Faith in people and machines

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Replies

  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,456 Member
    globalc00 wrote: »

    How many grams in a "slice" of bread? How many grams in any given bun/roll? USDA database thinks a regular bun is 56 g on average, a slider bun in 28 g, and a "roll" is 48 g. Meanwhile, it thinks a "slice" of white bread is 139 g.

    Maybe i'm calculating my bread wrong. I was under the assumption that you add up all your ingridient calories and divide it by your final product. 25g of my bread is 71 calories.
    ingridents are
    381 g White Bread Flour
    9 g olive oil
    33 g unsalted butter
    9 g sugar
    6 g salt
    4 g yeast
    20 g milk powder.
    makes a 1.5 loaf bread which comesout to be 576g.

    Well, for starters, 1.5 lbs is 680 g, not 576. Do you mean it's a recipe for a 1.5 lb, but you only get 576 g?

    That aside, 71 calories for a 25 g slice of bread seems reasonable, and your method for calculating the calories in your bread, as I understand it (add up calories in all ingredients, weigh final cooked product, and distribute the total calories across some designated serving size), is the right way to go about it.

    But my point is that it's meaningless to compare "a slice" to "a roll" without knowing the weights of both.
  • globalc00
    globalc00 Posts: 103 Member
    The point is if 1 slice of 25 gram bread is 71 calories, its shocking that people can make hamburger buns that are 80 calories for top and bottom piece.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 25,278 Member
    dewit wrote: »
    @AnnPT77 , I always love your posts! 💐 Now, by throwing in the law of large numbers, you have my eternal admiration 🌻.

    Thanks!

    In literal terms, they're probably only semi-large numbers**, but the principle still applies. 😉

    ** . . . although, when one's been doing this for 5+ years like I have . . . ! 😆

  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,456 Member
    globalc00 wrote: »
    The point is if 1 slice of 25 gram bread is 71 calories, its shocking that people can make hamburger buns that are 80 calories for top and bottom piece.

    It wouldn't shock me if the Five Guys buns are only 80 cals. They're so thin and flimsy they dissolve on contact with a little burger grease, much less condiments.

    Yeah, I said it. Take your best shot, Five Guys fans.
  • springlering62
    springlering62 Posts: 5,265 Member
    We can make ourselves barking crazy over this stuff. I have days (today) where my little fingers will seize up in indecision over entering 1 tsp versus 1.33 of honey crystals on my evening pudding. That’s 5 calories difference!

    It’s good you’re paying attention and thinking about this stuff. It was failure to do so that got us in this shared boat in the first place.

    Healthy Life makes a terrific line of low cal breads. I particularly like them because the ingredients are “normal” and don’t include cellulose or HFCs. 35 calories a slice, makes great sandwiches, French toast, grilled cheese or regular toast.

    In all honesty, when It comes down to it, it’s just regular commercial bread sliced way thinner. Their hamburger buns are slightly smaller than standard and very fluffy.

    That’s perfectly fine with me. They do the intended job and taste great.

    I will be making a loaf of homemade bread for dinner. Mine calls for 500gr flour, salt, yeast and water. I’ve been fascinated by the variation in weight for the completed loaf. Anywhere from 701gr to 770’ish. Strangely, it was the loaf that didn’t rise properly and was very dense that was the lightest.

    I’m wondering if the weight doesn’t drop more as it cools and releases steam. (As if it would ever last that long!)

    So many questions about everything. But curiosity is what makes life interesting, even if it is about the piddly stuff.

    Today I continue my experiment with instant clear gel. I’m determined to make a sugar free pudding that doesn’t taste bitter, like the boxed stuff has started to.
  • Redordeadhead
    Redordeadhead Posts: 1,192 Member
    globalc00 wrote: »
    The point is if 1 slice of 25 gram bread is 71 calories, its shocking that people can make hamburger buns that are 80 calories for top and bottom piece.

    How is it shocking? Did you see my post!? Hundreds of brands have hamburger buns for 80-90 calories and slices of bread for 35-50 calories. You use butter, milk powder, oil, sugar which are high calories. None of these breads that are lower contain any of that or they use lower calorie replacements.

    Exactly, and a lot of hamburger buns don't weigh very much, as explained.
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,456 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    globalc00 wrote: »
    It just seems like a lot of the "i'm not losing weight post" nobody bring up the fact that if they are eating out, their calorie count probably isn't what they think it is. People usually say, it takes time, fluxuation or the it's not linear.

    If one is overestimating exercise and underestimating calories, and most people want variety in the days.... then the question of how much deficit if you are indeed in one can wildly vary.
    I would say it also depends on the context. If I rarely eat at a restaurant or get take out, let's say once a month (which is pretty accurate right now), then the fact that the calories in that one restaurant meal might not be 100% correct is not the most relevant factor in why I'm not losing weight. If, however, I ate out 4 times a week, it would be a good question to ask.

    I've read many threads on these forums in which the inaccuracy of calories in food prepared outside has actually been mentioned, so it is discussed sometimes.

    In every thread I've ever seen where the OP says they aren't losing as expected and eat out a lot, someone, usually many someones, points to the eating out as a likely culprit.

    Especially when the OP in question doesn't bother logging meals out because it's "impossible," or logs random user-created entries that they make no attempt to verify, or makes an attempt at deconstructing the meal that looks woefully underestimated on amounts for main ingredients and makes no allowances for added fats.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,893 Member
    globalc00 wrote: »
    The point is if 1 slice of 25 gram bread is 71 calories, its shocking that people can make hamburger buns that are 80 calories for top and bottom piece.

    How is it shocking? Did you see my post!? Hundreds of brands have hamburger buns for 80-90 calories and slices of bread for 35-50 calories. You use butter, milk powder, oil, sugar which are high calories. None of these breads that are lower contain any of that or they use lower calorie replacements.
    globalc00 wrote: »
    The point is if 1 slice of 25 gram bread is 71 calories, its shocking that people can make hamburger buns that are 80 calories for top and bottom piece.

    How is it shocking? Did you see my post!? Hundreds of brands have hamburger buns for 80-90 calories and slices of bread for 35-50 calories. You use butter, milk powder, oil, sugar which are high calories. None of these breads that are lower contain any of that or they use lower calorie replacements.

    Exactly, and a lot of hamburger buns don't weigh very much, as explained.

    This and this. Breads vary a lot by density. When I make homemade bread (which I don't really do anymore, but I used to), it was typically denser than any low cal storebought bread. That's what Lynn was getting at with the question about weight too -- the weights of different bread items are going to vary a lot, depending both on the volume and how dense they are.

    If I'm making a homemade burger, the bun isn't important to me, so I usually get a low cal one. Never stopped me from losing and I have no reason to think the cals are wrong.

    Also, you said your bread was about as basic as can be, but the most basic bread is really just flour, water, and yeast. Lots of bread recipes are similar, see: https://bakerbettie.com/four-ingredient-no-kneadbread/
  • panda4153
    panda4153 Posts: 417 Member
    zamphir66 wrote: »
    globalc00 wrote: »
    We all know CICO is key to everyone’s weight loss goal. I often hear people say scale that show body fat are inaccurate. And fitness machine like treadmill or activity tracker over estimate calories burned.

    But it seems like people tend to believe the calories in their food that the restaurant puts up. The portions are cut by machines and cooked by different cook every day. The amount of oil used or how big of a scoop of sides you got all varies.

    Why would you believe one but not the other?

    In every restaurant I've worked at, and I've worked at a few, the portions and quantities of everything are scientifically controlled and managed. Frozen burger patties are the same size. Buns are all the same size. You're trained to put X pickles on something, no more no less. Condiment squirts are precision controlled. It's not just any old bottle of something, it's designed to be precise. Restaurant managers, as much as anything, are making sure no one in the back goes "cowboy" and puts 3.5 scoops of cheese on a pizza when it's only supposed to be 3. All of this is for revenue purposes. And as a consequence, for any reasonably successful franchise restaurant, you can indeed trust their calorie counts to within a reasonably small margin of error.

    I came here to say this. Restaurants operate on a very slim profit margin. Food costs are calculated abs watched very closely against what actually gets used/sold. Restaurants are way more accurate then people think.
  • Jacq_qui
    Jacq_qui Posts: 363 Member
    globalc00 wrote: »
    I know there are buns out there that claim 80 calories. However I bought a breadmaker to make my own bread, and using as basic ingridents as possible to make bread, 80 calories would be essentially 1 slice of bread.

    I make my own bread. A 'slice of bread' is as big as you cut it!