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Looking for stepping up physical activity, open to suggestions and any help

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2

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  • ddsb1111
    ddsb1111 Posts: 845 Member
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    pbm89gt wrote: »
    Thanks, I think I'll just start walking and doing light stretching for now.

    I'm up about 100 lbs. right now. You, me, and all of us folks with an extra 100 lbs. are at heighten risk for lower limb injuries. You already mentioned lower extremity issues.

    My suggestion: don't injure yourself. Seriously. Don't think of exercise while 100 lbs overweight as a part of your weight loss efforts. "Yes" do exercise, do use you lower extremities, etc. Do all that, but right now set your #1 priority as "consistent-enjoyment."

    If you get worked up playing ping-pong, do that daily for a week or so. *kitten*? Yup, do it after work every day for a week or so. Figure out how to get a fun, active, routine. Doing fun active stuff consistently builds self-esteem, motivation, lowers depression, confidence, etc.

    As you lose more and more weight, more stuff will become available to you, and you'll already have the routine and consistency going.

    Just because you are spending :10 minutes a day playing hop-scotch (or whatever) while being 100 lbs overweight, doesn't mean you are screwing around. You are squarely on a good path that's leading to a healthy happy fit active place.

    Stretching, and walking maybe be fun for you, but if there is other fun stuff (particularly if it is a little social) mix that in.

    It’s so true! If we all found activities we love and are compelled to do we wouldn’t have to spend money on gyms or wear activity monitors I’d bet. Sometimes the simplest advice is the best advice and the advice most often ignored. And that’s not even mentioning the mental and emotional value it brings. So say it louder for the people in the back! 😊
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 10,036 Member
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    *kitten*?

    Ha! MPF censored the game where you stand outside, across from each other, and throw beanbags trying to get them into the hole on the slanted board.

    My guess was you were recommending . . . shall we say romantic activity ... as exercise.
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 10,036 Member
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    When i first started on MFP, after getting some scary numbers at a health screening, I just made a point of getting off the subway one stop early in the morning and walking to the farthest one I had time for in the evening.

    Then I added longish "destination" walks on the weekend -- to the library, a park, or a restaurant in a nearby urbanized area.

    Then I started turning on music and dancing around the living room.

    Finally, after about four months I joined a gym (after during a free trial to make sure it was a good fit). They had classes that interested me, a pool, and free weights, as well as cardio and strength training machines.

    But that's what worked for me. There are lots of paths, and the past one for you will depend on your interests, what's nearby, and your finances, among other things.
  • Pdc654
    Pdc654 Posts: 317 Member
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    What type of activity interests you? Doing something you enjoy or at least don't hate is the best exercise because you're more likely to stick with it. Your knee issues and being 100 lbs over weight do limit you however.

    I also was more than 100 lbs over weight when I started. I had joint pain as well but in particular back pain. I started by walking just a few minutes at a time several times throughout the day, then increasing it one minute everyday. I was very systematic about it. When I felt comfortable going back to the gym after getting vaccinated and boosted for covid, I returned to my water aerobic classes. Water classes are perfect for people with joint issues because the water takes all the pressure off the joints. I liked walking but I love my aqua aerobic classes.

    I have since lost those 100 lbs plus some. Keeping active was so important to me because it helped me feel better as I lost weight. My back pain and other joint issues have virtually disappeared now.
    As I lost the pounds I found I was able to do more intense activity. I have added weight training to my routine to help with muscle and bone retention.

    Start slow, find an activity you enjoy, and be consistent. You'll find as you lose weight, you'll also be able to do more and maybe even find other activities that you like.
  • gremloBBPT
    gremloBBPT Posts: 51 Member
    edited July 2023
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    I do best with activity that’s really convenient. For me, that’s been working more activity into my daily routine (so, things like walking or biking to work), working out at the gym if it’s nearby (like within a 5-10 min walk or at home), or using exercise vids.

    I was in the best shape of my life when I consistently did Beachbody workouts. That’s the company behind things like Insanity and P90. I didn’t do those, but I had other ones I rly loved. That phase lasted about 7 or so years for me. The results were fantastic—from a health/fitness standpoint and aesthetically. If you’re the sort who doesn’t need a gym habit to make exercise part of your routine, I highly rec workout vids/streaming them. It’s so damn convenient, and you can go at your own pace without any self-consciousness like can happen in public. Many of these workouts are expertly designed. I like that I can just turn my brain off and follow the lead of someone who knows what works and demonstrates the proper form.

    Beachbody goes by the name BODi now. I still have it but haven’t been streaming it anywhere near as consistently as I used to. They’re too hard for me right now. :( Once I lose about 15 pounds, I’ll get back to them. For now, I’m walking, bike riding, and doing easier vids. I also do some strength training with dumbbells at home, but not that much. I need to kick that up a notch. Overall, I think walking is the ideal exercise, especially when first re/starting on fitness. It’s especially nice if you have pleasant spots to safely walk. If that’s not possible for someone though, even walking on a treadmill can be an enjoyable habit if you can listen to or watch things you like during it. I used to work somewhere with a gym. Right after work, I’d walk for an hour while listening to podcasts. I actually ended up looking forward to that every day.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,745 Member
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    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I have some social anxiety and get being uncomfortable in new places. :blush:

    Every gym I've ever joined has given me 1-3 free sessions with a trainer. This is also a good way to get familiar and comfortable with the gym. Some gyms have also had small group classes for free or very inexpensive. I have taken advantage of this numerous times.

    I have pain in one ankle and a knee condition in my other leg. My physical therapist was really happy to hear I joined a gym. I like YMCAs because they often have overhead tracks and a pool. My ankle starts to hurt after 8 minutes of walking, so I walk for 5, recumbent bike for 5, row for 2, or elliptical for 2, then walk another 5, until I've done a total of 20 minutes of walking plus whatever.

    While I prefer getting cardio outside, this time of year it's just too hot for me, which is another advantage of the gym.

    I spent two years getting over an issue with my elbow, had 6 months of no pain, then fell on my wrist and have been dealing with that for almost two years. I've been afraid to start strength training again, but my physical therapist said I can, and should. So any day now I'm going to schedule that session with the trainer :smiley:

    Do start slowly, and slowly build up. In addition to the above, I've also started swimming, have always been doing yoga and my PT exercises, and now have pain in my hip when I stand or walk slowly. :disappointed: I'm frustrated.I think I'll back off the rowing, because it is the newest, and the elliptical, because I hate it.
    On your bad ankle have you ever gotten a foot imaging of how you stand on that foot? In other words is the main weight on the outside or inside of the foot?


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 35+ years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,745 Member
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    If you like the security of your own home, getting a stand up bag and a pair of gloves is a great way to start with cardio (since you're just using mostly your arms) and can gauge how hard you can go. Later if you lose enough weight and decide to add kicking, you kick up the intesity a notch.
    Try to find a used bag since the majority of people that bought them only used them sparingly and now they sit in their garage or spare room collecting dust. Many times I've done this, you get the bag for a fraction of the cost. A decent pair of gloves will cost you $30 at least. YOUTUBE has many beginning boxing tutorials that are easy to learn. You can only hit the bag so many ways so there's not a lot to learn on actual punches (jab, cross, hook, uppercut are the main punches). It's just your rhythym and intensity while you exercise that makes the difference in the workout at that point.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 35+ years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • xrj22
    xrj22 Posts: 199 Member
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    If you want something you can do at home, look on youtube for free workout videos. Hasfit are my favorites. They offer a lot of choices, and always have an intense and a modified version so you can suit it to your fitness level. Many require no equipment. There are also some with hand weights (pick the weight that is right for you).
  • xrj22
    xrj22 Posts: 199 Member
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    Also, if "exercise" doesn't sound fun, you might enjoy bicycling. Easy on the joints, and the scenery can be great.
  • ikalujny
    ikalujny Posts: 66 Member
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    A lot of great answers here.

    I have poorly healed hill bone fracture that lead to chronic problems, so running is not an option. But walking the stairs is an option, and that's what I do. I live in apartment building so stairs are readily available and free to use.
  • AntR95
    AntR95 Posts: 7 Member
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    Congratulations on the success so far. As for extra activities I would suggest just never resting. Keep going for walks, ride a bike on a trail, swimming laps, just always keep moving
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 28,028 Member
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    ninerbuff wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I have some social anxiety and get being uncomfortable in new places. :blush:

    Every gym I've ever joined has given me 1-3 free sessions with a trainer. This is also a good way to get familiar and comfortable with the gym. Some gyms have also had small group classes for free or very inexpensive. I have taken advantage of this numerous times.

    I have pain in one ankle and a knee condition in my other leg. My physical therapist was really happy to hear I joined a gym. I like YMCAs because they often have overhead tracks and a pool. My ankle starts to hurt after 8 minutes of walking, so I walk for 5, recumbent bike for 5, row for 2, or elliptical for 2, then walk another 5, until I've done a total of 20 minutes of walking plus whatever.

    While I prefer getting cardio outside, this time of year it's just too hot for me, which is another advantage of the gym.

    I spent two years getting over an issue with my elbow, had 6 months of no pain, then fell on my wrist and have been dealing with that for almost two years. I've been afraid to start strength training again, but my physical therapist said I can, and should. So any day now I'm going to schedule that session with the trainer :smiley:

    Do start slowly, and slowly build up. In addition to the above, I've also started swimming, have always been doing yoga and my PT exercises, and now have pain in my hip when I stand or walk slowly. :disappointed: I'm frustrated.I think I'll back off the rowing, because it is the newest, and the elliptical, because I hate it.
    On your bad ankle have you ever gotten a foot imaging of how you stand on that foot? In other words is the main weight on the outside or inside of the foot?


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 35+ years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    @ninerbuff no, my xray was with me lying down. I'll bring this up to my doctor, thanks.

  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 28,028 Member
    edited July 2023
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    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I have some social anxiety and get being uncomfortable in new places. :blush:

    Every gym I've ever joined has given me 1-3 free sessions with a trainer. This is also a good way to get familiar and comfortable with the gym. Some gyms have also had small group classes for free or very inexpensive. I have taken advantage of this numerous times.

    I have pain in one ankle and a knee condition in my other leg. My physical therapist was really happy to hear I joined a gym. I like YMCAs because they often have overhead tracks and a pool. My ankle starts to hurt after 8 minutes of walking, so I walk for 5, recumbent bike for 5, row for 2, or elliptical for 2, then walk another 5, until I've done a total of 20 minutes of walking plus whatever.

    While I prefer getting cardio outside, this time of year it's just too hot for me, which is another advantage of the gym.

    I spent two years getting over an issue with my elbow, had 6 months of no pain, then fell on my wrist and have been dealing with that for almost two years. I've been afraid to start strength training again, but my physical therapist said I can, and should. So any day now I'm going to schedule that session with the trainer :smiley:

    Do start slowly, and slowly build up. In addition to the above, I've also started swimming, have always been doing yoga and my PT exercises, and now have pain in my hip when I stand or walk slowly. :disappointed: I'm frustrated. I think I'll back off the rowing, because it is the newest, and the elliptical, because I hate it.

    I'm replying to my own post from last week.

    I stopped rowing last week, and my hip has been fine.

    But now even this walking routine is too much for my ankle :disappointed: Too much biking, and my knee starts to hurt.

    So I've been playing around with the elliptical, and realized it's not the elliptical itself that I hate, but I don't like it when my heart rate gets up into the 120s, which is does at my "natural" pace on the elliptical. My heart rate is under 100 on the bike. So I've been working to stay under 100 on the elliptical, and yesterday lasted 5 minutes. This may not sound like a lot, but at my faster speed 2 minutes was torture, so 5 minutes is a win in my book.
  • ReReNotMe
    ReReNotMe Posts: 63 Member
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    Hi not sure if anyone else has mentioned this but swimming is a great way to burn calories that is also low impact on joints and bones.

    I am a big fan of Olympic weightlifting and am lucky to be a part of my uni weightlifting society. I know it's easier said but gym bros are probably the most supportive people in the gym and weightlifting is a sport with people of many different body types so I've personally never felt out of place there even at my unhealthiest. I know not everyone has that around them but if you do, I can't recommend it enough.

    Also congrats on your journey so far. Progress is progress and you should be proud of what you've done so far. Good luck with your journey ahead :)
  • zebasschick
    zebasschick Posts: 1,067 Member
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    kshama2001 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I have some social anxiety and get being uncomfortable in new places. :blush:

    Every gym I've ever joined has given me 1-3 free sessions with a trainer. This is also a good way to get familiar and comfortable with the gym. Some gyms have also had small group classes for free or very inexpensive. I have taken advantage of this numerous times.

    I have pain in one ankle and a knee condition in my other leg. My physical therapist was really happy to hear I joined a gym. I like YMCAs because they often have overhead tracks and a pool. My ankle starts to hurt after 8 minutes of walking, so I walk for 5, recumbent bike for 5, row for 2, or elliptical for 2, then walk another 5, until I've done a total of 20 minutes of walking plus whatever.

    While I prefer getting cardio outside, this time of year it's just too hot for me, which is another advantage of the gym.

    I spent two years getting over an issue with my elbow, had 6 months of no pain, then fell on my wrist and have been dealing with that for almost two years. I've been afraid to start strength training again, but my physical therapist said I can, and should. So any day now I'm going to schedule that session with the trainer :smiley:

    Do start slowly, and slowly build up. In addition to the above, I've also started swimming, have always been doing yoga and my PT exercises, and now have pain in my hip when I stand or walk slowly. :disappointed: I'm frustrated. I think I'll back off the rowing, because it is the newest, and the elliptical, because I hate it.

    I'm replying to my own post from last week.

    I stopped rowing last week, and my hip has been fine.

    But now even this walking routine is too much for my ankle :disappointed: Too much biking, and my knee starts to hurt.

    So I've been playing around with the elliptical, and realized it's not the elliptical itself that I hate, but I don't like it when my heart rate gets up into the 120s, which is does at my "natural" pace on the elliptical. My heart rate is under 100 on the bike. So I've been working to stay under 100 on the elliptical, and yesterday lasted 5 minutes. This may not sound like a lot, but at my faster speed 2 minutes was torture, so 5 minutes is a win in my book.

    i have to brace my knees and ankles when i ride my exercise bike (at low resistance), do stairs or an aerobic step workout. i also use 2 exercise bikes - 1 semi-recumbent and one upright, and switching between them seems to spare my knees. so does changing position on the semi-recumbent. believe it or not, i used to also have a recumbent, and when anything would start to get uncomfortable, i'd switch from bike to bike. sounds silly, but it got my riding time up without harming my knees, ankles or some other issues.

    i found ellipticals were harder on my knees and ankles, but of course, we're all different and so are our injuries and weaker areas.
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 9,625 Member
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    I don't go to a gym because I hate the blinking screens, terrible music and having to wait for the proper weights. I do cardio outside: cycling, running, hiking, depending on place I live (it changes frequently) swimming or inline skating. And I do bodyweight exercises with a good floormat, some kettlebells and whatever I can do with my wee barbell and bench.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 33,010 Member
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    pbm89gt wrote: »
    Wow! Haven't checked this post in awhile. Thanks for all the great advice! A little update I'm now 60lbs down and developed some lower back pain. The Dr ordered a MRI and found I have a degenerative disc and Arthritis, so I'm doing physical therapy for 8 weeks. I only started yesterday so they're working on stretching to break up the inflammation and strengthen my core.
    I've also stepped up my activity by trying not to be a couch potato 😂. Cleaning out closets and donating tons of clothes, rearranging kitchen cabinets, basically anything to keep active on the weekends. I'm starting slow but they say slow and steady wind the race, well I hope they are right. 😁 Thanks again for all the suggestions.

    If we're talking health, weight management, or fitness improvement, it's 100% true that patient persistence and steady, gradual progress are where the magic happens. That's my personal experience, anyway.