Intermittent Fasting

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  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 13,332 Member
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    @paperpudding

    I only mentioned seafood because I have a suspicion that some people who squirm at the idea of eating an adult insect or larvae or a spider might also drool at the thought of devouring another member of the
    phylum arthropoda like a lobster or a shrimp cocktail. I expect some people don't recognize that they are very close relatives.

    The truth is that even I am squeamish about eating insects even though I know in my brain that I shouldn't be. I want to get past this because I really do believe that eating insects would be a good thing for us humans to do as well as reduce our consumption of some other animals.
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 9,014 Member
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    Tara - yes I am agreeing with you.

    Our western food culture accepts things like prawns but squirms at cockroaches or witchetty grubs.

    But the idea espoused by one poster that humans can't digest insects is clearly incorrect. It is just cultural preference, that's all.

  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 27,951 Member
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    Aesop101 wrote: »
    I'm not eating insects (intentionally). Animals that eat insects have developed a way to digest them and as far as I know humans haven't. Let the WHO eat them. That'll be a great way to keep them at bey.
    But in parts of Asia eating insects is common - indigenous Australians pre arrival of Europeans too - and I suspect many other hunter/gatherer societies.
    Would be unlikely to be such widespread practice if humans could not digest them

    Yes, my ex boss is Thai and went to Thailand at least once per year. He showed us a picture of big chafing trays full of some sort of insect. While looking for a similar picture I found this video of a bug market in Thailand.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jy5pBI8WvK8&ab_channel=darrenb3

    "I taste test all the edible bugs at an insect shop at a market in Krabi Thailand – grasshoppers, grubs, silk worms, meal worms and crickets. And I can tell you that they taste pretty good! Edible insects are a common snack in Thailand and a popular Thai street food."
  • sollyn23l2
    sollyn23l2 Posts: 1,635 Member
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    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Aesop101 wrote: »
    I'm not eating insects (intentionally). Animals that eat insects have developed a way to digest them and as far as I know humans haven't. Let the WHO eat them. That'll be a great way to keep them at bey.
    But in parts of Asia eating insects is common - indigenous Australians pre arrival of Europeans too - and I suspect many other hunter/gatherer societies.
    Would be unlikely to be such widespread practice if humans could not digest them

    Yes, my ex boss is Thai and went to Thailand at least once per year. He showed us a picture of big chafing trays full of some sort of insect. While looking for a similar picture I found this video of a bug market in Thailand.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jy5pBI8WvK8&ab_channel=darrenb3

    "I taste test all the edible bugs at an insect shop at a market in Krabi Thailand – grasshoppers, grubs, silk worms, meal worms and crickets. And I can tell you that they taste pretty good! Edible insects are a common snack in Thailand and a popular Thai street food."

    Yep. And when I lived in Mexico people ate scorpions.
  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 9,957 Member
    edited March 14
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    mtaratoot wrote: »
    Aesop101 wrote: »
    I'm not eating insects (intentionally). Animals that eat insects have developed a way to digest them and as far as I know humans haven't. Let the WHO eat them. That'll be a great way to keep them at bey.


    You are mistaken.

    Humans evolved eating insects. It might have been that the protein that insects provided allowed humans to evolve at all. Even the story of the exodus of the ancient Isrealites from Egypt has references to eating insects. One of the ten plagues was locusts. When that plague was over, the locusts were blown out to sea rather than just fall on the ground. Had they fallen on the ground, the Egyptians would have feasted on them. The dietary laws outlined in Leviticus allows certain insects. Many people believe that "manna from heaven" was locusts.

    Humans have a long history of eating insects, and our bodies have no problem digesting them. Lots of people eat crab, lobster, or shrimp. These are essentially sea insects.


    Yeah, I agree and the last time I checked we are animals and insects are probably closer to our species appropriate diet than donuts are. :D
  • Aesop101
    Aesop101 Posts: 758 Member
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    Back to fasting. I have to fast all day today and until 1pm tomorrow for a procedure I'm having tomorrow.
  • musicfan68
    musicfan68 Posts: 1,126 Member
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    Wow, talk about changing subjects on a thread.

    I naturally do intermittent fasting as it works for my schedule. It also lets me eat a large, satisfying supper.
  • Aesop101
    Aesop101 Posts: 758 Member
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    I've been fasting quite a bit. My goal is to get rid of diabetes and from what I've seen that's a big part of the cure. Fasted 18 hours today. I had a CT Scan this morning. Last Saturday through Monday I fasted 45 hours. My blood sugar dropped into the normal range, 105 and 106. That shows it's possible. I imagine some stored energy was pulled from the liver. At least I hope so.

    Any insights and experiences are more than welcome.
  • LinsClarke2202
    LinsClarke2202 Posts: 1 Member
    edited April 2
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    This dr is right. But the point of fasting is to get into a calorie deficit. So intermittent fasting works.
    Further I saw a video of a Dr saying that a 36:12 burns belly fat specifically.
  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 9,957 Member
    edited April 2
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    Further I saw a video of a Dr saying that a 36:12burns belly fat specifically.
    I believe the Dr. might be suffering from a "brain cloud" and a sea voyage to the volcanic Island of Waponi Woo might be the only remedy, just kidding. :D

    Anyway, a 36 hour "alternate day fast" will burn adipose tissue for energy, and yes, some will be belly fat but it's not specifically just belly fat, that's not how it works and this happens anytime our energy reserves dip into our adipose and not just during a fast.

  • Aesop101
    Aesop101 Posts: 758 Member
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    That visceral fat is stubborn.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 32,382 Member
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    Aesop101 wrote: »
    That visceral fat is stubborn.

    Visceral fat is on the inside of the body cavity, around the organs. IMU, it will often be among the first and easiest fat to be lost. That's a good thing, since it has some of the worst impact on health.

    Someone who has a lot of visceral fat may have some protruding belly from it pushing out from the inside . . . but usually what people call "belly fat" (or a pooch or the like) is fat on the abdomen, between the skin and the abdominal muscles, exterior to the body cavity. If it's there, it would be subcutaneous fat, not visceral fat.

    The exterior abdominal fat is often the last to go, for many people . . . in that sense, it may be considered stubborn. Some people won't be able to lose all they wish of it without other parts of their body looking/being too thin.
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 9,014 Member
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    This dr is right. But the point of fasting is to get into a calorie deficit. So intermittent fasting works.
    Further I saw a video of a Dr saying that a 36:12 burns belly fat specifically.

    The point of fasting seems to vary according to who is doing it, religious reasons etc

    However intermittent fasting, as far as working to lose weight goes, only gets you into a calorie deficit if you eat less than you burn - exactly the same as getting into a calorie deficit without intermittent fasting.
  • ddsb1111
    ddsb1111 Posts: 810 Member
    edited April 3
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    I know one person in my life who does them as a substitute/self-treatment for her binge eating and she's always bouncing between euphoria and severe depression. It's dangerous, and addictive and I can clearly see from the outside how miserable she is all the time.

    This is why I recommend taking it slow when starting IF. I even consider 16/8 too much for most people at the beginning. It takes time to physically and mentally adapt to something as extreme as not eating for long periods of time.

    I find if you’re all or nothing with dieting, then you’re likely going to be all or nothing with IF, and they’re both a recipe for disaster. It can be a tool for weight loss, or another tool for disordered eating, but it’s certainly not a cure for either one.

    For the amount of people that misuse IF it’s a shame we don’t have a more active IF board to redirect and help more people faster. I’d be pinning stickies constantly. With YT being the “expert” it’s no wonder it’s like herding cats around here.
  • Aesop101
    Aesop101 Posts: 758 Member
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    PAV8888 wrote: »
    You may hate me. Or think that I am an MFP meanie.

    But seriously @Aesop101 please take the time to go talk to a registered dietitian or someone who works with your board certified physician to provide you with health advice.

    You are 70 years old. 40 days ago you posted that you discovered Dr Fung and fasting and you are now talking about 45 hour and 18 hour fasts. 40 days in and already performing two day fasts is, at the very least... fast.

    Visceral fat is the FIRST to go from around your organs. It is not visible--your visible belly fat is subcutaneous. Too many fasts and too little protein can have actual organ failure implications.

    It's your organs... not mine. But I remind you that just because someone "feels" good it doesn't mean that they are objectively performing good! Remember back in the day when tipsy people felt "great" and "alert" and were "ready to drive" while everyone around them was arguing that they shouldn't?

    Sometimes feeling good means you're doing good. Sometimes it doesn't.

    But from where I am sitting, maybe I am wrong, but from where I am sitting, it SOUNDS like you are engaging in some serious self medical management based on less than stellar sources of information. And you are doing this while in the process of trying to manage more than one health problem if one assumes that CAT scans are not for fun.

    Don't be like an older friend of mine who only takes her blood pressure pills when she "feels like it", thus self managing herself into an early grave. Talk with your doctor and discuss IN FULL what you're doing.

    Take care.

    I appreciate your sincerity and it's very well written. I've found dieticians still pull out the food pyramid and the divided plate. The food pyramid should be retired. It was a marketing scheme promoted by only one man. The divided plate is terrible for us diabetics. They have one third of the plate just for carbs. The woman that is the director of nutrition at the American Diabetes association is obese! As one guy noted, it looks like she's following her own advice.

    I've seen several videos of people talking about diabetes. Fasting seems to be a common technique. The 45 hours I fasted was for a colonoscopy. Much of that was drinking some type of colon cleanse or swill as I call it. There's a channel out there called "Beating Diabetes", it's worth the watch.

    I'm not depressed in the slightest. I would ask your friend is she getting enough protein. Being a vegetarian will mess you up physically and mentally.

    Finally, my A1C had dropped to 6.3 from 14.7. My doctor was elated. She had a note to put me on insulin and tore it up in front of me.

    You are right about visceral fat, it does surround your organs deep in your belly.

    I fasted 18 hours today and made it to the wellness center to work out. Very last thing, fasting has happened all throughout history. It's part of our make up for survival.

    I still like your post though, well written and sincere.
  • PAV8888
    PAV8888 Posts: 13,724 Member
    edited April 6
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    I am definitely glad your A1C has dropped down into the pre-diabetic range; i.e. heading in the right direction! :smiley:

    UGH: the swill!