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Eggs are Bad Again

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  • Khartman6Khartman6 Posts: 27Member Member Posts: 27Member Member
    I changed my diet months ago, to a diet very similar to Keto, I eat 2 deviled eggs every weekday and dippy eggs on the week end. My last blood test all my numbers where spot on. Before this, i had extremely high triglycerides and high cholesterol. I think I'm staying with my eggs....at one time margarine was a healthy alternative to butter.
  • durhammfpdurhammfp Posts: 280Member Member Posts: 280Member Member
    fuzzylop_ wrote: »
    The most interesting finding was the effect seemed to be larger in those of lower bmi vs those of higher.

    I believe https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2728487 is the study referenced.

    I find this interesting too.

    I've been a vegetarian, an omnivarian, a meat-atarian, and (ugh) a vegan (for 12 hangry weeks)...

    The one thing that brought my cholesterol down to a healthy level was getting my weight under control, reducing my BMI from 29+ to ~23. All my health indicators improved, a lot, when I did that.

    I am currently an omnivarian and have decided that I will eat what I want, when I want, including eggs, but it is mostly a plant based diet for me now.

    Of course, YMMV.

    edited January 10
  • rosepatientrosepatient Posts: 3Member, Premium Member Posts: 3Member, Premium Member
    The article stated is shows a correlation, not a causation. And the author of the study herself stated "Eat eggs in moderation." This conclusion agrees with current recommendations.

    We need many well run studies without bias to help up form guidelines on nutrition. Food is inherently complex which makes finding definitive answers difficult!
  • saintor1saintor1 Posts: 282Member Member Posts: 282Member Member
    durhammfp wrote: »
    I am currently an omnivarian and have decided that I will eat what I want, when I want, including eggs, but it is mostly a plant based diet for me now.

    Maybe you are a Pegan without knowing. :smile:
  • whmscllwhmscll Posts: 2,193Member Member Posts: 2,193Member Member
    In 2018 my total cholesterol was 144, well within normal limits. In 2019 I began eating a lot of eggs to get enough protein while losing weight...I probably had 6-10 eggs a week for 8 months, up from 0-3 a week before that. My bloodwork in Oct 2019 showed my cholesterol was over 200. And I weighed 123. The rest of my diet did not change substantially. So while I can’t be positive the issue was eating too many eggs (I am menopausal), I have cut way back (1-2 eggs a month) and will be curious what my cholesterol shows later this year.
    edited January 12
  • muskieschaefmuskieschaef Posts: 22Member Member Posts: 22Member Member
    ❤️ my eggs. I’m not giving them up.
  • minimiss669minimiss669 Posts: 22Member Member Posts: 22Member Member
    Khartman6 wrote: »
    I changed my diet months ago, to a diet very similar to Keto, I eat 2 deviled eggs every weekday and dippy eggs on the week end. My last blood test all my numbers where spot on. Before this, i had extremely high triglycerides and high cholesterol. I think I'm staying with my eggs....at one time margarine was a healthy alternative to butter.

    @Khartman6 you made me chuckle with this comment! In my house, we call them dip dip eggs, but dippy eggs is cute, too.
  • mullanphylanemullanphylane Posts: 53Member Member Posts: 53Member Member
    My cardiologist says an egg/day is just fine. He tends to agree with the studies that conclude that dietary cholesterol has little, if any, effect on blood cholesterol levels.
  • Scotty2HotPieScotty2HotPie Posts: 136Member Member Posts: 136Member Member
    liftingbro wrote: »
    saintor1 wrote: »
    liftingbro wrote: »
    The issue with high cholesterol is usually nothing to do with eating too much cholesterol. Our body produces most of the cholesterol in our system. Many, many studies have been done that show that an increase in cholesterol in the diet doesn't increase cardiovascular disease.

    Really?....From the link in the previous post. Yes the cholesterol & eggs can be bad.

    Question Is consuming dietary cholesterol or eggs associated with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality?

    Findings Among 29 615 adults pooled from 6 prospective cohort studies in the United States with a median follow-up of 17.5 years, each additional 300 mg of dietary cholesterol consumed per day was significantly associated with higher risk of incident CVD (adjusted hazard ratio
    , 1.17; adjusted absolute risk difference [ARD], 3.24%) and all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 1.18; adjusted ARD, 4.43%), and each additional half an egg consumed per day was significantly associated with higher risk of incident CVD (adjusted HR, 1.06; adjusted ARD, 1.11%) and all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 1.08; adjusted ARD, 1.93%).

    Meaning Among US adults, higher consumption of dietary cholesterol or eggs was significantly associated with higher risk of incident CVD and all-cause mortality in a dose-response manner.


    These are from several studies that are population studies meaning they basically asked people if they eat eggs and then checked back with them 17 years later and asked if they had a heart attack or died or had CVD. There is a major issue in this logic, in that it's not taking into account the person's overall lifestyle and what the rest of their diet is or their genetic disposition.

    You could probably ask the same number of people if they eat fruit and check back with them 17 years later and they'd probably find a significant portion of those people have diabetes. That doesn't mean fruit was the cause.

    All this means is that it is something to study further and fortunately when studied further it was found that dietary cholesterol has little affect on CVD rates. They found out that your body/genetics is more the problem. Dietary cholesterol can be problematic if you over eat in general and eat far too many carbs (which is what triggers the body to produce cholesterol). My point is, if you are exercising and eating reasonably eating eggs everyday will make zero difference.

    An anecdotal example, for generations and generations of farmers where I grew up they eat sausage and eggs for breakfast every day. The farmers here have very little in the way of heart issues compared to other folks. Why? Most likely because they didn't over eat and were very active. Most of the dietary cholesterol will get burn out of the blood stream if you're active before it can be stored elsewhere.

    So agree with you here... Most of these "Studies" are completely uncontrolled and absolute garbage. Mostly ignoring other dietary and activity choices. And yet, the USDA and the ADA continues to use them as gospel and forcing doctors to make dietary recommendations on these fallacies. Despite the fact that people vary widely in how they respond to different foods.

    And when any Doctor pushes back, they risk getting their license pulled.

    So the first impulse for Doctors is to recommend stop eating meat and prescribe statins and other meds to lower "cholesterol" when there's a perceived issue and many of these people ending up taking them for rest of their lives...

    And what's worse is that it seems that people are more dogmatic in their diets than religion now. I swear there's going to be a Vegan vs Meat Eater war on the horizon one day...
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 21,530Member Member Posts: 21,530Member Member
    liftingbro wrote: »
    saintor1 wrote: »
    liftingbro wrote: »
    The issue with high cholesterol is usually nothing to do with eating too much cholesterol. Our body produces most of the cholesterol in our system. Many, many studies have been done that show that an increase in cholesterol in the diet doesn't increase cardiovascular disease.

    Really?....From the link in the previous post. Yes the cholesterol & eggs can be bad.

    Question Is consuming dietary cholesterol or eggs associated with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality?

    Findings Among 29 615 adults pooled from 6 prospective cohort studies in the United States with a median follow-up of 17.5 years, each additional 300 mg of dietary cholesterol consumed per day was significantly associated with higher risk of incident CVD (adjusted hazard ratio
    , 1.17; adjusted absolute risk difference [ARD], 3.24%) and all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 1.18; adjusted ARD, 4.43%), and each additional half an egg consumed per day was significantly associated with higher risk of incident CVD (adjusted HR, 1.06; adjusted ARD, 1.11%) and all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 1.08; adjusted ARD, 1.93%).

    Meaning Among US adults, higher consumption of dietary cholesterol or eggs was significantly associated with higher risk of incident CVD and all-cause mortality in a dose-response manner.


    These are from several studies that are population studies meaning they basically asked people if they eat eggs and then checked back with them 17 years later and asked if they had a heart attack or died or had CVD. There is a major issue in this logic, in that it's not taking into account the person's overall lifestyle and what the rest of their diet is or their genetic disposition.

    You could probably ask the same number of people if they eat fruit and check back with them 17 years later and they'd probably find a significant portion of those people have diabetes. That doesn't mean fruit was the cause.

    All this means is that it is something to study further and fortunately when studied further it was found that dietary cholesterol has little affect on CVD rates. They found out that your body/genetics is more the problem. Dietary cholesterol can be problematic if you over eat in general and eat far too many carbs (which is what triggers the body to produce cholesterol). My point is, if you are exercising and eating reasonably eating eggs everyday will make zero difference.

    An anecdotal example, for generations and generations of farmers where I grew up they eat sausage and eggs for breakfast every day. The farmers here have very little in the way of heart issues compared to other folks. Why? Most likely because they didn't over eat and were very active. Most of the dietary cholesterol will get burn out of the blood stream if you're active before it can be stored elsewhere.

    So agree with you here... Most of these "Studies" are completely uncontrolled and absolute garbage. Mostly ignoring other dietary and activity choices. And yet, the USDA and the ADA continues to use them as gospel and forcing doctors to make dietary recommendations on these fallacies. Despite the fact that people vary widely in how they respond to different foods.

    And when any Doctor pushes back, they risk getting their license pulled.

    So the first impulse for Doctors is to recommend stop eating meat and prescribe statins and other meds to lower "cholesterol" when there's a perceived issue and many of these people ending up taking them for rest of their lives...

    And what's worse is that it seems that people are more dogmatic in their diets than religion now. I swear there's going to be a Vegan vs Meat Eater war on the horizon one day...

    Is there an example of a doctor getting their license to practice medicine revoked due to their recommendation of a specific diet?
  • The_Usual_SuspectsThe_Usual_Suspects Posts: 22Member Member Posts: 22Member Member
    Let's not forget that in the not-so-distant past, fats were supposedly bad. Doctors are idiots. Keep shoveling eggs down your gullet, my friends. Yolks and all.
  • bearly63bearly63 Posts: 242Member, Premium Member Posts: 242Member, Premium Member
    oh1n9hpcvi1l.png
    Easter is coming....maybe these eggs are a better choice lol!
  • The_Usual_SuspectsThe_Usual_Suspects Posts: 22Member Member Posts: 22Member Member
    Let's not forget that in the not-so-distant past, fats were supposedly bad. "Professionals" are idiots. Keep shoveling eggs down your gullet, my friends. Yolks and all.

    Doctors are not idiots. The issue is they only get a few days worth of education in nutrition and weight management in med school. Which is why registered dieticians are professionals in that field. ;)

    I fixed it
  • Scotty2HotPieScotty2HotPie Posts: 136Member Member Posts: 136Member Member
    liftingbro wrote: »
    saintor1 wrote: »
    liftingbro wrote: »
    The issue with high cholesterol is usually nothing to do with eating too much cholesterol. Our body produces most of the cholesterol in our system. Many, many studies have been done that show that an increase in cholesterol in the diet doesn't increase cardiovascular disease.

    Really?....From the link in the previous post. Yes the cholesterol & eggs can be bad.

    Question Is consuming dietary cholesterol or eggs associated with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality?

    Findings Among 29 615 adults pooled from 6 prospective cohort studies in the United States with a median follow-up of 17.5 years, each additional 300 mg of dietary cholesterol consumed per day was significantly associated with higher risk of incident CVD (adjusted hazard ratio
    , 1.17; adjusted absolute risk difference [ARD], 3.24%) and all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 1.18; adjusted ARD, 4.43%), and each additional half an egg consumed per day was significantly associated with higher risk of incident CVD (adjusted HR, 1.06; adjusted ARD, 1.11%) and all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 1.08; adjusted ARD, 1.93%).

    Meaning Among US adults, higher consumption of dietary cholesterol or eggs was significantly associated with higher risk of incident CVD and all-cause mortality in a dose-response manner.


    These are from several studies that are population studies meaning they basically asked people if they eat eggs and then checked back with them 17 years later and asked if they had a heart attack or died or had CVD. There is a major issue in this logic, in that it's not taking into account the person's overall lifestyle and what the rest of their diet is or their genetic disposition.

    You could probably ask the same number of people if they eat fruit and check back with them 17 years later and they'd probably find a significant portion of those people have diabetes. That doesn't mean fruit was the cause.

    All this means is that it is something to study further and fortunately when studied further it was found that dietary cholesterol has little affect on CVD rates. They found out that your body/genetics is more the problem. Dietary cholesterol can be problematic if you over eat in general and eat far too many carbs (which is what triggers the body to produce cholesterol). My point is, if you are exercising and eating reasonably eating eggs everyday will make zero difference.

    An anecdotal example, for generations and generations of farmers where I grew up they eat sausage and eggs for breakfast every day. The farmers here have very little in the way of heart issues compared to other folks. Why? Most likely because they didn't over eat and were very active. Most of the dietary cholesterol will get burn out of the blood stream if you're active before it can be stored elsewhere.

    So agree with you here... Most of these "Studies" are completely uncontrolled and absolute garbage. Mostly ignoring other dietary and activity choices. And yet, the USDA and the ADA continues to use them as gospel and forcing doctors to make dietary recommendations on these fallacies. Despite the fact that people vary widely in how they respond to different foods.

    And when any Doctor pushes back, they risk getting their license pulled.

    So the first impulse for Doctors is to recommend stop eating meat and prescribe statins and other meds to lower "cholesterol" when there's a perceived issue and many of these people ending up taking them for rest of their lives...

    And what's worse is that it seems that people are more dogmatic in their diets than religion now. I swear there's going to be a Vegan vs Meat Eater war on the horizon one day...

    Is there an example of a doctor getting their license to practice medicine revoked due to their recommendation of a specific diet?

    Yes.. can't remember his name. But a Doctor in Australia was censored and forbidden to recommend a low carb/high fat diet.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,501Member Member Posts: 4,501Member Member
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 21,530Member Member Posts: 21,530Member Member
    liftingbro wrote: »
    saintor1 wrote: »
    liftingbro wrote: »
    The issue with high cholesterol is usually nothing to do with eating too much cholesterol. Our body produces most of the cholesterol in our system. Many, many studies have been done that show that an increase in cholesterol in the diet doesn't increase cardiovascular disease.

    Really?....From the link in the previous post. Yes the cholesterol & eggs can be bad.

    Question Is consuming dietary cholesterol or eggs associated with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality?

    Findings Among 29 615 adults pooled from 6 prospective cohort studies in the United States with a median follow-up of 17.5 years, each additional 300 mg of dietary cholesterol consumed per day was significantly associated with higher risk of incident CVD (adjusted hazard ratio
    , 1.17; adjusted absolute risk difference [ARD], 3.24%) and all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 1.18; adjusted ARD, 4.43%), and each additional half an egg consumed per day was significantly associated with higher risk of incident CVD (adjusted HR, 1.06; adjusted ARD, 1.11%) and all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 1.08; adjusted ARD, 1.93%).

    Meaning Among US adults, higher consumption of dietary cholesterol or eggs was significantly associated with higher risk of incident CVD and all-cause mortality in a dose-response manner.


    These are from several studies that are population studies meaning they basically asked people if they eat eggs and then checked back with them 17 years later and asked if they had a heart attack or died or had CVD. There is a major issue in this logic, in that it's not taking into account the person's overall lifestyle and what the rest of their diet is or their genetic disposition.

    You could probably ask the same number of people if they eat fruit and check back with them 17 years later and they'd probably find a significant portion of those people have diabetes. That doesn't mean fruit was the cause.

    All this means is that it is something to study further and fortunately when studied further it was found that dietary cholesterol has little affect on CVD rates. They found out that your body/genetics is more the problem. Dietary cholesterol can be problematic if you over eat in general and eat far too many carbs (which is what triggers the body to produce cholesterol). My point is, if you are exercising and eating reasonably eating eggs everyday will make zero difference.

    An anecdotal example, for generations and generations of farmers where I grew up they eat sausage and eggs for breakfast every day. The farmers here have very little in the way of heart issues compared to other folks. Why? Most likely because they didn't over eat and were very active. Most of the dietary cholesterol will get burn out of the blood stream if you're active before it can be stored elsewhere.

    So agree with you here... Most of these "Studies" are completely uncontrolled and absolute garbage. Mostly ignoring other dietary and activity choices. And yet, the USDA and the ADA continues to use them as gospel and forcing doctors to make dietary recommendations on these fallacies. Despite the fact that people vary widely in how they respond to different foods.

    And when any Doctor pushes back, they risk getting their license pulled.

    So the first impulse for Doctors is to recommend stop eating meat and prescribe statins and other meds to lower "cholesterol" when there's a perceived issue and many of these people ending up taking them for rest of their lives...

    And what's worse is that it seems that people are more dogmatic in their diets than religion now. I swear there's going to be a Vegan vs Meat Eater war on the horizon one day...

    Is there an example of a doctor getting their license to practice medicine revoked due to their recommendation of a specific diet?

    Yes.. can't remember his name. But a Doctor in Australia was censored and forbidden to recommend a low carb/high fat diet.

    If you're talking about Gary Fettke, he was a surgeon with no training in nutrition or diabetes (what he was giving advice on) and he never lost his license. He was asked for two years to stop giving nutritional advice, but the decision was then reversed.

    So the answer to your question is "No." You have no example of a doctor getting their license to practice medicine revoked due to their recommendation of a specific diet.
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