Thought I'd picked a healthy breakfast option ...

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Replies

  • WinoGelato
    WinoGelato Posts: 13,456 Member
    auddii wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    auddii wrote: »
    So while its not always best to eat packaged sweetened yogurt (better to add it yourself, probably have less sugar), its not really that big of a deal. That sugar is looking at natural and added sugar. This is why it should be separated out (into natural and added sugar). It is accounting for lactose, which is a sugar. In regular nonfat, unsweetened milk, in a cup there is 12 grams of sugar... It's really only bad if its added sugar
    So if I buy the yogurt that you fold the container in half to dump in the fruit or honey (depending on which you buy), is that "added sugar"?

    no because honey is good, so that would be OK..

    Now, if you add table sugar to the yogurt it is then "bad"...

    you really need to get these rules down ...:)

    Argh. I thought for sure I was on the right track. Add sugar to yogurt = added sugar. But no, that's crazy talk!

    Has someone started a rules thread yet because this is just too confusing?! I need a spread sheet...

    OMG a visio flow chart with rules for whether or not a food is good or bad. Why didn't we think of this sooner!? We will be rich, rich I tell you!
  • auddii
    auddii Posts: 15,357 Member
    emily_stew wrote: »
    Kruggeri wrote: »
    auddii wrote: »
    So while its not always best to eat packaged sweetened yogurt (better to add it yourself, probably have less sugar), its not really that big of a deal. That sugar is looking at natural and added sugar. This is why it should be separated out (into natural and added sugar). It is accounting for lactose, which is a sugar. In regular nonfat, unsweetened milk, in a cup there is 12 grams of sugar... It's really only bad if its added sugar
    So if I buy the yogurt that you fold the container in half to dump in the fruit or honey (depending on which you buy), is that "added sugar"?

    Is that how you are supposed to do that? Fold the container in half? Jeebus I feel stupid. I have been trying to scoop it from the dry side into the yogurt side with my spoon and making a heck of a mess in the process....

    I just fold it over, though I also end up making a mess either way.

    I think they were designed to just piss people off. Of course, I eat one with even more evil - artificial sweeteners. I love the lite and fit greek vanilla...
  • ndj1979
    ndj1979 Posts: 29,145 Member
    Jolinia wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    Jolinia wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    Jolinia wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    So while its not always best to eat packaged sweetened yogurt (better to add it yourself, probably have less sugar), its not really that big of a deal. That sugar is looking at natural and added sugar. This is why it should be separated out (into natural and added sugar). It is accounting for lactose, which is a sugar. In regular nonfat, unsweetened milk, in a cup there is 12 grams of sugar... It's really only bad if its added sugar

    ahhh yes the evil added sugars....your body does not distinguish between added sugar and natural sugar it is all the same at the molecular level....

    Really? My body has no clue when I eat fructose with or without fiber? And it has no clue about the differences between fructose, glucose, and lactose?

    If you're right, I'm wasting my time. If you're incorrect, then I should know any differences, too, and food labels should differentiate for us.

    are sugar molecules different?

    Does the liver treat different sugars differently or not? Does the digestive system act different in any way when we eat high fiber with fructose than when we don't?

    so by that logic if I add table sugar to Metamucil it is then bad because added sugar, or is it good because fiber???

    You will never answer my questions, will you?

    well you moved the goal posts and never answered mine..so consider us even.
  • silver_arrow3
    silver_arrow3 Posts: 1,373 Member
    rainbowbow wrote: »
    Table_grapes_on_white.jpg

    1 serving (126g) Is 88 calories and.... *GASP* 20g of sugar!

    My point is... you shouldn't demonize the food you just ate. I mean come on, you had yogurt WITH HONEY are you really suprised by the "sugar content" when you were adding straight honey to the yogurt?

    I know fage has plain 0% or plain 2% yogurt that are by themselves without the little flavoring cup on the side. Maybe try those next time if you absolutely cannot have sugar due to some health reason.
    This.

    When I buy the ones with honey in them (always the 2% because it's just so much creamier than the 0%), I only use the amount of honey I actually want in my yogurt. If the whole thing is too sweet (which for me, it is), I only use a spoonful and leave the rest, or, since I've already logged it, add it to my morning tea.
  • Ninkyou
    Ninkyou Posts: 6,666 Member
    emily_stew wrote: »
    Kruggeri wrote: »
    auddii wrote: »
    So while its not always best to eat packaged sweetened yogurt (better to add it yourself, probably have less sugar), its not really that big of a deal. That sugar is looking at natural and added sugar. This is why it should be separated out (into natural and added sugar). It is accounting for lactose, which is a sugar. In regular nonfat, unsweetened milk, in a cup there is 12 grams of sugar... It's really only bad if its added sugar
    So if I buy the yogurt that you fold the container in half to dump in the fruit or honey (depending on which you buy), is that "added sugar"?

    Is that how you are supposed to do that? Fold the container in half? Jeebus I feel stupid. I have been trying to scoop it from the dry side into the yogurt side with my spoon and making a heck of a mess in the process....

    I just fold it over, though I also end up making a mess either way.

    I thought you were supposed to like... dollar bill snort it. Well... shows you what I know. :|
    Back to the drawing board.
  • Jolinia
    Jolinia Posts: 846 Member
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    Jolinia wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    Jolinia wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    Jolinia wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    So while its not always best to eat packaged sweetened yogurt (better to add it yourself, probably have less sugar), its not really that big of a deal. That sugar is looking at natural and added sugar. This is why it should be separated out (into natural and added sugar). It is accounting for lactose, which is a sugar. In regular nonfat, unsweetened milk, in a cup there is 12 grams of sugar... It's really only bad if its added sugar

    ahhh yes the evil added sugars....your body does not distinguish between added sugar and natural sugar it is all the same at the molecular level....

    Really? My body has no clue when I eat fructose with or without fiber? And it has no clue about the differences between fructose, glucose, and lactose?

    If you're right, I'm wasting my time. If you're incorrect, then I should know any differences, too, and food labels should differentiate for us.

    are sugar molecules different?

    Does the liver treat different sugars differently or not? Does the digestive system act different in any way when we eat high fiber with fructose than when we don't?

    so by that logic if I add table sugar to Metamucil it is then bad because added sugar, or is it good because fiber???

    You will never answer my questions, will you?

    well you moved the goal posts and never answered mine..so consider us even.

    So either you don't know the answer or don't want to answer. Gotcha. Even steven, won't waste any more time asking you.
  • ndj1979
    ndj1979 Posts: 29,145 Member
    Jolinia wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    Jolinia wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    Jolinia wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    Jolinia wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    So while its not always best to eat packaged sweetened yogurt (better to add it yourself, probably have less sugar), its not really that big of a deal. That sugar is looking at natural and added sugar. This is why it should be separated out (into natural and added sugar). It is accounting for lactose, which is a sugar. In regular nonfat, unsweetened milk, in a cup there is 12 grams of sugar... It's really only bad if its added sugar

    ahhh yes the evil added sugars....your body does not distinguish between added sugar and natural sugar it is all the same at the molecular level....

    Really? My body has no clue when I eat fructose with or without fiber? And it has no clue about the differences between fructose, glucose, and lactose?

    If you're right, I'm wasting my time. If you're incorrect, then I should know any differences, too, and food labels should differentiate for us.

    are sugar molecules different?

    Does the liver treat different sugars differently or not? Does the digestive system act different in any way when we eat high fiber with fructose than when we don't?

    so by that logic if I add table sugar to Metamucil it is then bad because added sugar, or is it good because fiber???

    You will never answer my questions, will you?

    well you moved the goal posts and never answered mine..so consider us even.

    So either you don't know the answer or don't want to answer. Gotcha. Even steven, won't waste any more time asking you.

    LOL how ironic...

    the feeling is mutual.

  • goddessofawesome
    goddessofawesome Posts: 563 Member
    You can make alot of your own "healthier" versions of granola bars or cookies by using fruit purees or vegetable purees in your baking and staying away from honeys, agave or other sweeteners instead of placing your faith in whatever snack some huge corporation MARKETED as "healthy" that's packed with garbage like high fructose corn syrup, refined sugars or whatever else they put in there. You can satisfy your sweet tooth without buying stuff that's sweetened to the nth degree for you.

    But . . .. but the HFCS and sugar in those foods "makes it taste better!"

    Yeah, right. IMO there is no need to have HFCS or added sugar in my blue cheese dressing or my spaghetti sauce (hence the reason I make my own). It tastes much better without it.

  • Athijade
    Athijade Posts: 2,952 Member

    I've never seen a single person on MFP claim you should "eat whatever you want" or "who cares." I've seen a lot of people make the true statement that all that matters for weight loss is a calorie deficit. However, none of those people advocate eating nothing but Twinkies, and most of those people get the bulk of their calories from nutritionally dense food. They very much care about their macros and micros. However, they also eat sugar in reasonable amounts, because it fits within their goals, and they're not eating it at an unhealthy dosage. Oh, and the people I assume you're referring to know a ton about nutrition and biochemistry. I learn a lot reading what they post.

    The articles you linked don't prove sugar is bad - the first is written by someone who pulls what he wants from inconclusive studies to fearmonger, and on several points he's straight-up wrong. The WebMD article mentions research investigating a possible link between cholestoral and sugar, but nothing is proven yet. It also says MULTIPLE TIMES that the problem is overconsumption of CALORIES, not sugar. And the third one isn't a peer-reviewed study and doesn't have sources, so...no.

    Sugar is not bad. Fact. Sugar is a neutral entity. It is unhealthy to overconsume it, but sugar is not unhealthy on its own. There's no reason to demonize it. Just eat it in moderation and at an appropriate dosage, as you should with anything.

    You... you are smart and awesome and all of that good stuff. *High Five*!
  • gothchiq
    gothchiq Posts: 4,592 Member
    You can make alot of your own "healthier" versions of granola bars or cookies by using fruit purees or vegetable purees in your baking and staying away from honeys, agave or other sweeteners instead of placing your faith in whatever snack some huge corporation MARKETED as "healthy" that's packed with garbage like high fructose corn syrup, refined sugars or whatever else they put in there. You can satisfy your sweet tooth without buying stuff that's sweetened to the nth degree for you.

    I just found out I'm diabetic. I have to relearn how to choose foods now. :( Man, this blows. I need to find out which fruits and vegetables are still okay and which I need to ditch.
  • Jolinia
    Jolinia Posts: 846 Member
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    Jolinia wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    Jolinia wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    Jolinia wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    Jolinia wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    So while its not always best to eat packaged sweetened yogurt (better to add it yourself, probably have less sugar), its not really that big of a deal. That sugar is looking at natural and added sugar. This is why it should be separated out (into natural and added sugar). It is accounting for lactose, which is a sugar. In regular nonfat, unsweetened milk, in a cup there is 12 grams of sugar... It's really only bad if its added sugar

    ahhh yes the evil added sugars....your body does not distinguish between added sugar and natural sugar it is all the same at the molecular level....

    Really? My body has no clue when I eat fructose with or without fiber? And it has no clue about the differences between fructose, glucose, and lactose?

    If you're right, I'm wasting my time. If you're incorrect, then I should know any differences, too, and food labels should differentiate for us.

    are sugar molecules different?

    Does the liver treat different sugars differently or not? Does the digestive system act different in any way when we eat high fiber with fructose than when we don't?

    so by that logic if I add table sugar to Metamucil it is then bad because added sugar, or is it good because fiber???

    You will never answer my questions, will you?

    well you moved the goal posts and never answered mine..so consider us even.

    So either you don't know the answer or don't want to answer. Gotcha. Even steven, won't waste any more time asking you.

    LOL how ironic...

    the feeling is mutual.

    Back to struggling through lectures designed for researchers and medical professionals/students, then. I hope the next 'fad' diet is a hepatic health diet so that maybe some experts will get together and put all the research info available as of now into something the rest of us can learn and apply. I care as much or more now about the fat on my liver as I do the fat on my hips. And obviously I won't get straight answers around here regarding that.
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,465 Member
    I made a table of sugars the other day, considering this topic comes up at least twice a day.

    So ironic that honey ("natural", therefore "good" to the back-to-nature crowd) is 41% fructose, whereas high fructose corn syrup ("man-made", therefore responsible for all evils to the back-to-nature crowd) is 55% fructose. The remainder for both is mainly glucose. So is fructose "good" or "bad"? Neither, hahahahaha.

    Chemically, there are differences. Fructose:
    Fructose.jpg

    Glucose:
    Glucose-6-Red-Balls-for-the-Carbon-Atoms.png

    Confused? Our bodies aren't. We matabolise them all.
  • nicsflyingcircus
    nicsflyingcircus Posts: 2,184 Member
    DataSeven wrote: »
    For greek yogurt, I don't shy away from the full-fat (5%) versions. Fat makes me feel full, for 120 calories I'll take it. What kind I end up with usually depends on what's on sale though.

    Can't even find those around here. I had to ask my local Publix kindly to even stock the 2% Fage.

  • Jolinia
    Jolinia Posts: 846 Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    I made a table of sugars the other day, considering this topic comes up at least twice a day.

    So ironic that honey ("natural", therefore "good" to the back-to-nature crowd) is 41% fructose, whereas high fructose corn syrup ("man-made", therefore responsible for all evils to the back-to-nature crowd) is 55% fructose. The remainder for both is mainly glucose. So is fructose "good" or "bad"? Neither, hahahahaha.

    Chemically, there are differences. Fructose:
    Fructose.jpg

    Glucose:
    Glucose-6-Red-Balls-for-the-Carbon-Atoms.png

    Confused? Our bodies aren't. We matabolise them all.

    But do we metabolize fructose and glucose in exactly the same way?

  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,465 Member
    It hits our systems just as fast. I'm a diabetic. So I know. It's like asking if a left-handed batter hits a ball differently than a right-hander. Yes, there are small differences, but a home run is a home run regardless.
  • BadWolf_Rose
    BadWolf_Rose Posts: 27 Member
    edited February 2015
    DataSeven wrote: »
    For greek yogurt, I don't shy away from the full-fat (5%) versions. Fat makes me feel full, for 120 calories I'll take it. What kind I end up with usually depends on what's on sale though.

    Can't even find those around here. I had to ask my local Publix kindly to even stock the 2% Fage.

    Augh yes. I usually only see the non fat stuff, and that isn't as sating as the other kinds. It's so frustrating to me that this is usually the case... due to all forms of fat being demonized, even good for you fats. Fat (within reasonable consumption) is good, people.
  • Jolinia
    Jolinia Posts: 846 Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    It hits our systems just as fast. I'm a diabetic. So I know. It's like asking if a left-handed batter hits a ball differently than a right-hander. Yes, there are small differences, but a home run is a home run regardless.

    I didn't ask about speed. I'm more interested in what I've read and heard in lectures about how the liver handles fructose and the possible role in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and metabolic syndrome.
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,465 Member
    Considering that fructose is the sugar found in fruit and was our chief source of sweetness for a very, very, very long time, I'd say our bodies are well able to metabolise it.
  • Jolinia
    Jolinia Posts: 846 Member
    edited February 2015
    jgnatca wrote: »
    Considering that fructose is the sugar found in fruit and was our chief source of sweetness for a very, very, very long time, I'd say our bodies are well able to metabolise it.

    But does our body metabolize different sugars in different ways or does it treat every sugar the same?