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more protien better...or not?

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  • lisawinning4losinglisawinning4losing Posts: 732Member Member Posts: 732Member Member
    Well, protein keeps me a lot more full than carbs, so I figure that's a much better use of my calories. It also keeps your insulin levels stable because it digests more slowly (read: good for the metabolism), and it helps to build muscle, so I'd say it's a good thing! I definitely wouldn't worry about getting too bulky. Lol.
  • antennachickantennachick Posts: 464Member Member Posts: 464Member Member
    Well, protein keeps me a lot more full than carbs, so I figure that's a much better use of my calories. It also keeps your insulin levels stable because it digests more slowly (read: good for the metabolism), and it helps to build muscle, so I'd say it's a good thing! I definitely wouldn't worry about getting too bulky. Lol.
    Totally agree ;)
  • Carlos_421Carlos_421 Posts: 4,863Member, Premium Member Posts: 4,863Member, Premium Member
    Well, protein keeps me a lot more full than carbs, so I figure that's a much better use of my calories. It also keeps your insulin levels stable because it digests more slowly (read: good for the metabolism), and it helps to build muscle, so I'd say it's a good thing! I definitely wouldn't worry about getting too bulky. Lol.

    Protein actually spikes insulin (no big deal though because this is normal and healthy and doesn't hurt your metabolism).
  • antennachickantennachick Posts: 464Member Member Posts: 464Member Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Well, protein keeps me a lot more full than carbs, so I figure that's a much better use of my calories. It also keeps your insulin levels stable because it digests more slowly (read: good for the metabolism), and it helps to build muscle, so I'd say it's a good thing! I definitely wouldn't worry about getting too bulky. Lol.

    Protein actually spikes insulin (no big deal though because this is normal and healthy and doesn't hurt your metabolism).

    does any food raising your insulin levels?
  • Carlos_421Carlos_421 Posts: 4,863Member, Premium Member Posts: 4,863Member, Premium Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Well, protein keeps me a lot more full than carbs, so I figure that's a much better use of my calories. It also keeps your insulin levels stable because it digests more slowly (read: good for the metabolism), and it helps to build muscle, so I'd say it's a good thing! I definitely wouldn't worry about getting too bulky. Lol.

    Protein actually spikes insulin (no big deal though because this is normal and healthy and doesn't hurt your metabolism).

    does any food raising your insulin levels?

    Many fats don't (but some do). The hype around insulin spikes is just that, hype. Unless someone is diabetic, there's no reason to be concerned about the fact that a food raises insulin levels. In healthy individuals, that's what supposed to happen.
  • richlnrichln Posts: 811Member Member Posts: 811Member Member
  • stealthqstealthq Posts: 4,307Member Member Posts: 4,307Member Member
    Orphia wrote: »
    Didn't want to start a new thread, but a person I have quite high regard for has been saying the average Western diet contains more than enough protein, and doesn't need extra concern and supplementation when in a deficit.

    Thoughts?

    I thought I'd mention it because there seems to be great concern these days and at MFP about getting enough protein in a deficit, but 20 years ago, before this trend started, millions of dieting people weren't fading away with muscle wastage.

    Bit puzzled.

    I would say that the average diet probably is fine for someone who is not dieting and wanting to preserve muscle mass and is not overly active (these people usually have an interest in their diets and aren't eating the average diet anyway).

    My diet back before I bothered to think about what I was eating (and I would not consider average) probably hovered just below or maybe just at the minimum RDA.

    ETA: I meant to say the overly active people tend to watch their diets - not sure that was clear.
    edited March 2016
  • stealthqstealthq Posts: 4,307Member Member Posts: 4,307Member Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    cbelc2 wrote: »
    We need enough protein to build and repair tissue but not so much that our kidneys are damaged by excretion of the excess. If you are unsure, have some lab work and a discussion with your doctor.

    There is no evidence that moderately high protein diets will cause kidney damage.

    No, but the suggestion to have lab work (or check your last results) isn't a bad one if you've got risk factors for kidney disease - like you're diabetic or have high blood pressure. Kidney disease is sneaky and usually isn't discovered until it's really far along. Moderately high protein intake can absolutely make that worse.
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Well, protein keeps me a lot more full than carbs, so I figure that's a much better use of my calories. It also keeps your insulin levels stable because it digests more slowly (read: good for the metabolism), and it helps to build muscle, so I'd say it's a good thing! I definitely wouldn't worry about getting too bulky. Lol.

    Protein actually spikes insulin (no big deal though because this is normal and healthy and doesn't hurt your metabolism).

    does any food raising your insulin levels?

    Many fats don't (but some do). The hype around insulin spikes is just that, hype. Unless someone is diabetic, there's no reason to be concerned about the fact that a food raises insulin levels. In healthy individuals, that's what supposed to happen.
    I think it's worth noting though that very high BG spikes is what can (over time) drag some healthy individuals into a diabetic state. So while for most people it may be fine, some people do need to be mindful of this.

  • stealthqstealthq Posts: 4,307Member Member Posts: 4,307Member Member
    hectorh82 wrote: »
    ok ok ok.. one thing you must always remember with protein is!!!!! consume your daily minimum.. thats it!!!
    now if you wish to increase muscle growth im talking bulk then increase protein gradually.. if you want lean muscle stick with your minimum and do it the natural way by hard work and various exercises.. marketing has people freaking about carbs and protein.. your body needs both!!!! your daily minimum is enough for day to day, if you are super active increase those levels slightly.. not 2 or 3 shakes a day!! one jacks your stomach up second its a waist of money lol... everyone here has great advice, just take examples from everyone and test them out..

    If protein shakes are 'jacking up your stomach', try a different protein. Better yet, if you've got the calories to spare get the protein through regular food.

    That's not a good reason to eat the daily minimum (I assume you mean the RDA).

    Wasn't there a study that indicated that eating more than the RDA of protein correlated to preserving muscle mass as you age? Or am I pulling that out of the ether?
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Posts: 34,974Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator Posts: 34,974Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Well, protein keeps me a lot more full than carbs, so I figure that's a much better use of my calories. It also keeps your insulin levels stable because it digests more slowly (read: good for the metabolism), and it helps to build muscle, so I'd say it's a good thing! I definitely wouldn't worry about getting too bulky. Lol.

    Protein actually spikes insulin (no big deal though because this is normal and healthy and doesn't hurt your metabolism).

    does any food raising your insulin levels?

    Many fats don't (but some do). The hype around insulin spikes is just that, hype. Unless someone is diabetic, there's no reason to be concerned about the fact that a food raises insulin levels. In healthy individuals, that's what supposed to happen.
    I think it's worth noting though that very high BG spikes is what can (over time) drag some healthy individuals into a diabetic state. So while for most people it may be fine, some people do need to be mindful of this.

    I would question that. I would think obesity wold be a bigger cause. The fact, that one has BG spikes all day long isn't the driving factor. But if you have some research on it, I would love to see it.
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Posts: 34,974Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator Posts: 34,974Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator
    stealthq wrote: »
    hectorh82 wrote: »
    ok ok ok.. one thing you must always remember with protein is!!!!! consume your daily minimum.. thats it!!!
    now if you wish to increase muscle growth im talking bulk then increase protein gradually.. if you want lean muscle stick with your minimum and do it the natural way by hard work and various exercises.. marketing has people freaking about carbs and protein.. your body needs both!!!! your daily minimum is enough for day to day, if you are super active increase those levels slightly.. not 2 or 3 shakes a day!! one jacks your stomach up second its a waist of money lol... everyone here has great advice, just take examples from everyone and test them out..

    If protein shakes are 'jacking up your stomach', try a different protein. Better yet, if you've got the calories to spare get the protein through regular food.

    That's not a good reason to eat the daily minimum (I assume you mean the RDA).

    Wasn't there a study that indicated that eating more than the RDA of protein correlated to preserving muscle mass as you age? Or am I pulling that out of the ether?

    You are on point. In fact, elderly people are suggested to eat high levels of protein than the average person. I will see if I can dig up the research.
  • Carlos_421Carlos_421 Posts: 4,863Member, Premium Member Posts: 4,863Member, Premium Member
    stealthq wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    cbelc2 wrote: »
    We need enough protein to build and repair tissue but not so much that our kidneys are damaged by excretion of the excess. If you are unsure, have some lab work and a discussion with your doctor.

    There is no evidence that moderately high protein diets will cause kidney damage.

    No, but the suggestion to have lab work (or check your last results) isn't a bad one if you've got risk factors for kidney disease - like you're diabetic or have high blood pressure. Kidney disease is sneaky and usually isn't discovered until it's really far along. Moderately high protein intake can absolutely make that worse.

    Very true. And I would even say it's worth getting bloodwork done annually regardless of protein intake.
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Well, protein keeps me a lot more full than carbs, so I figure that's a much better use of my calories. It also keeps your insulin levels stable because it digests more slowly (read: good for the metabolism), and it helps to build muscle, so I'd say it's a good thing! I definitely wouldn't worry about getting too bulky. Lol.

    Protein actually spikes insulin (no big deal though because this is normal and healthy and doesn't hurt your metabolism).

    does any food raising your insulin levels?

    Many fats don't (but some do). The hype around insulin spikes is just that, hype. Unless someone is diabetic, there's no reason to be concerned about the fact that a food raises insulin levels. In healthy individuals, that's what supposed to happen.
    I think it's worth noting though that very high BG spikes is what can (over time) drag some healthy individuals into a diabetic state. So while for most people it may be fine, some people do need to be mindful of this.

    Insulin spikes keep people from having high blood glucose spikes.
  • Carlos_421Carlos_421 Posts: 4,863Member, Premium Member Posts: 4,863Member, Premium Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Well, protein keeps me a lot more full than carbs, so I figure that's a much better use of my calories. It also keeps your insulin levels stable because it digests more slowly (read: good for the metabolism), and it helps to build muscle, so I'd say it's a good thing! I definitely wouldn't worry about getting too bulky. Lol.

    Protein actually spikes insulin (no big deal though because this is normal and healthy and doesn't hurt your metabolism).

    does any food raising your insulin levels?

    Many fats don't (but some do). The hype around insulin spikes is just that, hype. Unless someone is diabetic, there's no reason to be concerned about the fact that a food raises insulin levels. In healthy individuals, that's what supposed to happen.
    I think it's worth noting though that very high BG spikes is what can (over time) drag some healthy individuals into a diabetic state. So while for most people it may be fine, some people do need to be mindful of this.

    Actually, according to the mayo clinic, there is no known cause, although genetics, excess weight and inactivity are the main risk factors.
    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/symptoms-causes/dxc-20169861
    edited March 2016
  • jgnatcajgnatca Posts: 14,495Member Member Posts: 14,495Member Member
    @ForecasterJason a diabetic state as in dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)? As a type 2 I never spiked or dipped on protein. In fact, I never dipped at all until I got closer to normal weight. Protein usually metablolises too slowly to affect me one way or another. Whey protein, as I've learned from the body builders here, is an exception.
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Well, protein keeps me a lot more full than carbs, so I figure that's a much better use of my calories. It also keeps your insulin levels stable because it digests more slowly (read: good for the metabolism), and it helps to build muscle, so I'd say it's a good thing! I definitely wouldn't worry about getting too bulky. Lol.

    Protein actually spikes insulin (no big deal though because this is normal and healthy and doesn't hurt your metabolism).

    does any food raising your insulin levels?

    Many fats don't (but some do). The hype around insulin spikes is just that, hype. Unless someone is diabetic, there's no reason to be concerned about the fact that a food raises insulin levels. In healthy individuals, that's what supposed to happen.
    I think it's worth noting though that very high BG spikes is what can (over time) drag some healthy individuals into a diabetic state. So while for most people it may be fine, some people do need to be mindful of this.

    Insulin spikes keep people from having high blood glucose spikes.
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Well, protein keeps me a lot more full than carbs, so I figure that's a much better use of my calories. It also keeps your insulin levels stable because it digests more slowly (read: good for the metabolism), and it helps to build muscle, so I'd say it's a good thing! I definitely wouldn't worry about getting too bulky. Lol.

    Protein actually spikes insulin (no big deal though because this is normal and healthy and doesn't hurt your metabolism).

    does any food raising your insulin levels?

    Many fats don't (but some do). The hype around insulin spikes is just that, hype. Unless someone is diabetic, there's no reason to be concerned about the fact that a food raises insulin levels. In healthy individuals, that's what supposed to happen.
    I think it's worth noting though that very high BG spikes is what can (over time) drag some healthy individuals into a diabetic state. So while for most people it may be fine, some people do need to be mindful of this.

    Actually, according to the mayo clinic, there is no known cause, although genetics, excess weight and inactivity are the main risk factors.
    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/symptoms-causes/dxc-20169861
    Understood. But considering a large portion of the population (more than 100,000,000 Americans) have a disruptive insulin and glucose metabolism, I think more people should be concerned about insulin spikes.
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    @ForecasterJason a diabetic state as in dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)? As a type 2 I never spiked or dipped on protein. In fact, I never dipped at all until I got closer to normal weight. Protein usually metablolises too slowly to affect me one way or another. Whey protein, as I've learned from the body builders here, is an exception.
    Right, I did not think protein was usually much of a factor. If my understanding is correct, I thought all along that it's the insulin spike in response to carbs/high blood sugar that is more so the issue.
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Posts: 36,690Member Member Posts: 36,690Member Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Well, protein keeps me a lot more full than carbs, so I figure that's a much better use of my calories. It also keeps your insulin levels stable because it digests more slowly (read: good for the metabolism), and it helps to build muscle, so I'd say it's a good thing! I definitely wouldn't worry about getting too bulky. Lol.

    Protein actually spikes insulin (no big deal though because this is normal and healthy and doesn't hurt your metabolism).

    does any food raising your insulin levels?

    Many fats don't (but some do). The hype around insulin spikes is just that, hype. Unless someone is diabetic, there's no reason to be concerned about the fact that a food raises insulin levels. In healthy individuals, that's what supposed to happen.
    I think it's worth noting though that very high BG spikes is what can (over time) drag some healthy individuals into a diabetic state. So while for most people it may be fine, some people do need to be mindful of this.

    When insulin "spikes" this prevents BG from spiking...so in other words, if your insulin is spiking...congratulations...your body is working the way it should. When you fail to produce enough insulin and you're not getting insulin spikes...well, this is where the issue is...

    Note that it said protein causes insulin spikes...not BG spikes.

  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Well, protein keeps me a lot more full than carbs, so I figure that's a much better use of my calories. It also keeps your insulin levels stable because it digests more slowly (read: good for the metabolism), and it helps to build muscle, so I'd say it's a good thing! I definitely wouldn't worry about getting too bulky. Lol.

    Protein actually spikes insulin (no big deal though because this is normal and healthy and doesn't hurt your metabolism).

    does any food raising your insulin levels?

    Many fats don't (but some do). The hype around insulin spikes is just that, hype. Unless someone is diabetic, there's no reason to be concerned about the fact that a food raises insulin levels. In healthy individuals, that's what supposed to happen.
    I think it's worth noting though that very high BG spikes is what can (over time) drag some healthy individuals into a diabetic state. So while for most people it may be fine, some people do need to be mindful of this.

    Insulin spikes keep people from having high blood glucose spikes.
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Well, protein keeps me a lot more full than carbs, so I figure that's a much better use of my calories. It also keeps your insulin levels stable because it digests more slowly (read: good for the metabolism), and it helps to build muscle, so I'd say it's a good thing! I definitely wouldn't worry about getting too bulky. Lol.

    Protein actually spikes insulin (no big deal though because this is normal and healthy and doesn't hurt your metabolism).

    does any food raising your insulin levels?

    Many fats don't (but some do). The hype around insulin spikes is just that, hype. Unless someone is diabetic, there's no reason to be concerned about the fact that a food raises insulin levels. In healthy individuals, that's what supposed to happen.
    I think it's worth noting though that very high BG spikes is what can (over time) drag some healthy individuals into a diabetic state. So while for most people it may be fine, some people do need to be mindful of this.

    Actually, according to the mayo clinic, there is no known cause, although genetics, excess weight and inactivity are the main risk factors.
    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/symptoms-causes/dxc-20169861
    Understood. But considering a large portion of the population (more than 100,000,000 Americans) have a disruptive insulin and glucose metabolism, I think more people should be concerned about insulin spikes.

    1 out 3 Americans? Depending on how it is defined, that's pretty good when 2 out of 3 Americans are overweight or obese.
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