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Full or low fat dairy?

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  • markrgeary1markrgeary1 Posts: 853Member Member Posts: 853Member Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    I can't believe so many people think there is added sugar in low fat dairy...mind blown....

    I can believe people like drinking full fat milk.. its like drinking lard... only thing worst is cottage cheese. Its like eating vomit.

    I put heavy cream in my whole milk, YUM!
  • stealthqstealthq Posts: 4,307Member Member Posts: 4,307Member Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    I can't believe so many people think there is added sugar in low fat dairy...mind blown....

    I cant believe people like drinking full fat milk.. its like drinking lard... only thing worst is cottage cheese. Its like eating vomit.

    I don't drink full fat milk because I don't like the way it coats my mouth - I'll happily eat cottage cheese, though. Plain isn't the best (needs more flavor), but it's not bad either.
    edited April 2016
  • lithezebralithezebra Posts: 3,684Member Member Posts: 3,684Member Member
    A recent study in Circulation showed that people with higher circulating biomarkers for dairy fat had a lower risk of developing diabetes.

    http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2016/03/22/CIRCULATIONAHA.115.018410.abstract
    edited April 2016
  • jgnatcajgnatca Posts: 14,495Member Member Posts: 14,495Member Member
    If your weight loss is stalling it is not mean for sure that your diet that is the culprit. You may be overestimating your burn in exercise. On the dairy front if you choose to consume low fat you could be missing out on important nutrition that comes from full fat dairy. Low fat versions are still better than not consuming any dairy for fewer calories. Just make the decision based on your own preferences.

    Other than fat, what important nutrients are present in full fat dairy and not in lowfat?

    Last I checked, the higher the fat content the greater the proportion of vitamins A and D. With whipping cream having the highest.
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    If your weight loss is stalling it is not mean for sure that your diet that is the culprit. You may be overestimating your burn in exercise. On the dairy front if you choose to consume low fat you could be missing out on important nutrition that comes from full fat dairy. Low fat versions are still better than not consuming any dairy for fewer calories. Just make the decision based on your own preferences.

    Other than fat, what important nutrients are present in full fat dairy and not in lowfat?

    Last I checked, the higher the fat content the greater the proportion of vitamins A and D. With whipping cream having the highest.

    I looked at the USDA numbers and it seems to depend solely on the amount of supplementation, so doesn't really matter which you choose -- some low or nonfat versions are better than whole. And, of course, since it's a supplement, you might as well just supplement in some other way. I always have plenty of A through food, but I take D (as the best source is the sun) when it's not summer. (I also don't drink milk, whole or reduced/no fat -- I eat yogurt and cottage cheese, but don't think they are typically supplemented with A and D.)
    edited April 2016
  • pzarnoskypzarnosky Posts: 256Member Member Posts: 256Member Member
    lithezebra wrote: »
    A recent study in Circulation showed that people with higher circulating biomarkers for dairy fat had a lower risk of developing diabetes.

    http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2016/03/22/CIRCULATIONAHA.115.018410.abstract

    Correlation does not equal causation. The first is the actual study, and the second is a tertiary article about the study. This isn't enough evidence though to paint with broad strokes and say that drinking full fat milk has anything to do (from a mechanism standpoint) with how/why diabetes mellitus develops, specifically because this is a cohort study. All they did was gather information about drinking full fat milk and incidence rates of diabetes. It's like a study looking into the incidence of drowning and ice cream sales (it was a real study). As ice cream sales increase, so do the incidence rates of drowning. Does that mean ice cream makes people drown? No, it means more people eat ice cream and swim in the summer, and because more people are swimming, more people drown.
    The reason there is a correlation between full fat milk and the decrease in diabetes is more because of what happens when the full fat is removed. People tend to feel hungrier because they lack the satiety of full fat products and end up supplementing the calories with carbohydrates, thus triggering an insuling response and so on.
    What individuals should do would be to drink the skim milk and then replace the loss of calories from fat not with carbohydrates, but with a source of unsaturated fatty acids, especially Omega-3's as the American diet is generally lacking Omega-3's...
  • lithezebralithezebra Posts: 3,684Member Member Posts: 3,684Member Member
    pzarnosky wrote: »
    lithezebra wrote: »
    A recent study in Circulation showed that people with higher circulating biomarkers for dairy fat had a lower risk of developing diabetes.

    http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2016/03/22/CIRCULATIONAHA.115.018410.abstract
    Correlation does not equal causation. .The first is the actual study, and the second is a tertiary article about the study. This isn't enough evidence though to paint with broad strokes and say that drinking full fat milk has anything to do (from a mechanism standpoint) with how/why diabetes mellitus develops, specifically because this is a cohort study. All they did was gather information about drinking full fat milk and incidence rates of diabetes. It's like a study looking into the incidence of drowning and ice cream sales (it was a real study). As ice cream sales increase, so do the incidence rates of drowning. Does that mean ice cream makes people drown? No, it means more people eat ice cream and swim in the summer, and because more people are swimming, more people drown.

    No. The researchers did what the title suggests they did, which was to test for biomarkers of dairy fat in the blood of the study participants. Those would be the odd chain fatty acids 15:0, 17:0, and the trans palmitoleic acid, t-16:1n-7. They did not gather information about drinking full fat milk and incidence of diabetes, and base their conclusions on that.

    pzarnosky wrote: »
    The reason there is a correlation between full fat milk and the decrease in diabetes is more because of what happens when the full fat is removed. People tend to feel hungrier because they lack the satiety of full fat products and end up supplementing the calories with carbohydrates, thus triggering an insuling response and so on.
    What individuals should do would be to drink the skim milk and then replace the loss of calories from fat not with carbohydrates, but with a source of unsaturated fatty acids, especially Omega-3's as the American diet is generally lacking Omega-3's...

    What happened to the restraint of "correlation does not equal causation?" Now you're stating your opinion as fact. My opinion is also that full fat dairy is more satiating, however I don't know if that is why people with higher fatty acid biomarkers of dairy fat in their blood had a lower incidence of diabetes. Trans palmitoleic acid has been linked in other studies to increased insulin sensitivity, for example, and that could have an effect on the development of diabetes.
    edited April 2016
  • rwhyte12rwhyte12 Posts: 201Member Member Posts: 201Member Member
    My mother-in-law is 70 and in good shape drinking full fat milk. She's not a cheese eater though. If she bakes, she eats butter. She just takes cholesterol medicine like everybody else. Following her lead, I decided that I would not buy anymore 1 percent milk. I made it 2 percent milk. I noticed my kids look a little healthier. I think it is great that you are questioning established nutritional guidelines.
  • Pinkylee77Pinkylee77 Posts: 432Member Member Posts: 432Member Member
    tomteboda wrote: »
    As several other people pointed out there's nothing chemical about removing the fat from the milk. Fat and water aren't soluble together, so when you leave the milk to sit the cream (fat) rises to the top. You actually have to work to keep the fat in solution with the milk (by churning).

    My grandfather was a dairy farmer. I grew up helping milk cows and other tasks on the farm. I am perfectly content with the safety of pasteurized milk, although there are a couple recipes I use that require raw. Ostkaka, Rømmegrøt ... you can make the latter from pasteurized, but its better from raw. Forget about getting Ostkaka correct though if you aren't using raw milk.

    I've never cared for fatty milk, even as a child. In my family this was not considered "normal" but there you have it. I drink skimmed milk. I'm fine with fattier milk in baked goods.

    I have drank skim milk for about 40 years but I eat full fat cheese and cook with fattier milk too. My mother grew up near her grandparents dairy farm and loved full fat milk but not me. They made skim milk back in the 1920's because the cream was worth more for butter making.
  • tomtebodatomteboda Posts: 2,176Member Member Posts: 2,176Member Member
    stealthq wrote: »
    I don't drink full fat milk because I don't like the way it coats my mouth - I'll happily eat cottage cheese, though. Plain isn't the best (needs more flavor), but it's not bad either.

    As a singer, I avoid all milk regardless of fat content for several hours before I need to perform for this reason.
  • dykekatie435dykekatie435 Posts: 9Member Member Posts: 9Member Member
    I've very recently turned to no dairy, or at least minimal dairy, if you think about it milk is given to children and baby animals to help them grow as an adult you do not need as many of the nutrients inside milk especially full fat, I now drink almond milk unsweetened and alpro non dairy yoghurt, found it's helped so much with dropping weight. I don't feel any different and it doesn't taste any different in tea or on cereal to me. Don't get me wrong if I'm at a friends I'll drink it, but it's a whole lot less as I was an avid tea and coffee drinker :-)
  • dykekatie435dykekatie435 Posts: 9Member Member Posts: 9Member Member
    Also I don't eat cheese, only because I don't like the taste, but if you do, then cut out dairy in milk, and get it from the cheese :-)
  • briscogunbriscogun Posts: 650Member Member Posts: 650Member Member
    When I was in weight-loss mode, I used lots of "lite" options (lite mayo, lite sour cream, cheese made with 2% milk, etc). Also, I cut out milk and switched to Almond Milk. A cup of 2% milk runs about 120 calories, almond milk is like 30-35 I believe. I used sliced American cheese that goes for 60 calories a slice. If I used milk, I would try to get 1%. I don't think I've ever had whole milk in my life. Using lighter options when cutting calories is just smart to me, it's how I got from there to here.

    Now that I'm maintaining, I use full-fat options to get my calories up easily without having to eat more food.

  • PascootyPascooty Posts: 34Member, Premium Member Posts: 34Member, Premium Member
    I grew up on a farm, we had our own home milk and butter. I am lactose intolerant though. Almost all dairy I buy is light and the milk is skim (with the exception of cheese - some foods are worth the suffering!). I never actually bought lighter dairy for fear of the fat, just the lactose issue.
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