Thought I'd picked a healthy breakfast option ...

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Replies

  • myfelinepal
    myfelinepal Posts: 13,000 Member
    Buy the plain Fage, and then put in your own fruit, jam, whatever
    . That's what I do. By the by, I also now buy 2%, and I like it alot more. B)

    Both of which contain sugar...

    TEH SUGARZ!
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,295 Member
    I don't really get the "sugar ohnoes"....I'm actually having a cherry pomegranate Fage greek yogurt cup right now along with my pile of scrambled eggs. I consider it a pretty healthy breakfast. Carbs and protein in the AM are my friend.

    If you're concerned about the calories, 184 calories isn't a lot of calories...to boot, calories are not an indicator of whether or not something is healthy.
  • goddessofawesome
    goddessofawesome Posts: 563 Member
    I'm not a fan of the yogurts that have added fruits, honey etc. in them. They're too sweet for me,

    I make my own yogurt and I'll either have it straight up plain or I'll add a touch of honey, homemade jam or the like (and by a "touch" I mean one, maybe two teaspoons. Just enough for a touch of sweet but not overpowering).
  • Zara11
    Zara11 Posts: 1,247 Member
    get the total, throw in two servings or so of fruit - keeps me full for a long time! one of my favorite breakfasts. yes, there's sugar, but is it an effective meal for you?
  • enterdanger
    enterdanger Posts: 2,447 Member
    I bought the 4% greek yogurt made from whole milk on accident once and refuse to go back down to nonfat now. I buy the plain yogurt and add my own honey and fruit to help control the sugar. Keep in mind, yogurt will always have sugar even if you buy the plain kind because milk has sugar. Not all the sugar is "added sugar" which is what most people are concerned with.
  • ndj1979
    ndj1979 Posts: 29,145 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    I don't really get the "sugar ohnoes"....I'm actually having a cherry pomegranate Fage greek yogurt cup right now along with my pile of scrambled eggs. I consider it a pretty healthy breakfast. Carbs and protein in the AM are my friend.

    If you're concerned about the calories, 184 calories isn't a lot of calories...to boot, calories are not an indicator of whether or not something is healthy.

    apparently sugar is the antichrist....
  • ndj1979
    ndj1979 Posts: 29,145 Member
    Sweets1954 wrote: »
    You should be getting closer to 350 calories for a meal.

    what?! no!

    how can you give a number of calories that a meal should be when you know nothing about the OPs eating patterns or calorie goal?

    according to another thread op is on 1200 a day calorie limit.
  • Jolinia
    Jolinia Posts: 846 Member
    The WHO says find a different breakfast.

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTGoCIhHFlq3SU91Ce0TIozMIdpUGqfeNxDNP1CgzY6Xja_9Em2Yw

    http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/notes/2014/consultation-sugar-guideline/en/

    WHO’s current recommendation, from 2002, is that sugars should make up less than 10% of total energy intake per day. The new draft guideline also proposes that sugars should be less than 10% of total energy intake per day. It further suggests that a reduction to below 5% of total energy intake per day would have additional benefits. Five per cent of total energy intake is equivalent to around 25 grams (around 6 teaspoons) of sugar per day for an adult of normal Body Mass Index (BMI).



  • rainbowbow
    rainbowbow Posts: 7,491 Member
    edited February 2015
    Table_grapes_on_white.jpg

    1 serving (126g) Is 88 calories and.... *GASP* 20g of sugar!

    My point is... you shouldn't demonize the food you just ate. I mean come on, you had yogurt WITH HONEY are you really suprised by the "sugar content" when you were adding straight honey to the yogurt?

    I know fage has plain 0% or plain 2% yogurt that are by themselves without the little flavoring cup on the side. Maybe try those next time if you absolutely cannot have sugar due to some health reason.
  • ndj1979
    ndj1979 Posts: 29,145 Member
    edited February 2015
    Jolinia wrote: »
    The WHO says find a different breakfast.

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTGoCIhHFlq3SU91Ce0TIozMIdpUGqfeNxDNP1CgzY6Xja_9Em2Yw

    http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/notes/2014/consultation-sugar-guideline/en/

    WHO’s current recommendation, from 2002, is that sugars should make up less than 10% of total energy intake per day. The new draft guideline also proposes that sugars should be less than 10% of total energy intake per day. It further suggests that a reduction to below 5% of total energy intake per day would have additional benefits. Five per cent of total energy intake is equivalent to around 25 grams (around 6 teaspoons) of sugar per day for an adult of normal Body Mass Index (BMI).



    LOL no ...

    ETA

    I decided to click the link and they give no background as to how they come up with this number, but here is a snippet from their opening

    "Free sugars contribute to the overall energy density of diets. Ensuring energy balance is critical to maintaining healthy body weight and ensuring optimal nutrient intake."

    ^ ground breaking stuff. Guess what, proteins and fats also contribute to the overall energy density of diets...

  • rainbowbow
    rainbowbow Posts: 7,491 Member
    Jolinia wrote: »
    The WHO says find a different breakfast.

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTGoCIhHFlq3SU91Ce0TIozMIdpUGqfeNxDNP1CgzY6Xja_9Em2Yw

    http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/notes/2014/consultation-sugar-guideline/en/

    WHO’s current recommendation, from 2002, is that sugars should make up less than 10% of total energy intake per day. The new draft guideline also proposes that sugars should be less than 10% of total energy intake per day. It further suggests that a reduction to below 5% of total energy intake per day would have additional benefits. Five per cent of total energy intake is equivalent to around 25 grams (around 6 teaspoons) of sugar per day for an adult of normal Body Mass Index (BMI).

    The suggested limits on intake of sugars in the draft guideline apply to all monosaccharides (such as glucose, fructose) and disaccharides (such as sucrose or table sugar) that are added to food by the manufacturer, the cook or the consumer, as well as sugars that are naturally present in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit concentrates.

    Well, let's just get that straight.
  • Jolinia
    Jolinia Posts: 846 Member
    rainbowbow wrote: »
    Jolinia wrote: »
    The WHO says find a different breakfast.

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTGoCIhHFlq3SU91Ce0TIozMIdpUGqfeNxDNP1CgzY6Xja_9Em2Yw

    http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/notes/2014/consultation-sugar-guideline/en/

    WHO’s current recommendation, from 2002, is that sugars should make up less than 10% of total energy intake per day. The new draft guideline also proposes that sugars should be less than 10% of total energy intake per day. It further suggests that a reduction to below 5% of total energy intake per day would have additional benefits. Five per cent of total energy intake is equivalent to around 25 grams (around 6 teaspoons) of sugar per day for an adult of normal Body Mass Index (BMI).

    The suggested limits on intake of sugars in the draft guideline apply to all monosaccharides (such as glucose, fructose) and disaccharides (such as sucrose or table sugar) that are added to food by the manufacturer, the cook or the consumer, as well as sugars that are naturally present in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit concentrates.

    Well, let's just get that straight.

    Thanks, I should have put that in there. I was too busy cracking a joke to be thorough!

    Either way, I know I feel better when I listen to The WHO.
  • HeySwoleSister
    HeySwoleSister Posts: 1,938 Member
    That Fage greek yogurt with honey?

    SO FRICKIN DELICIOUS. It's like living in a BEE'S BRAIN. Only with protein and calcium. 10/10 will eat again.

    What's this about a poor choice again? That's crazy talk.
  • So while its not always best to eat packaged sweetened yogurt (better to add it yourself, probably have less sugar), its not really that big of a deal. That sugar is looking at natural and added sugar. This is why it should be separated out (into natural and added sugar). It is accounting for lactose, which is a sugar. In regular nonfat, unsweetened milk, in a cup there is 12 grams of sugar... It's really only bad if its added sugar
  • Jolinia
    Jolinia Posts: 846 Member
    So while its not always best to eat packaged sweetened yogurt (better to add it yourself, probably have less sugar), its not really that big of a deal. That sugar is looking at natural and added sugar. This is why it should be separated out (into natural and added sugar). It is accounting for lactose, which is a sugar. In regular nonfat, unsweetened milk, in a cup there is 12 grams of sugar... It's really only bad if its added sugar

    It should be on all labels, but the packaged food industry went nuts and lobbied to ensure it wouldn't be separated out. They claimed that if they had to put the different types of sugar on the package, their competitors could copy their product.
  • auddii
    auddii Posts: 15,357 Member
    So while its not always best to eat packaged sweetened yogurt (better to add it yourself, probably have less sugar), its not really that big of a deal. That sugar is looking at natural and added sugar. This is why it should be separated out (into natural and added sugar). It is accounting for lactose, which is a sugar. In regular nonfat, unsweetened milk, in a cup there is 12 grams of sugar... It's really only bad if its added sugar
    So if I buy the yogurt that you fold the container in half to dump in the fruit or honey (depending on which you buy), is that "added sugar"?
  • ndj1979
    ndj1979 Posts: 29,145 Member
    So while its not always best to eat packaged sweetened yogurt (better to add it yourself, probably have less sugar), its not really that big of a deal. That sugar is looking at natural and added sugar. This is why it should be separated out (into natural and added sugar). It is accounting for lactose, which is a sugar. In regular nonfat, unsweetened milk, in a cup there is 12 grams of sugar... It's really only bad if its added sugar

    ahhh yes the evil added sugars....your body does not distinguish between added sugar and natural sugar it is all the same at the molecular level....
  • ndj1979
    ndj1979 Posts: 29,145 Member
    auddii wrote: »
    So while its not always best to eat packaged sweetened yogurt (better to add it yourself, probably have less sugar), its not really that big of a deal. That sugar is looking at natural and added sugar. This is why it should be separated out (into natural and added sugar). It is accounting for lactose, which is a sugar. In regular nonfat, unsweetened milk, in a cup there is 12 grams of sugar... It's really only bad if its added sugar
    So if I buy the yogurt that you fold the container in half to dump in the fruit or honey (depending on which you buy), is that "added sugar"?

    no because honey is good, so that would be OK..

    Now, if you add table sugar to the yogurt it is then "bad"...

    you really need to get these rules down ...:)
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,465 Member
    I'm on 1650 calories a day, full snacking, and I try and get between 300 to 500 calories in for breakfast. 180 calories is not concerning other than you will be hungry soon. If you want to up the protein, ditch the honey and add an egg.
  • auddii
    auddii Posts: 15,357 Member
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    auddii wrote: »
    So while its not always best to eat packaged sweetened yogurt (better to add it yourself, probably have less sugar), its not really that big of a deal. That sugar is looking at natural and added sugar. This is why it should be separated out (into natural and added sugar). It is accounting for lactose, which is a sugar. In regular nonfat, unsweetened milk, in a cup there is 12 grams of sugar... It's really only bad if its added sugar
    So if I buy the yogurt that you fold the container in half to dump in the fruit or honey (depending on which you buy), is that "added sugar"?

    no because honey is good, so that would be OK..

    Now, if you add table sugar to the yogurt it is then "bad"...

    you really need to get these rules down ...:)

    Argh. I thought for sure I was on the right track. Add sugar to yogurt = added sugar. But no, that's crazy talk!

    Has someone started a rules thread yet because this is just too confusing?! I need a spread sheet...