water on my face in the AM. No breakouts and my skin isn't nearly as dry as when I was washing with soap twice a day.

    ETA: someone suggested the use of too many products. I also did this. I've found 1 soap (very mild) and 1 line of moisturizing product. Reducing the amt of product I use seems to help reduce the "stress" on my skin. Also, coconut oil kills my face! My body is fine with it though.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,298 Member
    Re: too many products - my skin care routine consists mainly of:
    1. Shampoo hair.
    2. Wash face with sudsy hands.

    I don't shampoo every day, and if, and only if, my face feels greasy in between, I wash it with liquid soap, which used to also be the same brand of shampoo that I had in a pump bottle on my sink. But my sister made me some liquid soap and now I make it myself too.

    Here's the recipe: https://bodyunburdened.com/diy-all-natural-rich-creamy-moisturizing-hand-soap/
    I used rose castille soap and rose massage oil. Didn't need any essential oils. I didn't have guar gum and xanthum gum worked fine. Best liquid soap ever!

    My skin rarely gets dry, and if, and only if, it really needs moisturizer will I apply a brand that the EWG database doesn't freak out about. What's helps me from getting dry skin in the winter is keeping the heat low. I think oily foods like fatty fish and fish oil supplements help as well.

    I have fair Irish skin and burn easily. My sunscreen routine is:
    1. Stay out of sun
    2. Wear a hat when being in the sun is unavoidable
    3. Wear mineral-based sunscreen when swimming in the pond

    I do get some sun on my arms when gardening, but this time of year I wait until late afternoon to work outside.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    Coconut oil makes my skin break out. Last winter it got very cold and my skin felt dry. I used coconut oil because I thought it would help and my face was all splotchy colored for a few days, not to mention acne (the kind you get from clogged pores). Your skin can react to anything, even if it's natural, so look into your skin care routine using an elimination process and don't ignore any natural products in your investigation.

    Coconut oil is actually bad for oil prone skin. It has a comedogenic rating of 4 (on a scale of 5).
  • concordancia
    concordancia Posts: 5,320 Member
    Here is another vote for figuring out what your triggers are.

    I can't use aloe vera, mineral sunscreens sting more than chemical ones on my skin. I prefer sunshirts and hats.

    I am a minimalist when it comes to skin care. I use plain water every morning and right after a sweaty workout. Unless my face looks or feels dirty, I only use a liquid soap in the shower and usually only a couple of times a week. My husband is still acne prone in his 30s and has found an improvement using less, as well. Despite all this anecdotal evidence, I doubt it would work for everyone. Just pick something new and give it a try for awhile.before changing something else.
  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,331 Member
    edited August 2019
    earlnabby wrote: »
    Coconut oil makes my skin break out. Last winter it got very cold and my skin felt dry. I used coconut oil because I thought it would help and my face was all splotchy colored for a few days, not to mention acne (the kind you get from clogged pores). Your skin can react to anything, even if it's natural, so look into your skin care routine using an elimination process and don't ignore any natural products in your investigation.

    Coconut oil is actually bad for oil prone skin. It has a comedogenic rating of 4 (on a scale of 5).

    I didn't know that at the time and had to learn the hard way. I don't really know much about skin care. My skin care routine is minimal: 1. wash face with plain water in the morning 2. wear sunscreen if outside for more than 10 minutes because any longer than that and I get sunburns 3. wash sunscreen off because I don't like the feeling of products on my skin.
  • unicorngems
    unicorngems Posts: 56 Member
    I never knew Brazil nuts came with a health warning. I've never seen a recommended daily allowance on a packet....but I suppose you learn something new everyday!
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    <snip to reduce reply length>
    So it's not realistic to imagine that eating an avocado or a piece of salmon will deliver healthy fatty acids straight to your skin. That being said, it's a good idea to incorporate skin-healthy foods into your diet, especially olive oil, avocados, salmon, sunflower seeds, Brazil nuts, wheat germ, broccoli, and leafy greens.
    <snip>

    Not disputing anything in the quoted post, but please don't use a "more is better" rule with brazil nuts and eat an ounce daily.

    They're such an excellent source of selenium that 5-6 nuts daily could exceed recommended safe upper limits.

    https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Selenium-HealthProfessional/

    I love brazil nuts: It made me sad to learn this.

    The only time i get Brazil nuts is when I buy a bag of mixed nuts in the shell for winter. Takes so long to crack those shells eating too many is not an issue (the filberts in the bag on the other hand . . . )

  • apullum
    apullum Posts: 4,888 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    <snip to reduce reply length>
    So it's not realistic to imagine that eating an avocado or a piece of salmon will deliver healthy fatty acids straight to your skin. That being said, it's a good idea to incorporate skin-healthy foods into your diet, especially olive oil, avocados, salmon, sunflower seeds, Brazil nuts, wheat germ, broccoli, and leafy greens.
    <snip>

    Not disputing anything in the quoted post, but please don't use a "more is better" rule with brazil nuts and eat an ounce daily.

    They're such an excellent source of selenium that 5-6 nuts daily could exceed recommended safe upper limits.

    https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Selenium-HealthProfessional/

    I love brazil nuts: It made me sad to learn this.

    I had no idea. It’s learning important stuff like this that makes the forums worthwhile.