Sugars in fruit.

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Replies

  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,076 Member
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    gpanda103 wrote: »
    Sugar in fruit and stuff like that is much different than added sugars

    Why is the fructose in the fruit I eat different to the fructose in my sports drink?

    The quantity of fructose per gram in the sports drink is very different from the quantity of fructose per gram of a piece of fruit. And the fruit comes with fiber. How much fiber does that sports drink have? But you are correct in that fructose is fructose is fructose is fructose. Take that sports drink, mix it 50/50 with water, and add some Metamucil powder to it... they'd be fairly similar

    But I don't want to be taking in fibre when I'm cycling long distances, I just want the easy availability of energy from the glucose/fructose mix. My perfectly adequate fibre intake comes from the rest of my diet.

    Care needs to be taken making statements that are factually incorrect. It can lead to a mistaken focus on the individual components of a diet rather than diet as a complete whole.

    "Fruit is different to straight sugar" would be true but that's also something that really doesn't need saying!

    You could also just as easily get the fructose from a coke or mountain dew... they're all the same.

    As a semi-retired endurance cyclist, a Coke or Mt Dew isn't going to travel very well on a bike, nor will the bubbles feel particularly good. Sports drinks are also infused with electrolytes which need to be replenished when you're cycling for hours at a time. Sodas don't have electrolytes.

    Oh, so you're saying the source you get your fructose from does... in fact... matter. Thank you.

    That's not really what I'm saying at all....but thanks for playing. In the context of endurance cycling or endurance sports of any kind a sports drink is superior to a soda because it has electrolytes and travels well on a bike...has zip to do with the fructose aspect. Fructose is fructose is fructose.

    And if the source didn't matter, you wouldn't consider ANY of those other variables, is my point. The source matters specifically because of all those other variables you so kindly mention.

    200w.gif

    You're entirely missing the point. Fructose is fructose is fructose...your body doesn't treat it any differently regardless of source. Obviously there would be situations where one form would be superior specific to that situation...but that has nothing to do with the fructose itself. This really isn't that hard.
  • glassyo
    glassyo Posts: 6,668 Member
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    gpanda103 wrote: »
    Sugar in fruit and stuff like that is much different than added sugars

    Why is the fructose in the fruit I eat different to the fructose in my sports drink?

    The quantity of fructose per gram in the sports drink is very different from the quantity of fructose per gram of a piece of fruit. And the fruit comes with fiber. How much fiber does that sports drink have? But you are correct in that fructose is fructose is fructose is fructose. Take that sports drink, mix it 50/50 with water, and add some Metamucil powder to it... they'd be fairly similar

    But I don't want to be taking in fibre when I'm cycling long distances, I just want the easy availability of energy from the glucose/fructose mix. My perfectly adequate fibre intake comes from the rest of my diet.

    Care needs to be taken making statements that are factually incorrect. It can lead to a mistaken focus on the individual components of a diet rather than diet as a complete whole.

    "Fruit is different to straight sugar" would be true but that's also something that really doesn't need saying!

    You could also just as easily get the fructose from a coke or mountain dew... they're all the same.

    As a semi-retired endurance cyclist, a Coke or Mt Dew isn't going to travel very well on a bike, nor will the bubbles feel particularly good. Sports drinks are also infused with electrolytes which need to be replenished when you're cycling for hours at a time. Sodas don't have electrolytes.

    Oh, so you're saying the source you get your fructose from does... in fact... matter. Thank you.

    That's not really what I'm saying at all....but thanks for playing. In the context of endurance cycling or endurance sports of any kind a sports drink is superior to a soda because it has electrolytes and travels well on a bike...has zip to do with the fructose aspect. Fructose is fructose is fructose.

    And if the source didn't matter, you wouldn't consider ANY of those other variables, is my point. The source matters specifically because of all those other variables you so kindly mention.

    The source only matters IF you need the fiber or electrolytes or whatever other nutrients you're missing or want.

    The real point is the op was worried about eating fruit (with nutrients) because of the sugar but, since sugar is sugar is sugar, he didn't need to worry about that (the sugar) part.

    Now I just really want a nobody but me thinks there's any nutrition in a cookie...cookie :)
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,852 Member
    edited June 22
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    gpanda103 wrote: »
    Sugar in fruit and stuff like that is much different than added sugars

    Why is the fructose in the fruit I eat different to the fructose in my sports drink?

    The quantity of fructose per gram in the sports drink is very different from the quantity of fructose per gram of a piece of fruit. And the fruit comes with fiber. How much fiber does that sports drink have? But you are correct in that fructose is fructose is fructose is fructose. Take that sports drink, mix it 50/50 with water, and add some Metamucil powder to it... they'd be fairly similar

    But I don't want to be taking in fibre when I'm cycling long distances, I just want the easy availability of energy from the glucose/fructose mix. My perfectly adequate fibre intake comes from the rest of my diet.

    Care needs to be taken making statements that are factually incorrect. It can lead to a mistaken focus on the individual components of a diet rather than diet as a complete whole.

    "Fruit is different to straight sugar" would be true but that's also something that really doesn't need saying!

    You could also just as easily get the fructose from a coke or mountain dew... they're all the same.


    Wrong.

    Read the ingredients and you will see they are different. Because sports drink are formulated specifically for purpose and not just as a refreshing beverage. And different sports drinks have different purposes and dosages.
    A mix could be 2:1 ratio of glucose to fructose (though some are glucose only (glucose has faster absorbtion rate) for energy.
    Some have electrolytes to replenish what is lost through sweating (although some people prefer to work out their electrolytes separately). I don't need additional electrolytes in winter but do in hot weather.
    Some sports drinks will include caffeine (some won't).
    I've also used a mix that includes some protein which clearly Coke and Mountain Dew do not.

    The whole point I was making is that individual shared ingredients (including specific types of sugar (and even water!) will be identical. That's it. You can't extrapolate to saying two different drinks with different ingredients are "all the same".
  • sollyn23l2
    sollyn23l2 Posts: 270 Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    gpanda103 wrote: »
    Sugar in fruit and stuff like that is much different than added sugars

    Why is the fructose in the fruit I eat different to the fructose in my sports drink?

    The quantity of fructose per gram in the sports drink is very different from the quantity of fructose per gram of a piece of fruit. And the fruit comes with fiber. How much fiber does that sports drink have? But you are correct in that fructose is fructose is fructose is fructose. Take that sports drink, mix it 50/50 with water, and add some Metamucil powder to it... they'd be fairly similar

    But I don't want to be taking in fibre when I'm cycling long distances, I just want the easy availability of energy from the glucose/fructose mix. My perfectly adequate fibre intake comes from the rest of my diet.

    Care needs to be taken making statements that are factually incorrect. It can lead to a mistaken focus on the individual components of a diet rather than diet as a complete whole.

    "Fruit is different to straight sugar" would be true but that's also something that really doesn't need saying!

    You could also just as easily get the fructose from a coke or mountain dew... they're all the same.


    Wrong.

    Read the ingredients and you will see they are different. Because sports drink are formulated specifically for purpose and not just as a refreshing beverage. And different sports drinks have different purposes and dosages.
    A mix could be 2:1 ratio of glucose to fructose (though some are glucose only (glucose has faster absorbtion rate) for energy.
    Some have electrolytes to replenish what is lost through sweating (although some people prefer to work out their electrolytes separately). I don't need additional electrolytes in winter but do in hot weather.
    Some sports drinks will include caffeine (some won't).
    I've also used a mix that includes some protein which clearly Coke and Mountain Dew do not.

    The whole point I was making is that individual shared ingredients (including specific types of sugar (and even water!) will be identical. That's it. You can't extrapolate to saying two different drinks with different ingredients are "all the same".

    That was my exact point. You are correct, good sir. The other poster was trying to say they were the same. I was not.
  • ccrdragon
    ccrdragon Posts: 3,278 Member
    They are not saying that source matters, they are saying CONTEXT and SOURCE matter.

    For the average non-endurance training person, neither context nor source matter. If you are running marathons (or even just running more than a couple of miles) or doing long distance biking, then the source does matter - because in that context, you will be sweating out large amounts of electrolytes that need to be replenished as well as blowing thru a large amount of energy to sustain the exercise.
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,852 Member
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    gpanda103 wrote: »
    Sugar in fruit and stuff like that is much different than added sugars

    Why is the fructose in the fruit I eat different to the fructose in my sports drink?

    The quantity of fructose per gram in the sports drink is very different from the quantity of fructose per gram of a piece of fruit. And the fruit comes with fiber. How much fiber does that sports drink have? But you are correct in that fructose is fructose is fructose is fructose. Take that sports drink, mix it 50/50 with water, and add some Metamucil powder to it... they'd be fairly similar

    But I don't want to be taking in fibre when I'm cycling long distances, I just want the easy availability of energy from the glucose/fructose mix. My perfectly adequate fibre intake comes from the rest of my diet.

    Care needs to be taken making statements that are factually incorrect. It can lead to a mistaken focus on the individual components of a diet rather than diet as a complete whole.

    "Fruit is different to straight sugar" would be true but that's also something that really doesn't need saying!

    You could also just as easily get the fructose from a coke or mountain dew... they're all the same.


    Wrong.

    Read the ingredients and you will see they are different. Because sports drink are formulated specifically for purpose and not just as a refreshing beverage. And different sports drinks have different purposes and dosages.
    A mix could be 2:1 ratio of glucose to fructose (though some are glucose only (glucose has faster absorbtion rate) for energy.
    Some have electrolytes to replenish what is lost through sweating (although some people prefer to work out their electrolytes separately). I don't need additional electrolytes in winter but do in hot weather.
    Some sports drinks will include caffeine (some won't).
    I've also used a mix that includes some protein which clearly Coke and Mountain Dew do not.

    The whole point I was making is that individual shared ingredients (including specific types of sugar (and even water!) will be identical. That's it. You can't extrapolate to saying two different drinks with different ingredients are "all the same".

    That was my exact point. You are correct, good sir. The other poster was trying to say they were the same. I was not.

    If that really was your point then I'm sorry but you made a dreadful job of making it.

    You are also misrepresenting what @cwolfman13 said.
    He specifically pointed out some of the differences to correct your assertion "they're all the same" which you now seem to be retracting.
  • sollyn23l2
    sollyn23l2 Posts: 270 Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    gpanda103 wrote: »
    Sugar in fruit and stuff like that is much different than added sugars

    Why is the fructose in the fruit I eat different to the fructose in my sports drink?

    The quantity of fructose per gram in the sports drink is very different from the quantity of fructose per gram of a piece of fruit. And the fruit comes with fiber. How much fiber does that sports drink have? But you are correct in that fructose is fructose is fructose is fructose. Take that sports drink, mix it 50/50 with water, and add some Metamucil powder to it... they'd be fairly similar

    But I don't want to be taking in fibre when I'm cycling long distances, I just want the easy availability of energy from the glucose/fructose mix. My perfectly adequate fibre intake comes from the rest of my diet.

    Care needs to be taken making statements that are factually incorrect. It can lead to a mistaken focus on the individual components of a diet rather than diet as a complete whole.

    "Fruit is different to straight sugar" would be true but that's also something that really doesn't need saying!

    You could also just as easily get the fructose from a coke or mountain dew... they're all the same.


    Wrong.

    Read the ingredients and you will see they are different. Because sports drink are formulated specifically for purpose and not just as a refreshing beverage. And different sports drinks have different purposes and dosages.
    A mix could be 2:1 ratio of glucose to fructose (though some are glucose only (glucose has faster absorbtion rate) for energy.
    Some have electrolytes to replenish what is lost through sweating (although some people prefer to work out their electrolytes separately). I don't need additional electrolytes in winter but do in hot weather.
    Some sports drinks will include caffeine (some won't).
    I've also used a mix that includes some protein which clearly Coke and Mountain Dew do not.

    The whole point I was making is that individual shared ingredients (including specific types of sugar (and even water!) will be identical. That's it. You can't extrapolate to saying two different drinks with different ingredients are "all the same".

    That was my exact point. You are correct, good sir. The other poster was trying to say they were the same. I was not.

    If that really was your point then I'm sorry but you made a dreadful job of making it.

    You are also misrepresenting what @cwolfman13 said.
    He specifically pointed out some of the differences to correct your assertion "they're all the same" which you now seem to be retracting.

    Agreed. I made several comments, which clearly nobody read. My point was that, yes, fructose is fructose is fructose is fructose.... however, you will want to choose the source of your fructose based of the other ingredients that come along with the fructose.
  • glassyo
    glassyo Posts: 6,668 Member
    When I had the hiccups, to get rid of them I would down a spoonful of sugar and chug some water backwards out of a glass and it worked!
  • claireychn074
    claireychn074 Posts: 874 Member
    edited June 22
    sijomial wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    gpanda103 wrote: »
    Sugar in fruit and stuff like that is much different than added sugars

    Why is the fructose in the fruit I eat different to the fructose in my sports drink?

    The quantity of fructose per gram in the sports drink is very different from the quantity of fructose per gram of a piece of fruit. And the fruit comes with fiber. How much fiber does that sports drink have? But you are correct in that fructose is fructose is fructose is fructose. Take that sports drink, mix it 50/50 with water, and add some Metamucil powder to it... they'd be fairly similar

    But I don't want to be taking in fibre when I'm cycling long distances, I just want the easy availability of energy from the glucose/fructose mix. My perfectly adequate fibre intake comes from the rest of my diet.

    Care needs to be taken making statements that are factually incorrect. It can lead to a mistaken focus on the individual components of a diet rather than diet as a complete whole.

    "Fruit is different to straight sugar" would be true but that's also something that really doesn't need saying!

    You could also just as easily get the fructose from a coke or mountain dew... they're all the same.


    Wrong.

    Read the ingredients and you will see they are different. Because sports drink are formulated specifically for purpose and not just as a refreshing beverage. And different sports drinks have different purposes and dosages.
    A mix could be 2:1 ratio of glucose to fructose (though some are glucose only (glucose has faster absorbtion rate) for energy.
    Some have electrolytes to replenish what is lost through sweating (although some people prefer to work out their electrolytes separately). I don't need additional electrolytes in winter but do in hot weather.
    Some sports drinks will include caffeine (some won't).
    I've also used a mix that includes some protein which clearly Coke and Mountain Dew do not.

    The whole point I was making is that individual shared ingredients (including specific types of sugar (and even water!) will be identical. That's it. You can't extrapolate to saying two different drinks with different ingredients are "all the same".
    Well I can’t burp (at the risk of over-sharing here) so I would explode if I tried lifting after drinking coke 🤣 But lucozade sport is fine as it’s not fizzy 😀

    What sports drink do you use that has protein in it, or do you mix your own?
  • springlering62
    springlering62 Posts: 5,433 Member
    Unscientifically, N=1, the sugars in the fruit I eat now are hella lot better than the sugars in the candy, cookies, cakes, pies and ice cream I usedta wolf down daily.

    It’s all relative in my world.

    🤷🏻‍♀️
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,852 Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    gpanda103 wrote: »
    Sugar in fruit and stuff like that is much different than added sugars

    Why is the fructose in the fruit I eat different to the fructose in my sports drink?

    The quantity of fructose per gram in the sports drink is very different from the quantity of fructose per gram of a piece of fruit. And the fruit comes with fiber. How much fiber does that sports drink have? But you are correct in that fructose is fructose is fructose is fructose. Take that sports drink, mix it 50/50 with water, and add some Metamucil powder to it... they'd be fairly similar

    But I don't want to be taking in fibre when I'm cycling long distances, I just want the easy availability of energy from the glucose/fructose mix. My perfectly adequate fibre intake comes from the rest of my diet.

    Care needs to be taken making statements that are factually incorrect. It can lead to a mistaken focus on the individual components of a diet rather than diet as a complete whole.

    "Fruit is different to straight sugar" would be true but that's also something that really doesn't need saying!

    You could also just as easily get the fructose from a coke or mountain dew... they're all the same.


    Wrong.

    Read the ingredients and you will see they are different. Because sports drink are formulated specifically for purpose and not just as a refreshing beverage. And different sports drinks have different purposes and dosages.
    A mix could be 2:1 ratio of glucose to fructose (though some are glucose only (glucose has faster absorbtion rate) for energy.
    Some have electrolytes to replenish what is lost through sweating (although some people prefer to work out their electrolytes separately). I don't need additional electrolytes in winter but do in hot weather.
    Some sports drinks will include caffeine (some won't).
    I've also used a mix that includes some protein which clearly Coke and Mountain Dew do not.

    The whole point I was making is that individual shared ingredients (including specific types of sugar (and even water!) will be identical. That's it. You can't extrapolate to saying two different drinks with different ingredients are "all the same".
    Well I can’t burp (at the risk of over-sharing here) so I would explode if I tried lifting after drinking coke 🤣 But lucozade sport is fine as it’s not fizzy 😀

    What sports drink do you use that has protein in it, or do you mix your own?

    @claireychn074

    High-5 do an energy drink mix which is 4 parts carbs to one part protein.
    Per bottle when cycling that gives me 105g of carbs and 27g of protein.

    Perhaps a bit low dosage of protein for your lifting workouts but when cycling I'm drinking multiple bottles.
    TBH I can't tell any difference compared to a more usual carb only mix. I bought it because it was on special offer!

    Wiggle sell it and full nutritional info is there -
    https://www.wiggle.co.uk/high5-energy-drink-with-protein-16kg-2
  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 32,491 Member
    glassyo wrote: »
    When I had the hiccups, to get rid of them I would down a spoonful of sugar and chug some water backwards out of a glass and it worked!

    That works without the sugar, BTW. Just thought I'd add that since it is a oh-noes sugar thread. :)

  • glassyo
    glassyo Posts: 6,668 Member
    glassyo wrote: »
    When I had the hiccups, to get rid of them I would down a spoonful of sugar and chug some water backwards out of a glass and it worked!

    That works without the sugar, BTW. Just thought I'd add that since it is a oh-noes sugar thread. :)

    Not in my world! 😁

    Actually, that's not true. I don't buy real sugar. I wonder if it would work with splenda. :)

    I really thought someone would question how to drink backwards out of a glass.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 25,692 Member
    glassyo wrote: »
    glassyo wrote: »
    When I had the hiccups, to get rid of them I would down a spoonful of sugar and chug some water backwards out of a glass and it worked!

    That works without the sugar, BTW. Just thought I'd add that since it is a oh-noes sugar thread. :)

    Not in my world! 😁

    Actually, that's not true. I don't buy real sugar. I wonder if it would work with splenda. :)

    I really thought someone would question how to drink backwards out of a glass.

    OK, this is from long-term memory so maybe flawed:

    Years back, there was research into the folk remedies for hiccups. The "swallow dry sugar" was one that tested out to be successful, above chance. I can't recall whether it was speculation, or further testing, but the thinking was that it was the granularity of the sugar creating (for lack of a better word) roughness/irritation that stimulated muscles or nerves inside the throat, and interrupted the hiccups.

    IF that's true, a powdery thing wouldn't wouldn't work, or maybe even something that melted faster in the throat than sugar does. I don't use the artificial sweeteners, but my impression is that some are more powdery than granular. Don't know about Splenda's texture, specifically.
  • glassyo
    glassyo Posts: 6,668 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    glassyo wrote: »
    glassyo wrote: »
    When I had the hiccups, to get rid of them I would down a spoonful of sugar and chug some water backwards out of a glass and it worked!

    That works without the sugar, BTW. Just thought I'd add that since it is a oh-noes sugar thread. :)

    Not in my world! 😁

    Actually, that's not true. I don't buy real sugar. I wonder if it would work with splenda. :)

    I really thought someone would question how to drink backwards out of a glass.

    OK, this is from long-term memory so maybe flawed:

    Years back, there was research into the folk remedies for hiccups. The "swallow dry sugar" was one that tested out to be successful, above chance. I can't recall whether it was speculation, or further testing, but the thinking was that it was the granularity of the sugar creating (for lack of a better word) roughness/irritation that stimulated muscles or nerves inside the throat, and interrupted the hiccups.

    IF that's true, a powdery thing wouldn't wouldn't work, or maybe even something that melted faster in the throat than sugar does. I don't use the artificial sweeteners, but my impression is that some are more powdery than granular. Don't know about Splenda's texture, specifically.

    Oh god, trying it with sweet n low just entered my mind and not even *I* like sweets that much.

    I wonder if that also ties into the scare tactic. Your breathing changes when you're scared and it throws a curve ball at the hiccups? I don't know. 😀

    Splenda has a granulated version, I think. I use the great value brand for my greek yogurt/cottage cheese/protein powder mix (depending on the greek yogurt used) and as a lower calorie cinnamon sugar topping for bread and it seems a touch more powdery than regular sugar.
  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 32,491 Member
    For me the opposite side of the glass thing is the only remedy that works for hiccups.

    It affects the palate and probably something in the throat. I've never had luck with just sugar.

    But now I want that cookie, @glassyo
  • COGypsy
    COGypsy Posts: 821 Member
    I don't want to brag, but I'm pretty sure I'm having very nutritious cookies this week. Pumpkin chocolate chip. You've got vegetables, anti-oxidants in the chocolate chips, all kinds of good stuff :D
  • springlering62
    springlering62 Posts: 5,433 Member
    Ooooh. You just reminded me I have one last Lazy Acres chocolate chip cookie in the freezer and I’m low on calories……a little bit of caloric serendipity.
  • ktilton70130
    ktilton70130 Posts: 203 Member
    the same with me. how do you feel? If you feel great and you are losing and/or maintaining your weight I would not focus to much on it.