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Anyone doing The Galveston Diet?

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  • 33gail3333gail33 Member Posts: 998 Member Member Posts: 998 Member
    kingscrown wrote: »
    @33gail33 It is about doing an intermittent Fast, cutting sugar, increasing fiber (veggies). It's really a good livable plan. Not expensive. No re-ocurring fee. So way cheaper than any plan I've ever tried over the years. Its also for menopausal women. So I'm not sure what all the mansplaining about menopausal women's bodies is in this thread. Not sure why they're here, but it's a diet that really would be healthy and affordable for you too. Welcome.

    Yeah I am not getting where people said it was expensive - the link I saw it was a one time $60 fee. (I was working with a nutritionist and it was a hell off a lot more expensive than $60.) It honestly sounds exactly like what I was doing, basically whole food low sugar. And sure you can do it on your own without a plan, but some people (myself included) due better with "rules" and/or guidance to follow. Good luck and keep up posted.
    edited June 17
  • 33gail3333gail33 Member Posts: 998 Member Member Posts: 998 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Unless it's a diet you'll do forever, there's really no point in attempting it. Especially if it's really restrictive. Because the chances are high (over 90%) that weight regain will happen once you abandon it. Find a SUSTAINABLE way of eating that you won't regret or rue.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    But isn't that what all of us are trying to find though? A way of eating that we can do forever? How would we know until we attempt it?
    I mean for me obviously the way I am eating now isn't working for me, so sticking with it doesn't seem like the answer, I need to make a change. If one finds a way of eating that helps them achieve their goal weight and be and feel healthier why wouldn't they want to stick with it forever?
  • 33gail3333gail33 Member Posts: 998 Member Member Posts: 998 Member
    I actually am loosening up my belief that what you need to do, you need to do forever.

    I think you have to be prepared with an exit strategy, and to be prepared for some regain of at least water weight, and I don't think VLCD are a good idea unless your doctor puts you on one and is supervising it (this is sometimes necessary when weight is more dangerous than the very low calories), but.

    I think sometimes a week or two of going hard can be a good idea. Not forever but especially when there's not a lot to lose. I'm vaguely considering a similar thing now that I'm down to 10lbs from ideal. We'll see where I am in the fall but 2 weeks of restricting down to 1400ish calories (which no I could not maintain - that's a pretty big deficit for me) followed by 2 weeks maintaining might be a less painful way for me to lose than a smaller deficit with VERY PRECISE LOGGING and a lot of extreme accuracy.

    Which I just hate.

    That said I'm not doing any diet plan I have to pay for or has marketing schemes at all. Screw that, the diet industry is predatory and getting 0 dollars from me.

    Yeah I lost 20ish pounds in 8 weeks, and now I have maintained with a 3 lbs range for several weeks. If I go back on it and lose another 20, then maintain after that - not really sure what the issue is with that. And there is always going to be a difference in diet during a losing vs maintaining phase.
  • wunderkindkingwunderkindking Member Posts: 1,334 Member Member Posts: 1,334 Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    I actually am loosening up my belief that what you need to do, you need to do forever.

    I think you have to be prepared with an exit strategy, and to be prepared for some regain of at least water weight, and I don't think VLCD are a good idea unless your doctor puts you on one and is supervising it (this is sometimes necessary when weight is more dangerous than the very low calories), but.

    I think sometimes a week or two of going hard can be a good idea. Not forever but especially when there's not a lot to lose. I'm vaguely considering a similar thing now that I'm down to 10lbs from ideal. We'll see where I am in the fall but 2 weeks of restricting down to 1400ish calories (which no I could not maintain - that's a pretty big deficit for me) followed by 2 weeks maintaining might be a less painful way for me to lose than a smaller deficit with VERY PRECISE LOGGING and a lot of extreme accuracy.

    Which I just hate.

    That said I'm not doing any diet plan I have to pay for or has marketing schemes at all. Screw that, the diet industry is predatory and getting 0 dollars from me.

    Yeah I lost 20ish pounds in 8 weeks, and now I have maintained with a 3 lbs range for several weeks. If I go back on it and lose another 20, then maintain after that - not really sure what the issue is with that. And there is always going to be a difference in diet during a losing vs maintaining phase.

    Yeah, but usually that difference being pretty minimal is a good thing - I get that. Stepping slowly to maintain and only gaining a couple of hundred calories can prevent some problems. I do get it. REALLY! Too much change and some people will go hog wild and overshoot.

    But also I only have 10lbs left to lose and I really really do not like having to be extremely accurate and if there's an exit strategy to prevent that (or that's not your psychology)... I don't really see an issue. Be educated and aware and also please god don't make me get that precise have I mentioned I hate it? LOL.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 7,609 Member Member Posts: 7,609 Member
    I actually am loosening up my belief that what you need to do, you need to do forever.

    I think you have to be prepared with an exit strategy, and to be prepared for some regain of at least water weight, and I don't think VLCD are a good idea unless your doctor puts you on one and is supervising it (this is sometimes necessary when weight is more dangerous than the very low calories), but.

    I think sometimes a week or two of going hard can be a good idea. Not forever but especially when there's not a lot to lose. I'm vaguely considering a similar thing now that I'm down to 10lbs from ideal. We'll see where I am in the fall but 2 weeks of restricting down to 1400ish calories (which I could not maintain - that's a pretty big deficit for me) and that's likely to involve cutting some things I could not give up forever. Then do 2 weeks maintaining, and rotating.

    I feel like that might be a less painful way for me to lose the last bit than a smaller deficit with VERY PRECISE LOGGING and a lot of extreme accuracy. Which I just *hate*.

    That said I'm not doing any diet plan I have to pay for or has marketing schemes at all. Screw that, the diet industry is predatory and getting 0 dollars from me.

    I agree with all of this. Rather than needing to do something forever, you need to understand what you are doing, why, and why it is working for you. For me, an important part of this was NOT following someone else's plan, but knowing how to eat a sensible nutritious diet and to meal plan for myself. I have broad guidelines about how I eat, but no inflexible rules. Most of that "diet" seems like a combination of just normal healthy eating (which is great if one doesn't already have a healthy diet, but eating 25-30 g of fiber, for example, or a good amount of veg just doesn't strike me as particularly challenging or something one needs to follow a set plan to do. No grains but quinoa, on the other hand, or absolutely no added sugar ever, or eat only a few lower sugar types of fruit and otherwise avoid fruit seem to me to be kind of pointless inflexible rules unless they are things that a particular person decides would be good for them for their own reasons -- reasons that would be more specific than "only way to lose if menopausal."
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 21,947 Member Member, Premium Posts: 21,947 Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    @33gail33 It is about doing an intermittent Fast, cutting sugar, increasing fiber (veggies). It's really a good livable plan. Not expensive. No re-ocurring fee. So way cheaper than any plan I've ever tried over the years. Its also for menopausal women. So I'm not sure what all the mansplaining about menopausal women's bodies is in this thread. Not sure why they're here, but it's a diet that really would be healthy and affordable for you too. Welcome.
    no correct information has been posted in this group about this diet by other people. Its not restrictive at all. Its for reducing inflammation in menopausal women's bodies and therefore helping us lose the stubborn weight. It's not expensive. There's nothing to buy really but the instructions on how to do it. It's more of a method of eating than a diet.


    I am a post menopausal woman - started losing weight in 2013 when I was a peri menopausal woman, kept it off ever since.

    Did not buy any diet plan, just followed free MFP calorie counting method - way cheaper than any other plan since free.
    Healthy as you like and affordable and since I didnt notice any inflammation in my post menopausal body compared to my pre menopausal body, reducing inflammation was not an issue for me

    Nor was 'stubborn weight' - it came off at a slow and steady pace, jut like it does for other people who are not menopausal women, if they eat at an appropriate calorie deficit.


    PS a 'method of eating' by definition is a diet.


    OK. It's great for you that menopause hasn't had a detrimental effect on your body - I am jealous.

    Since menopause I have developed frozen shoulder, osteoarthritis, insomnia, hot flashes, chronic rhino-sinusitis and last year post viral fatigue syndrome. And skin cancer. Reducing inflammation is a huge factor for me, up there with weight loss. I am 56 and feel like I have aged 20 years since I turned 50.

    The anti-inflammatory type diet I mentioned I was on for 8 weeks (which sounds very similar to the one in the OP) allowed me to straighten my knee completely for the first time in several years, and also reduced bloating and increased energy - along with losing 20 lbs. I started exercising again a couple of weeks into it which is key for me.

    And yes a "method of eating" is a diet - therefore we are all technically on a diet.

    Well . . . .

    Individual menopause experiences differ, certainly. Reducing systemic inflammation (if a person has it) can be very beneficial, and potentially applies to any age, of course.

    The unfortunate experiences you've had post-menopause include several things that occur randomly in the population, or become more common with aging in both sexes, in addition to some that are pretty commonly considered to be more directly menopause related (like hot flashes, sleep issues).

    I do sympathize, and have experienced some (not all) of the same since menopause, but for me menopause was 20 years ago (around age 44, chemotherapy induced, immediate symptoms at the time magnified by 7.5 years of anti-estrogen drugs afterward). The health conditions spread out widely over those 20 years, for me. As a result, I'm less inclined to consider them directly *caused* by menopause vs. aging, genetics coming home to roost, cumulative effects of lifestyle, etc. On top of that, I started exercising loooong before weight loss (about 12 years being very active, ages 44-60, while still at/over the line into obese). That gives me a different perspective on the correlations between symptoms/conditions and the 2-3 interventions (exercise, weight loss, composition of diet).

    Doesn't matter, though. That sort of health condition stuff stinks, regardless of causes. Sympathies! I'm glad you've found some relief.
  • 33gail3333gail33 Member Posts: 998 Member Member Posts: 998 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    @33gail33 It is about doing an intermittent Fast, cutting sugar, increasing fiber (veggies). It's really a good livable plan. Not expensive. No re-ocurring fee. So way cheaper than any plan I've ever tried over the years. Its also for menopausal women. So I'm not sure what all the mansplaining about menopausal women's bodies is in this thread. Not sure why they're here, but it's a diet that really would be healthy and affordable for you too. Welcome.
    no correct information has been posted in this group about this diet by other people. Its not restrictive at all. Its for reducing inflammation in menopausal women's bodies and therefore helping us lose the stubborn weight. It's not expensive. There's nothing to buy really but the instructions on how to do it. It's more of a method of eating than a diet.


    I am a post menopausal woman - started losing weight in 2013 when I was a peri menopausal woman, kept it off ever since.

    Did not buy any diet plan, just followed free MFP calorie counting method - way cheaper than any other plan since free.
    Healthy as you like and affordable and since I didnt notice any inflammation in my post menopausal body compared to my pre menopausal body, reducing inflammation was not an issue for me

    Nor was 'stubborn weight' - it came off at a slow and steady pace, jut like it does for other people who are not menopausal women, if they eat at an appropriate calorie deficit.


    PS a 'method of eating' by definition is a diet.


    OK. It's great for you that menopause hasn't had a detrimental effect on your body - I am jealous.

    Since menopause I have developed frozen shoulder, osteoarthritis, insomnia, hot flashes, chronic rhino-sinusitis and last year post viral fatigue syndrome. And skin cancer. Reducing inflammation is a huge factor for me, up there with weight loss. I am 56 and feel like I have aged 20 years since I turned 50.

    The anti-inflammatory type diet I mentioned I was on for 8 weeks (which sounds very similar to the one in the OP) allowed me to straighten my knee completely for the first time in several years, and also reduced bloating and increased energy - along with losing 20 lbs. I started exercising again a couple of weeks into it which is key for me.

    And yes a "method of eating" is a diet - therefore we are all technically on a diet.

    Well . . . .

    Individual menopause experiences differ, certainly. Reducing systemic inflammation (if a person has it) can be very beneficial, and potentially applies to any age, of course.

    The unfortunate experiences you've had post-menopause include several things that occur randomly in the population, or become more common with aging in both sexes, in addition to some that are pretty commonly considered to be more directly menopause related (like hot flashes, sleep issues).

    I do sympathize, and have experienced some (not all) of the same since menopause, but for me menopause was 20 years ago (around age 44, chemotherapy induced, immediate symptoms at the time magnified by 7.5 years of anti-estrogen drugs afterward). The health conditions spread out widely over those 20 years, for me. As a result, I'm less inclined to consider them directly *caused* by menopause vs. aging, genetics coming home to roost, cumulative effects of lifestyle, etc. On top of that, I started exercising loooong before weight loss (about 12 years being very active, ages 44-60, while still at/over the line into obese). That gives me a different perspective on the correlations between symptoms/conditions and the 2-3 interventions (exercise, weight loss, composition of diet).

    Doesn't matter, though. That sort of health condition stuff stinks, regardless of causes. Sympathies! I'm glad you've found some relief.

    Fwiw I have always exercised - I was a runner for many years up until I had to give it up due to knee arthritis. Not sure if it is what you meant to say, but the implication I am reading is that perhaps my weight and lifestyle contributed to my health problems? I was not obese until the last year (at age 55) and was always active (running, biking, kayaking) up until things started going downhill for me with my frozen shoulder at age 49, and continued down from there.

    So for me the health issues came first, and led to the weight gain.

    When I said I "started exercising again" I meant that last summer at the height of my post viral fatigue I couldn't find the energy for several months to do anything really, and I "started again" after that short period of layoff.

    I am fairly confident that the frozen shoulder, and hot flashes (and by extension insomnia) are hormone/menopause related - but yes some of the other could be "just" age related.
    edited June 17
  • kingscrownkingscrown Member, Premium Posts: 615 Member Member, Premium Posts: 615 Member
    @33gail33 Diet has such a negative appearance. I've been told for years that one doesn't want to be on a "diet." So I've learned to eat healthy for me. I too, have lost weight the regular way with healthy eating, exercise, and MFP. I could only go so far though. I had a last 20 pounds that just didn't budge. I exercised myself into a knot of pain over 8 years. Then I found out that exercise and healthy eating was not the end all and be all for me. It's IF and not eating inflammatory foods that's gotten my weight to start to move down again.

    I'm not looking to sway anyone to start this. My hope was to find someone else on this journey for support. What do I get... rescuers and the strangest kind. Basing their help on the completely wrong information. It's like they see a drowning person and throw a stalk of broccoli at their head. How is that going to make them float?
  • kingscrownkingscrown Member, Premium Posts: 615 Member Member, Premium Posts: 615 Member
    @springlering62 Thank you I do want to get to the finish line. I started in 2011 with exercise and healthy eating. Got 86 pounds off and then got stuck with the last 24 pounds. No amount of diet and exercise budged it. Me nor any professional could get it to move. They'd say... MORE exercise, Don't eat below 1200 calories. The weight stayed, my shoulders were now frozen, my left piriformis was inflamed all the time and my right plantar fasciitis

    This diet only alters my plan slightly. Consistent IF, eating foods that aren't inflammatory, no deprivation, exercise (not at the boot camp level), and now my weight is moving down. It's not a crazy unhealthy plan or I wouldn't do it.

    As far as healthy advice from Tiktok....hahaha its a starting place for quick snippets to see if one is interested. Geeze I've got a grip on myself and my health.
  • kingscrownkingscrown Member, Premium Posts: 615 Member Member, Premium Posts: 615 Member
    @33gail33 for my frozen shoulders from too much bootcamp classes over 6-8 years in my 50's I quit them and started pilates as recommended by a massage therapist. They asked me why I was pounding my body so hard for a woman my age. hmmmm. I did pilates for nearly 4 years in the first year both my shoulders were back to normal. My left in 6 months and my right took nearly a year before I could one day reach up and open my morning blinds without a catch. Pilates was gentle and they showed me the proper way to use my shoulders.
  • 33gail3333gail33 Member Posts: 998 Member Member Posts: 998 Member
    kingscrown wrote: »
    @33gail33 for my frozen shoulders from too much bootcamp classes over 6-8 years in my 50's I quit them and started pilates as recommended by a massage therapist. They asked me why I was pounding my body so hard for a woman my age. hmmmm. I did pilates for nearly 4 years in the first year both my shoulders were back to normal. My left in 6 months and my right took nearly a year before I could one day reach up and open my morning blinds without a catch. Pilates was gentle and they showed me the proper way to use my shoulders.

    Interesting thanks. My frozen shoulders were "idiopathic" as I didn't have an injury, but I have since learned that menopause is a factor. They have long since healed and I have almost complete mobility back now. The first one took about 18 months, and three cortisone shots in the second one stopped it from freezing completely before it got as bad as the first.

    Hard to believe that I had just started training for my first sprint triathlon back then when the shoulders went. Never got back there. :(
    edited June 17
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 21,947 Member Member, Premium Posts: 21,947 Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    @33gail33 It is about doing an intermittent Fast, cutting sugar, increasing fiber (veggies). It's really a good livable plan. Not expensive. No re-ocurring fee. So way cheaper than any plan I've ever tried over the years. Its also for menopausal women. So I'm not sure what all the mansplaining about menopausal women's bodies is in this thread. Not sure why they're here, but it's a diet that really would be healthy and affordable for you too. Welcome.
    no correct information has been posted in this group about this diet by other people. Its not restrictive at all. Its for reducing inflammation in menopausal women's bodies and therefore helping us lose the stubborn weight. It's not expensive. There's nothing to buy really but the instructions on how to do it. It's more of a method of eating than a diet.


    I am a post menopausal woman - started losing weight in 2013 when I was a peri menopausal woman, kept it off ever since.

    Did not buy any diet plan, just followed free MFP calorie counting method - way cheaper than any other plan since free.
    Healthy as you like and affordable and since I didnt notice any inflammation in my post menopausal body compared to my pre menopausal body, reducing inflammation was not an issue for me

    Nor was 'stubborn weight' - it came off at a slow and steady pace, jut like it does for other people who are not menopausal women, if they eat at an appropriate calorie deficit.


    PS a 'method of eating' by definition is a diet.


    OK. It's great for you that menopause hasn't had a detrimental effect on your body - I am jealous.

    Since menopause I have developed frozen shoulder, osteoarthritis, insomnia, hot flashes, chronic rhino-sinusitis and last year post viral fatigue syndrome. And skin cancer. Reducing inflammation is a huge factor for me, up there with weight loss. I am 56 and feel like I have aged 20 years since I turned 50.

    The anti-inflammatory type diet I mentioned I was on for 8 weeks (which sounds very similar to the one in the OP) allowed me to straighten my knee completely for the first time in several years, and also reduced bloating and increased energy - along with losing 20 lbs. I started exercising again a couple of weeks into it which is key for me.

    And yes a "method of eating" is a diet - therefore we are all technically on a diet.

    Well . . . .

    Individual menopause experiences differ, certainly. Reducing systemic inflammation (if a person has it) can be very beneficial, and potentially applies to any age, of course.

    The unfortunate experiences you've had post-menopause include several things that occur randomly in the population, or become more common with aging in both sexes, in addition to some that are pretty commonly considered to be more directly menopause related (like hot flashes, sleep issues).

    I do sympathize, and have experienced some (not all) of the same since menopause, but for me menopause was 20 years ago (around age 44, chemotherapy induced, immediate symptoms at the time magnified by 7.5 years of anti-estrogen drugs afterward). The health conditions spread out widely over those 20 years, for me. As a result, I'm less inclined to consider them directly *caused* by menopause vs. aging, genetics coming home to roost, cumulative effects of lifestyle, etc. On top of that, I started exercising loooong before weight loss (about 12 years being very active, ages 44-60, while still at/over the line into obese). That gives me a different perspective on the correlations between symptoms/conditions and the 2-3 interventions (exercise, weight loss, composition of diet).

    Doesn't matter, though. That sort of health condition stuff stinks, regardless of causes. Sympathies! I'm glad you've found some relief.

    Fwiw I have always exercised - I was a runner for many years up until I had to give it up due to knee arthritis. Not sure if it is what you meant to say, but the implication I am reading is that perhaps my weight and lifestyle contributed to my health problems? I was not obese until the last year (at age 55) and was always active (running, biking, kayaking) up until things started going downhill for me with my frozen shoulder at age 49, and continued down from there.

    So for me the health issues came first, and led to the weight gain.

    When I said I "started exercising again" I meant that last summer at the height of my post viral fatigue I couldn't find the energy for several months to do anything really, and I "started again" after that short period of layoff.

    I am fairly confident that the frozen shoulder, and hot flashes (and by extension insomnia) are hormone/menopause related - but yes some of the other could be "just" age related.

    No, the bolded is not necessarily what I intended. Weight and lifestyle *can* contribute to physical problems that pop up as the years accumulate, but I don't know you or your history at all. I'm trying to say that generically there are a lot of factors, that the longer we're lucky to be alive, the statistical odds are that more things will pop up. I have no doubt that menopause has consequences; I'm just trying to say that it's complicated, really hard to sort out causation from correlation.

    Generically - again, not talking directly to your case - I've seen many things blamed on menopause, that can also happen to people who people who aren't in menopause. Menopause could still be a cause for some of those things in some people, but it's really hard to tell what's menopause, what's aging, what's genetics coming home to roost, what's related to eating (current or former), environmental exposures to something sometime somewhere, and more.

    I agree with the point someone else made that menopause seems to be becoming a strong marketing focus for diet, exercise, supplement, and other health products/services. It's in those marketers' interests to link many, many possible bad things to menopause, in that context. I'm skeptical, in a generic sense - a caveat emptor sense - that all the claimed causation links are real, or statistically significant. That's not an observation about any particular person. But when something is marketed as extra good for menopausal women, for me warning lights come on.
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