Coronavirus prep

1695696698700701728

Replies

  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,626 Member
    edited January 9
    Last month, my mom was wondering how we'd go about getting tested if we developed symptoms. I don't have to worry about this - I'm with the VA. (Of course I looked into testing for the rest of them.)

    When I joined the USAF in the late 80s, healthcare benefits were furthest from my mind, but I'm so glad I have them now. Sure, I have my complaints, especially when it comes to female-specific care, but during this pandemic I am so glad to be with the VA.

    I was there regularly last year for this and that, and am not seeing crowds or hearing about burnout.

    In many ways, VA healthcare is an example of socialized medicine.

    https://www.verywellhealth.com/what-is-socialized-medicine-2615267

    "...While scandals arise from how the VA provides care, it is a measure of how the VA is accountable to the public, while private healthcare organizations do not have to be transparent."
  • SModa61
    SModa61 Posts: 2,090 Member
    Commenting on the theme of possible reactions and continued boosters. For starters, do note that I am fully Pfizer vaxxed through booster. That said, I have not had "extreme" reactions, but still the talk of a 4th shot does not have me excited...... Hopefully, I will be in a positive frame of mind by then.

    I know of a couple people with unusual medical situations shortly after getting vaccinated. I am curious about their booster decisions. I will have to ask.
  • ReenieHJ
    ReenieHJ Posts: 9,512 Member
    @allother94,
    It's mind boggling that people are still not choosing to get vaccinated. They must be seeing all of this play out?? But instead of turning unvaccinated people away at the hospitals, why don't they turn them away everywhere else? Maybe it'd force their hand a bit more. JMO
  • ythannah
    ythannah Posts: 4,187 Member
    I actually can’t overstate how nightmarish it was sitting in a walk-in refrigerator being ignored for seven hours. My ribs hurt the next day from shivering so hard. The hospital system keeps sending me “Please fill out our survey and let us know how you would describe your visit” forms but I haven’t filled them out because the whole experience seems unreal. Three words to describe my ER experience, really? Nightmarish? Third world countryish? Apocalyptic? Don’t ask if you don’t want to hear the answer! And this is a world class medical facility in a city known for its good hospitals.

    That sounds horrifying.

    By contrast, in October 2020 (cases low here) I went to our ER as a then 56 year old woman with chest pain. Although I was clear that I'd had the pain for a month at that point and it was sternum pain related to movement (I thought I'd pulled a muscle badly), I was immediately tested for possible heart attack. Diagnosis was eventually costochondritis.

    March 2021 (record high cases here) I am back in ER with severe abdominal pain. Since this is a possible Covid symptom I have to sit in the Covid side of the waiting room. I am the only person in the waiting room. As I get shuffled back and forth for various tests I end up twice in exam rooms with people who report having Covid; I don't become infected. I think I got to ER around 11 AM and 3 AM the following morning I get emergency surgery.

    And, as a lifter, anyone who has to stick a needle into me comments that I have "really good veins" :D
  • lokihen
    lokihen Posts: 372 Member
    I just saw a report on the local news site that cloth masks are not effective against omicron. In order of protection they suggested: N95, KN95, or surgical masks.
  • SModa61
    SModa61 Posts: 2,090 Member
    lokihen wrote: »
    I just saw a report on the local news site that cloth masks are not effective against omicron. In order of protection they suggested: N95, KN95, or surgical masks.

    Our news added KF94, but I don't think it included surgical masks (not as form fitting around the sides maybe?).
  • nooshi713
    nooshi713 Posts: 4,842 Member
    ChelzFit wrote: »
    allother94 wrote: »
    nooshi713 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Heard a report (NPR news) today about a hospital where they test everyone on arrival, no matter what has brought them to the hospital/ER, no matter whether Covid-symptomatic or not. With the Omicron wave, 1 in 7 people coming into the hospital are testing positive. The test report comes back after they've been in the hospital for a while, if only in the ER.

    Those presenting for other conditions, with no Covid symptoms, have by that time encountered various staff members who are not in full Covid-precautions mode. It's leading to an increase in cases among the staff, usually minor because staff are vaccinated. Even so, staff need to isolate for a minimum of 5 days, so even more staffing shortages are resulting.

    There are a lot of moving parts to all of these systems, and new circumstances cause new complications/problems.

    Another reason to stay away from the ER if you don't truly need to be there is the potential to contract Covid from fellow patients in the ER. Obviously, don't stay away if you have a serious medical problem. It's a balance of risks question.

    Very true! If one doesn’t have Covid then there is a high chance of catching it by coming in. Everyone who has had a potential exposure or respiratory symptoms even if not Covid are lumped together in our Covid tent, because we can’t put them with the general population.

    We are short staffed again tomorrow. It sucks. And patients complain so much about the wait times not realizing we get no breaks, bend over backwards for them, and put our health on the line. This pandemic has really made me lose faith in humanity as a whole.

    My current stance is that hospitals should turn away unvaccinated patients and not offer testing. That should solve the CoVid hospital problem.

    Why don’t hospitals have an online checking and waiting system? I know emergencies are just that, but what good does it do sitting in a room for 10 hours when you can stay at home until you can be seen?

    I am for the vaccine, but I also don't really feel that we need to turn away those from the hospital that are unvaccinated. What about those that choose not to get vaccinated because of a reaction. For example my dad is 66 years old. He went in and got his Pfizer shot and had about two weeks of body aches, fatigue and felt awful. After getting his second shot, within in 24 hours he was rushed to the hospital in severe pain. He stayed in the hospital over a week, turns out there was increasing inflammation that was pushing on a nerve in his back. He had to have surgery and it has almost been a year and is still not able to walk without a limp. There was no proof that it was the vaccine, but now he is really scared to get his booster and I don't blame him.
    My father in law is another one that won't be getting his booster. After his two shots his RA flared up and has been worse ever since. I know it could all be a coincidence, but why look down on those who choose not to get vaccinated because of reactions they have had.

    I have lupus, and my lupus flared after both shots and the booster. That’s not all that surprising since any vaccine usually makes me flare for about a week. You know what’s worse than a lupus flare, though? Death.

    Also, if an autoimmune condition was going to flare in response to the vaccine, it will certainly flare even worse in response to the disease.
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    allother94 wrote: »
    nooshi713 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Heard a report (NPR news) today about a hospital where they test everyone on arrival, no matter what has brought them to the hospital/ER, no matter whether Covid-symptomatic or not. With the Omicron wave, 1 in 7 people coming into the hospital are testing positive. The test report comes back after they've been in the hospital for a while, if only in the ER.

    Those presenting for other conditions, with no Covid symptoms, have by that time encountered various staff members who are not in full Covid-precautions mode. It's leading to an increase in cases among the staff, usually minor because staff are vaccinated. Even so, staff need to isolate for a minimum of 5 days, so even more staffing shortages are resulting.

    There are a lot of moving parts to all of these systems, and new circumstances cause new complications/problems.

    Another reason to stay away from the ER if you don't truly need to be there is the potential to contract Covid from fellow patients in the ER. Obviously, don't stay away if you have a serious medical problem. It's a balance of risks question.

    Very true! If one doesn’t have Covid then there is a high chance of catching it by coming in. Everyone who has had a potential exposure or respiratory symptoms even if not Covid are lumped together in our Covid tent, because we can’t put them with the general population.

    We are short staffed again tomorrow. It sucks. And patients complain so much about the wait times not realizing we get no breaks, bend over backwards for them, and put our health on the line. This pandemic has really made me lose faith in humanity as a whole.

    My current stance is that hospitals should turn away unvaccinated patients and not offer testing. That should solve the CoVid hospital problem.

    Why don’t hospitals have an online checking and waiting system? I know emergencies are just that, but what good does it do sitting in a room for 10 hours when you can stay at home until you can be seen?

    The ER is for emergencies. By definition, you can't schedule an emergency. In your scenario you schedule time in an ER for something and 5 minutes before you get there 20 patients bleeding out from a school bus accident arrive with more on the way and 5 people involved in drive-by shooting show up. Then you are waiting again.

    100% true
  • ahoy_m8
    ahoy_m8 Posts: 2,834 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    My whole immediate family has tested COVID + last week. We had ordered RAT kits from CVS earlier in the week and they didn't arrive until Saturday, but we were pretty sure we all had it as I don't recall ever having all 4 of us sick at the same time. Took the tests on Saturday evening and it confirmed what we thought. My wife and I both took PCR tests on Friday at a drive through site, but haven't received those results yet.

    We are all vaxed and my wife and I are also boosted. For the most part, this has been a non event for us thankfully, and I believe the vaccine has a lot do do with that. Here's our timeline:

    Tuesday: wife called me in the early afternoon saying she was going home with a runny nose. She never really had anything more than that and it was over by Wednesday.

    Wednesday: I started feeling somewhat poorly in the early evening on my commute home from work. I had felt perfectly fine throughout the day. By bed time I had developed a "head cold" and had a great deal of difficulty sleeping with all of the stuffiness.

    Thursday: Bad head cold for me that continued to get worse throughout the day. I worked from home until about 3 PM and was exhausted at that point. By late afternoon I had a headache that wouldn't stop and weeping and burning eyes along with a great deal of congestion and sneezing and runny nose and a bit of a cough.

    Friday: I was just as bad as I was late Thursday and took the day off to rest. My youngest son (9) had developed symptoms over the night Thursday and woke up with a temperature of 101.4, vomiting, sore throat, and congestion; he slept most of the day but started feeling much better by Friday evening, as did I. My oldest son (11) also developed symptoms Friday, but very mild...just some barely noticeable congestion (you can only really tell when he talked) and a scratchy throat, but not particularly sore. He didn't developed anything worse than that.

    Saturday: We all woke up feeling pretty much recovered which was odd for me. I have enlarged sinuses and usually when I get a bad head cold it knocks me for a loop for at least a week and here I was feeling about 95% recovered. Still a bit nasally when I talk and a slight cough. My youngest who had it so bad on Friday seemed to be pretty much back to normal. Nasally when he talks, but he was out on the trampoline Saturday morning. Wife and oldest seemed 100% fine. I was able to get in a 3 mile walk, but I am still feeling some fatigue and a bit of burning in my lungs...I wanted to do a workout on Zwift but I don't think I would have made it through those intervals. We took our RAT Saturday evening and all popped...we put our kids tests in their keep sake boxes as I'm sure they'll be the ones with all of the stories to tell about these last two years.

    Sunday: Pretty much status quo. Some lingering gunk for me and my youngest. I went for another walk.

    Today: we all feel pretty much fine. I found out that I can't return to work until January 24 as my office still has a very archaic 14 days from positive test protocol in place...it has been in place since May of 2020 and they have apparently abandoned the science on this at this point. I'm going to give Zwift a go this afternoon and see where my cardio capacity is. I want to get into the weight room and I'm now past the timeframe per CDC guidance, but will likely wait until next week, at which point I will be going absolutely stir crazy working from home with my whole family here.



    My brother had a mild case. He never felt bad but one night was wheezing & had trouble breathing. He has well controlled asthma so that was a bit scary. But he was still XC skiing in a state park well away from anyone else for a few miles every day through the whole thing. FWIW, he said elevating his HR and breathing deeply made his lungs feel better. Hope you're back to normal and killing it on Zwift.
  • TX_Bluebonnet
    TX_Bluebonnet Posts: 244 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Last month, my mom was wondering how we'd go about getting tested if we developed symptoms. I don't have to worry about this - I'm with the VA. (Of course I looked into testing for the rest of them.)

    When I joined the USAF in the late 80s, healthcare benefits were furthest from my mind, but I'm so glad I have them now. Sure, I have my complaints, especially when it comes to female-specific care, but during this pandemic I am so glad to be with the VA.

    I was there regularly last year for this and that, and am not seeing crowds or hearing about burnout.

    In many ways, VA healthcare is an example of socialized medicine.

    https://www.verywellhealth.com/what-is-socialized-medicine-2615267

    "...While scandals arise from how the VA provides care, it is a measure of how the VA is accountable to the public, while private healthcare organizations do not have to be transparent."
    Seems it may be a fluid situation, or dependent on location. I received an email today regarding the North Texas VA. It says, in part, "Our clinics and our emergency department are NOT testing sites for COVID-19. We will NOT test non-emergent or asymptomatic outpatients for COVID-19, unless our staff deems it clinically necessary."

  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,626 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Last month, my mom was wondering how we'd go about getting tested if we developed symptoms. I don't have to worry about this - I'm with the VA. (Of course I looked into testing for the rest of them.)

    When I joined the USAF in the late 80s, healthcare benefits were furthest from my mind, but I'm so glad I have them now. Sure, I have my complaints, especially when it comes to female-specific care, but during this pandemic I am so glad to be with the VA.

    I was there regularly last year for this and that, and am not seeing crowds or hearing about burnout.

    In many ways, VA healthcare is an example of socialized medicine.

    https://www.verywellhealth.com/what-is-socialized-medicine-2615267

    "...While scandals arise from how the VA provides care, it is a measure of how the VA is accountable to the public, while private healthcare organizations do not have to be transparent."
    Seems it may be a fluid situation, or dependent on location. I received an email today regarding the North Texas VA. It says, in part, "Our clinics and our emergency department are NOT testing sites for COVID-19. We will NOT test non-emergent or asymptomatic outpatients for COVID-19, unless our staff deems it clinically necessary."

    I don't have a quibble with the VA not testing non-emergent or asymptomatic outpatients. Mom was wondering what to do if we DID develop symptoms.
  • allother94
    allother94 Posts: 588 Member
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    @allother94,
    It's mind boggling that people are still not choosing to get vaccinated. They must be seeing all of this play out?? But instead of turning unvaccinated people away at the hospitals, why don't they turn them away everywhere else? Maybe it'd force their hand a bit more. JMO

    They say the problem with the spread is overcrowding hospitals. If that really is the problem, then that is what they should address…