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How to deal with joint pain?

B_Plus_EffortB_Plus_Effort Member Posts: 265 Member Member Posts: 265 Member
So a little background first. I used to run regularly about 3 miles 5 days a week sometimes up to 5 miles if I felt good. Then when I turned 45 it was as if someone flipped a switch and my knees gave out, my right knee felt as if it was held on by a rubber band and was going to snap off any minute. I did the rest for a day, try to run, nope hurt like hewk, ok, rest a week, try again, nope, ok rest a month try again nope, darn it rest a year try to run, nope can't even run a mile any more. (I did find alternative exercises like swimming mostly to get me by) then I went through a period where both my knees and my elbows hurt. Hence the question on what could be causing this and what can I do to combat it. I am 48 now love to swim but would love to run again. I am a 5' 11" male and weigh about 195 now but when I run I am 185 and consider myself in shape otherwise. I'm and IT guy so I sit at a desk during the day and it's not like it's wear and tear from hard labor, that's why this is puzzling to me. I just feel like it happened too early for me, I would be willing to accept it more if my body fell apart like this when I was 55 but not 45 especially so all of a sudden. Sorry for the long post, can anybody relate, any advice, please and thank you

California Greg
edited October 11
«13

Replies

  • AliNouveauAliNouveau Member Posts: 36,288 Member Member Posts: 36,288 Member
    Have you been to a dr to rule out any medical issues?

    My joints often hurt and I think it's because I just go too hard too fast. Ok I've been told that is my problem.

    What about walking? I've found walking is much more gentle on my knees.
  • MaltedTeaMaltedTea Member, Premium Posts: 3,414 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,414 Member
    I'm with @AliNouveau; check in with your healthcare team.

    Ask specifically whether a rehabilitation specialist (like a physiotherapist, sports therapist, and/or occupational therapist) can be helpful to you and your long-term goals. Regardless of the answer, I hope your doc can help you continue along your fitness path.

    Keep it up 🙌🏿
  • B_Plus_EffortB_Plus_Effort Member Posts: 265 Member Member Posts: 265 Member
    AliNouveau wrote: »
    Have you been to a dr to rule out any medical issues?

    yes I have seen a doctor who told me one thing (I really like him he's been my physician for many years, so he just jokes what are you doing when it hurts, and I say running, and he says STOP running, ha ha) and sent me to a physical therapy specialist and she told me something else, ha ha typical doctor difference of opinion, they basically said strengthen your leg muscles, well that's a catch 22 you see for example I can't do squats or lunges yet I need to do those to get stronger. I have found that rest just adequate rest is best, but the Go Guy inside me wants to do stuff (I think you can relate, ha ha) I also like to ride a stationary bike so I do that for like an hour a day, so low impact stuff
    AliNouveau wrote: »
    What about walking? I've found walking is much more gentle on my knees.

    Yes I do walk the same distances as I used to run so 3 miles or sometimes 5 miles or I hike with my daughter, I love to walk and just listen to music.

    thank you for replying
    edited October 11
  • AliNouveauAliNouveau Member Posts: 36,288 Member Member Posts: 36,288 Member
    muszyngr wrote: »
    AliNouveau wrote: »
    Have you been to a dr to rule out any medical issues?

    yes I have seen a doctor who told me one thing (I really like him he's been my physician for many years, so he just jokes what are you doing when it hurts, and I say running, and he says STOP running, ha ha) and sent me to a physical therapy specialist and she told me something else, ha ha typical doctor difference of opinion, they basically said strengthen your leg muscles, well that's a catch 22 you see for example I can't do squats or lunges yet I need to do those to get stronger. I have found that rest just adequate rest is best, but the Go Guy inside me wants to do stuff (I think you can relate, ha ha) I also like to ride a stationary bike so I do that for like an hour a day, so low impact stuff
    AliNouveau wrote: »
    What about walking? I've found walking is much more gentle on my knees.

    Yes I do walk the same distances as I used to run so 3 miles or sometimes 5 miles or I hike with my daughter, I love to walk and just listen to music.

    thank you for replying

    I completely get this! I found lately I can't to side lunges because my knee will hurt then give out. I do squats and between the weird crackle sounds it hurts so I totally get where you're coming from. Also the go go go, I have to walk at least 5km and walk quickly or add hills to make my mind think I've done a worthwhile workout.

    I suspect it's just aging. I did notice that doing some stretches for hips flexors oddly helped a lot of my joint stiffness in my lower body. Maybe the soreness is from just being tight? Worth a try perhaps

    Perhaps maybe you've have injuries too that just haven't healed? have you tried wrapping your knees or getting like a knee sleeve?
  • globalc00globalc00 Member Posts: 83 Member Member Posts: 83 Member
    I had similar thing happen. Except it happened when I was only 41. I was jogging for an hour on a treadmill every other day. But shortly after turning 41, knee pain started and could no longer run. Resting didn’t help. So I had to give up running. Now I think besides the possibility of knee pain if I try to run, I also have mental block telling me I’m too old to do try running. 🤦‍♂️
  • snowflake954snowflake954 Member Posts: 5,553 Member Member Posts: 5,553 Member
    I'm 65, but have had OA for a very long time. I have a stretching, yoga, aerobic routine that I do 3 mornings a week before I go to the gym or pool. Everyone has to find their own way, but yoga and stretching can do wonders. Good luck.
  • sgt1372sgt1372 Member Posts: 3,734 Member Member Posts: 3,734 Member
    I know a lot of ppl love running but I'm not one of them.

    Besides my asthma, I always disliked it because it is a high impact exercise which I found uncomfortable and jarring on my knees and ankles (regardless of the type/quality of the shoes I wore doing it).

    Lots of other low impact cardio exercises that you can do instead.

    My choices are rowing, walking and hiking but biking and swimming, among others, are also things that you can do to still get a cardio workout w/o the same risk of joint pain and injury wc seems so much more common among runners.

    edited October 11
  • psychod787psychod787 Member, Premium Posts: 3,862 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,862 Member
    use a roach clip? no,not really. see your ortho.... could be something else going on.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,675 Member Member Posts: 8,675 Member
    Proper load management and strength training helps joints immensely.

    Yeah unfortunately doctors don't with know or follow current evidence on the benefits of strength training. Some of it's ego and not wanting to admit they don't know how to training. Then there are ones who at least refer some form of resistance training.

    I'm 100% with your physical therapist from the info you gave.

    Btw my doctor told me same thing about a decade ago. Ended up in a wheel chair until I strengthened my muscles to help with joints and increased density in my bones.
    edited October 11
  • corinasue1143corinasue1143 Member Posts: 4,206 Member Member Posts: 4,206 Member
    So, what was the diagnosis? Was it the actual joint or was/is it tendons or meniscus or....?

    When I had PT for my knee he prescribed a whole bunch of PT exercises, none of which were squats or lunges.

    Biking or swimming are still good for me.

    Also, an anti-inflammatory diet is really helpful for my pain level.

    Agreed!
    Exercises for knees can start much gentler than squats or lunges on knee joints, more about muscles around the knee.
    And if it’s the beginning of arthritis, an anti-inflammatory diet may help. It really helped me a lot.
  • naturegirldebbienaturegirldebbie Member Posts: 10 Member Member Posts: 10 Member
    I used to have knee pain so bad I could not get down steps. My doctor said it was caused by the muscles around the knee cap that allows the cap to move. He recommended I get ankle weights that come with a set of slim 1 pound bars that you can add or remove for additional weight. Start with no weights at first, then every week add 2 1 pound bars to each of the nylon anklets.

    Lay flat

    Bend one knee and keep that foot flat on floor or bed

    Keep the other leg straight out with toe pointing towards ceiling

    Lift the straight leg about 10" off the floor or bed and hold 10 seconds.

    Do 20 of these per leg (set)

    Do 3 sets per leg alternately.

    I just started also using a supplement called Smarter Curcumin that has taken away a lot of back pain caused by several herniated disks that also helps with the knee pain.
    edited October 12
  • happyness4mehappyness4me Member Posts: 9 Member Member Posts: 9 Member
    Did you get a diagnosis? Unfortunately some people can develop arthritis at a young age. Some forms can be autoimmune (RA or PA) and can require medication. I'm only 36 and have it in multiple joints.
  • B_Plus_EffortB_Plus_Effort Member Posts: 265 Member Member Posts: 265 Member
    So, what was the diagnosis?

    So for my left elbow the diagnosis was something called a Golfers Elbow. Now we all heard of Tennis Elbow well this is the opposite. Golfers Elbow is when the inside of your elbow joint hurts. The ironic thing is that I never played golf in my life (well maybe miniature golf once or twice, ha ha)

    so far the only thing that seems to work is rest, which as all of you might know for us doers is very very difficult to do, since we are like sharks, no? always have to be moving

    thank you so much for offering to help I really really appreciate it (all of you)
  • B_Plus_EffortB_Plus_Effort Member Posts: 265 Member Member Posts: 265 Member
    sgt1372 wrote: »
    I know a lot of ppl love running but I'm not one of them.

    Besides my asthma, I always disliked it because it is a high impact exercise which I found uncomfortable and jarring on my knees and ankles (regardless of the type/quality of the shoes I wore doing it).

    Lots of other low impact cardio exercises that you can do instead.

    My choices are rowing, walking and hiking but biking and swimming, among others, are also things that you can do to still get a cardio workout w/o the same risk of joint pain and injury wc seems so much more common among runners.

    ha ha, I totally agree, some people hate running on a treadmill I can do it all day, I prefer it over the hard ground because living in a city we need to run on the street or sidewalk, the treadmill gives a bit so it's a bit easier on the joints, anyway and I love rowing and started doing it, but being an idiot and using wrong form, that's how I jacked up my left elbow, repetitive motion but I was pulling the darn bar to my upper chest/neck, don't ask me why, maybe thinking it was maximizing my range of motion, now I am not a total Buffoon in the weight room, I played high school sports took a weight class in college, worked with a personal trainer as an adult, but sometimes you just do stupid things

    thank you for your suggestions
    edited October 14
  • B_Plus_EffortB_Plus_Effort Member Posts: 265 Member Member Posts: 265 Member
    Also, an anti-inflammatory diet is really helpful for my pain level.

    Talk to me Goose? I am all for getting my nutrients and vitamins from real food, but someone on Instagram (in great shape and older than me 48+) recommended Turmeric so I picked up a random bottle of it at my grocery store and am giving that a shot, it's been a couple weeks now and I don't think it's doing squat, ha ha

    9vxj412k83hx.jpg
    edited October 14
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,675 Member Member Posts: 8,675 Member
    muszyngr wrote: »
    So, what was the diagnosis?

    So for my left elbow the diagnosis was something called a Golfers Elbow. Now we all heard of Tennis Elbow well this is the opposite. Golfers Elbow is when the inside of your elbow joint hurts. The ironic thing is that I never played golf in my life (well maybe miniature golf once or twice, ha ha)

    so far the only thing that seems to work is rest, which as all of you might know for us doers is very very difficult to do, since we are like sharks, no? always have to be moving

    thank you so much for offering to help I really really appreciate it (all of you)

    Golfer's elbow is just medical slang as golfer's might experience it though I've noticed lifters who do excessive curls or chin ups might experience it as well.

    Since it's more than likely inflammation of the tendon that is noticed, proper load management is better than plain rest. You want to increase the blood flow to heal since tendons are more restrictive than muscles.

    In this case I usually lower the external load and see how you respond.

    Next would be ROM of the movement that is affected.

    Lastly exercise selection with specificity to movement.

    I've had great success with this style management for medial epicondylitis.

    Practice proper load management and this will go away.

    edited October 14
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 22,772 Member Member Posts: 22,772 Member
    muszyngr wrote: »
    AliNouveau wrote: »
    Have you been to a dr to rule out any medical issues?

    yes I have seen a doctor who told me one thing (I really like him he's been my physician for many years, so he just jokes what are you doing when it hurts, and I say running, and he says STOP running, ha ha) and sent me to a physical therapy specialist and she told me something else, ha ha typical doctor difference of opinion, they basically said strengthen your leg muscles, well that's a catch 22 you see for example I can't do squats or lunges yet I need to do those to get stronger. I have found that rest just adequate rest is best, but the Go Guy inside me wants to do stuff (I think you can relate, ha ha) I also like to ride a stationary bike so I do that for like an hour a day, so low impact stuff
    AliNouveau wrote: »
    What about walking? I've found walking is much more gentle on my knees.

    Yes I do walk the same distances as I used to run so 3 miles or sometimes 5 miles or I hike with my daughter, I love to walk and just listen to music.

    thank you for replying

    My PT for my knee has never included squats or lunges. Here are SOME of the exercises I was given:

    0q41jk1g5c15.jpg

    I found cold laser therapy VERY helpful for my golder's elbow (also not a golfer) but my PT no longer has slots for patients other than those who are post surgery.

    I've asked for recommendations for a device I can use at home here:

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10812770/recommendations-for-cold-laser-therapy-device-to-use-at-home-golfers-elbow#latest
  • cgvet37cgvet37 Member Posts: 1,185 Member Member Posts: 1,185 Member
    Turmeric with black pepper extract.
  • B_Plus_EffortB_Plus_Effort Member Posts: 265 Member Member Posts: 265 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    muszyngr wrote: »
    So, what was the diagnosis?

    So for my left elbow the diagnosis was something called a Golfers Elbow. Now we all heard of Tennis Elbow well this is the opposite. Golfers Elbow is when the inside of your elbow joint hurts. The ironic thing is that I never played golf in my life (well maybe miniature golf once or twice, ha ha)

    so far the only thing that seems to work is rest, which as all of you might know for us doers is very very difficult to do, since we are like sharks, no? always have to be moving

    thank you so much for offering to help I really really appreciate it (all of you)

    Golfer's elbow is just medical slang as golfer's might experience it though I've noticed lifters who do excessive curls or chin ups might experience it as well.

    Since it's more than likely inflammation of the tendon that is noticed, proper load management is better than plain rest. You want to increase the blood flow to heal since tendons are more restrictive than muscles.

    In this case I usually lower the external load and see how you respond.

    Next would be ROM of the movement that is affected.

    Lastly exercise selection with specificity to movement.

    I've had great success with this style management for medial epicondylitis.

    Practice proper load management and this will go away.

    thank you, I'm not sure I understand what is meant by "load management" does that mean watch how much you lift? I ask because I know I have a problem so I lift really light

    the day before the pain started I did 5 sets of dumbbell bicep curls of 10 reps each (but I built up to this over time doing some every other day or so, nothing crazy)

    10 x 15 lbs in each hand (so light)
    10 x 15 lbs in each hand (so light)
    10 x 15 lbs in each hand (so light)

    that felt easy so I switched to the 20 pounders for the last two sets

    10 x 20 lbs in each hand
    10 x 20 lbs in each hand

    I did the same for standing above the head tricep extensions
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