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Emotional Support Dog at the Gym

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  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 2,962Member Member Posts: 2,962Member Member
    Also horses live significantly longer than dogs.
  • vanityy99vanityy99 Posts: 745Member Member Posts: 745Member Member
    Dogs are gross but that little horsey or pony is so cute, I prefer that all day.
  • weatherwoman94weatherwoman94 Posts: 14Member Member Posts: 14Member Member
    I don't think there's anything wrong with it, as long as they're well trained
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Posts: 19,722Member Member Posts: 19,722Member Member
  • OpulentBobbleOpulentBobble Posts: 15Member Member Posts: 15Member Member
    There are a lot of common misconceptions here. If you are talking about the US, an emotional support animal is NOT the same as a support animal.

    An emotional support animal is a companion and is given extremely limited specific rights. Essentially the animal can fly with you on a plane and cannot be barred from pet free apartments. There may be a few other allowances but emotional support animals are not allowed in most public places.

    Support animals are (supposed) to be well trained animals that perform a specific task for a person with a disability. However, support animals do not need to go through specific training, pass any specific test, or get any certification. (This is true, seriously). This is because it is viewed as a barrier for a disabled person if they are told they cannot train their own service animal. Therefore, service animals must meet three requirements: 1) be owned by a disabled person 2) perform a task that alleviates the disability in some way 3) does not pose a threat to others or interfere with the function of a business. There is also no proper identification for a service animal, so someone can claim virtually any dog is a service dog and there are no consequences.

    If their dog was an emotional support animal, they had no right to be there. If their dog was a service dog they had the right to be there, though they should never be off leash/at large unless their handler has become incapacitated (some service dogs are alert dogs).

    Unrelated but another commonly misunderstood term is therapy dog. Therapy dogs, ironically, require the most training and have the least rights. Most therapy dogs complete a CGC test with an added therapy modification. Therapy dogs visit schools and hospitals to interact with people who would benefit from their presence. No added rights.
  • OpulentBobbleOpulentBobble Posts: 15Member Member Posts: 15Member Member

    There are a lot of common misconceptions here. If you are talking about the US, an emotional support animal is NOT the same as a support animal.

    An emotional support animal is a companion and is given extremely limited specific rights. Essentially the animal can fly with you on a plane and cannot be barred from pet free apartments. There may be a few other allowances but emotional support animals are not allowed in most public places.

    Support animals are (supposed) to be well trained animals that perform a specific task for a person with a disability. However, support animals do not need to go through specific training, pass any specific test, or get any certification. (This is true, seriously). This is because it is viewed as a barrier for a disabled person if they are told they cannot train their own service animal. Therefore, service animals must meet three requirements: 1) be owned by a disabled person 2) perform a task that alleviates the disability in some way 3) does not pose a threat to others or interfere with the function of a business. There is also no proper identification for a service animal, so someone can claim virtually any dog is a service dog and there are no consequences.

    If their dog was an emotional support animal, they had no right to be there. If their dog was a service dog they had the right to be there, though they should never be off leash/at large unless their handler has become incapacitated (some service dogs are alert dogs).

    Unrelated but another commonly misunderstood term is therapy dog. Therapy dogs, ironically, require the most training and have the least rights. Most therapy dogs complete a CGC test with an added therapy modification. Therapy dogs visit schools and hospitals to interact with people who would benefit from their presence. No added rights.

    ^^^^my mistake. This is incorrect.

    Emotional support animals are not the same as SERVICE animals. I wrote this at almost 1am, I need to just go to bed 😂 so this is the revision:
    “Service animals are (supposed) to be well trained animals that perform a specific task for a person with a disability. However, service animals do not need to go through specific training, pass any specific test, or get any certification. (This is true, seriously). This is because it is viewed as a barrier for a disabled person if they are told they cannot train their own service animal. Therefore, service animals must meet three requirements: 1) be owned by a disabled person 2) perform a task that alleviates the disability in some way 3) does not pose a threat to others or interfere with the function of a business. There is also no proper identification for a service animal, so someone can claim virtually any dog is a service dog and there are no consequences.”

  • MichSmishMichSmish Posts: 1,565Member, Premium Member Posts: 1,565Member, Premium Member
    firef1y72 wrote: »
    Azdak wrote: »
    Cahgetsfit wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    I actually don't believe in service dogs from an ethical standpoint. I just don't think any sentient being should be conscripted to a lifetime of 24/7 servitude.

    What I coincidence @33gail33. I was just chatting on another forum about the incredible strides my niece has taken since her mom and dad were able to acquire a service dog for her. She is autistic, and since having the dog she has made incredible progress in being able to interact with family and friends as well as simple daily functions.

    Oh, she has also just recently started eating again, the animal is helping her overcome the food rejection common with some autistic folks.

    The dog? She's a yellow lab mix. 100% part of the family, loved and treated like gold by everyone, and anyone who knows anything at all about dogs could clearly see the joy she has in going through her routine, hanging tight by my niece and just loving that girl.

    It's very much a partnership. So, your post ...well...there is nothing even worth carrying on a conversation about, but it did warrant a reply.

    The show Cat From Hell now has a Cat from Heaven segment and one featured a cat who had similarly positive effects on an autistic child. There was also one about a cat who goes to a local library and helps kids who have trouble reading feel more comfortable.

    I mean, if we are still on the dogs as employees analogy, I'm going to concede that they are generally going to be better employee types than cats, but I had to plug a couple of cats too!

    ;-)

    There's everything right with a good cat :) I admit it's difficult to imagine a cat as a service animal/companion, but suffice to say I believe a fair number of humans sorely underestimate the benefit and value our 4 legged friends can add to a life. :)

    We adopted a cat from our neighbours a few years ago before they moved. We already had two other cats at the time.

    My daughter struggles with clinical depression and anxiety, as well as some physical issues. From day one, Simon latched onto her as his 'person.' He just knows when she's not having a good day and won't leave her side at those times. There have been lots of times when I know she's having a particularly rough time simply by watching him.

    He has the gift of always being able to calm her when she's anxious, and make her smile when her depression flares. He's her silent, non-judgemental therapy companion, and worth a million bucks to us all. <3

    A good companion tends to be amazing that way. :) It blows my mind sometimes that some folks can't see a family dog or cat as family. They are, very much so.

    I know this won't be a popular opinion....I'm sorry in advance for those I'll offend.

    I have absolutely no problem with you feeling that way about your dog. I do have a problem if you expect everyone else to feel the same way about your pet. Believe it or not, there are people that do not like dogs, are afraid of dogs, or just do not want to be around them.

    I don't believe they should have all the "rights" of a human member of your family, and that means respecting the rules of public places. To be clear, I'm not saying that you personally do this, but there seems to be a huge uptick in people bringing their dogs to stores, restaurants, etc. and expecting that this is no problem for everyone. I also see more and more people ignoring leash laws in public parks. It's really an issue of respect for your fellow humans.

    You're not alone.

    I don't mind dogs. Particularly well mannered dogs. But I DO mind dogs that come and jump on me and slobber on me and all that without my inviting them to do it.

    My brother had a dog. It was as poorly behaved as his children. I have no patience for either. The fault lay 100% in the parenting on that front because a bit of a trend there if the kids AND the dog are all unfit for being out and about...

    If they weren't my family I probably would not have anything to do with them. But... family, so I love them, but I don't necessarily LIKE them.... if that makes any sense.

    Cats on the other hand can jump on me all they like. But they don't because cats LOL!!!!

    As you can see from my avatar, I am a dog person. He is an important part of our family and our lives. We love him to death and like to take him with us when we can.

    However, he is still a dog, not a human. The basic rules of etiquette still apply. My love for my dog and my desire to indulge him and make him happy extends to the end of the leash--and sometimes not even that far.

    When we are out walking and we approach someone else--especially if they are running or cycling--I tighten up the leash and put myself in between him and the other person. He usually remains calm, but you never know what gesture, vocal tone, or even facial expression from the other person will be interpreted as an invitation for him to run to the other person or even jump up to greet them. It's friendly in nature, but they don't necessarily know that. They shouldn't have to flinch, or wonder what is going to happen next. And many people are afraid of dogs.

    The same applies at home as well when we have guests. Goldens tend to be enthusiastic greeters of new people. And they shed. A lot of people like that, others don't. So, again, he is kept under control, or on a leash until he calms down and approaches them in a more polite manner. In extreme cases, he goes into the basement.

    Again, just common courtesy.





    As a runner who isn't that keen on (maybe even afraid of) strange dogs, can I say thank you from the bottom of my heart.
    I live in a rural area, run a lot of footpaths and the amount of people that don't even call their dog to heel astounds me. At least 75% of dog owners round here think it's fine to allow their dog to run up to me, jump at me etc. The other day one stood in the middle of the path playing on his phone while the leashed dog tried to jump at me when I went past, there was plenty of space for him to move to one side and hold dog on side nearer the hedge so I could get past without needing to walk, but he didn't even attempt it.

    And to clarify if a dog is off the lead or doesn't appear to be under 100% control then I will always walk past, nervously at times

    THIS X 100 MILLION THOUSAND!!!!
  • BecomingMyBetterSelfBecomingMyBetterSelf Posts: 14Member Member Posts: 14Member Member
    So my opinion, may be blunt and.. "triggering" but I feel if you can get a certificate online without an actual medical reason(i,e doctor recommended and dog that was specifically trained) then they have no business having a "support" animal. I actually see people online "oh i need an apartment but it wont let me have dogs" and people SUGGeSTING to register their dogs online.. its ridiculous.
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 2,962Member Member Posts: 2,962Member Member
    So my opinion, may be blunt and.. "triggering" but I feel if you can get a certificate online without an actual medical reason(i,e doctor recommended and dog that was specifically trained) then they have no business having a "support" animal. I actually see people online "oh i need an apartment but it wont let me have dogs" and people SUGGeSTING to register their dogs online.. its ridiculous.
    Speaking in relation to the United States:
    Emotional support animals and service animals are two different classes of animal and those differences include differing requirements with regards to what they are or aren't trained to do. Emotional support animals do have a status that is different than your average pet with regards to housing and domestic flights. There is no governmental registry for service animals and I'm pretty sure there isn't for ESAs either.

    I'm not in any way triggered by any of this. I'm just tired of misinformation that could easily be avoided by searching web pages published by the US government.
  • cmriversidecmriverside Posts: 28,669Member Member Posts: 28,669Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    So my opinion, may be blunt and.. "triggering" but I feel if you can get a certificate online without an actual medical reason(i,e doctor recommended and dog that was specifically trained) then they have no business having a "support" animal. I actually see people online "oh i need an apartment but it wont let me have dogs" and people SUGGeSTING to register their dogs online.. its ridiculous.
    Speaking in relation to the United States:
    Emotional support animals and service animals are two different classes of animal and those differences include differing requirements with regards to what they are or aren't trained to do. Emotional support animals do have a status that is different than your average pet with regards to housing and domestic flights. There is no governmental registry for service animals and I'm pretty sure there isn't for ESAs either.

    I'm not in any way triggered by any of this. I'm just tired of misinformation that could easily be avoided by searching web pages published by the US government.

    :lol:

    Good luck getting people to actually use the Google as it's intended.

    Misinformation?

    :lol:

    Have you read the forums??

    I have a whole lot of thoughts about "Service" animals that are actually just pets that people want to bring with them to the zoo, restaurants, grocery and other retail stores etc.

    Give me the Good Old Days when dogs were prohibited by a sign at the door.

    I love dogs as long as they're on a leash and under control. It's stupid humans who are the problem. If the dogs are controlled, no problem. People seem to think everyone should accommodate them at all times.



  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 2,962Member Member Posts: 2,962Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    So my opinion, may be blunt and.. "triggering" but I feel if you can get a certificate online without an actual medical reason(i,e doctor recommended and dog that was specifically trained) then they have no business having a "support" animal. I actually see people online "oh i need an apartment but it wont let me have dogs" and people SUGGeSTING to register their dogs online.. its ridiculous.
    Speaking in relation to the United States:
    Emotional support animals and service animals are two different classes of animal and those differences include differing requirements with regards to what they are or aren't trained to do. Emotional support animals do have a status that is different than your average pet with regards to housing and domestic flights. There is no governmental registry for service animals and I'm pretty sure there isn't for ESAs either.

    I'm not in any way triggered by any of this. I'm just tired of misinformation that could easily be avoided by searching web pages published by the US government.

    :lol:

    Good luck getting people to actually use the Google as it's intended.

    Misinformation?

    :lol:

    Have you read the forums??

    I have a whole lot of thoughts about "Service" animals that are actually just pets that people want to bring with them to the zoo, restaurants, grocery and other retail stores etc.

    Give me the Good Old Days when dogs were prohibited by a sign at the door.

    I love dogs as long as they're on a leash and under control. It's stupid humans who are the problem. If the dogs are controlled, no problem. People seem to think everyone should accommodate them at all times.


    Oh trust me, I've been on the internet for long enough to know that people won't actually do the work. It's sadly not unique to MFP.
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