Calorie Counter

You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Coke Zero

illusionist121illusionist121 Posts: 27Member Member Posts: 27Member Member
So there's a fizzy drink with zero sugar and zero calories that tastes good, of course I'm talking about coke zero but how good/bad is it for you whilst on a strict diet?
edited March 2016
«1

Replies

  • StealthHealthStealthHealth Posts: 2,418Member Member Posts: 2,418Member Member
    As long as you're not allergic or have adverse reactions to any of the ingredients it is neither good nor bad.
  • candistyxcandistyx Posts: 553Member Member Posts: 553Member Member
    There's some relatively new research showing that artificial sweeteners such as those found in Coke Zero (interestingly though, not stevia) can alter your gut microbiome in a way that results in higher blood sugar levels. If you have risk factors for diabetes it might be worth bearing that in mind.

    Some reading material:
    http://www.webmd.com/diet/20140917/artificial-sweeteners-blood-sugar
    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/17/artificial-sweeteners-may-disrupt-bodys-blood-sugar-controls/
  • illusionist121illusionist121 Posts: 27Member Member Posts: 27Member Member
    I don't have it too often but it makes a nice change from water c:
    As long as you're not allergic or have adverse reactions to any of the ingredients it is neither good nor bad.

  • illusionist121illusionist121 Posts: 27Member Member Posts: 27Member Member
    Thank you I will definitely give it all a read c:
    candistyx wrote: »
    There's some relatively new research showing that artificial sweeteners such as those found in Coke Zero (interestingly though, not stevia) can alter your gut microbiome in a way that results in higher blood sugar levels. If you have risk factors for diabetes it might be worth bearing that in mind.

    Some reading material:
    http://www.webmd.com/diet/20140917/artificial-sweeteners-blood-sugar
    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/17/artificial-sweeteners-may-disrupt-bodys-blood-sugar-controls/

  • StealthHealthStealthHealth Posts: 2,418Member Member Posts: 2,418Member Member
    If you don't drink it often then
    candistyx wrote: »
    There's some relatively new research showing that artificial sweeteners such as those found in Coke Zero (interestingly though, not stevia) can alter your gut microbiome in a way that results in higher blood sugar levels. If you have risk factors for diabetes it might be worth bearing that in mind.

    Some reading material:
    http://www.webmd.com/diet/20140917/artificial-sweeteners-blood-sugar
    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/17/artificial-sweeteners-may-disrupt-bodys-blood-sugar-controls/

    the study in bold is irrelevant to you since the 7(!) people studied were given the FDA’s maximum acceptable daily intake of saccharin.
  • illusionist121illusionist121 Posts: 27Member Member Posts: 27Member Member
    I'm unsure what is considered often or a lot tbh , I have about 3 cans a week one on Friday Saturday and Sunday
    If you don't drink it often then
    candistyx wrote: »
    There's some relatively new research showing that artificial sweeteners such as those found in Coke Zero (interestingly though, not stevia) can alter your gut microbiome in a way that results in higher blood sugar levels. If you have risk factors for diabetes it might be worth bearing that in mind.

    Some reading material:
    http://www.webmd.com/diet/20140917/artificial-sweeteners-blood-sugar
    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/17/artificial-sweeteners-may-disrupt-bodys-blood-sugar-controls/

    the study in bold is irrelevant to you since the 7(!) people studied were given the FDA’s maximum acceptable daily intake of saccharin.

  • amyjane_gamyjane_g Posts: 33Member, Premium Member Posts: 33Member, Premium Member
    Coke Zero does not contain any of the following:
    • Calories
    • Fat
    • Carbohydrates
    • Cholesterol
    • Sugars

    It also provides zero nutritional benefits. and does not contain any protein, fibre, vitamin C, vitamin A, calcium or iron...

    Makes you wonder what it actually does contain.... (If anything)
  • StealthHealthStealthHealth Posts: 2,418Member Member Posts: 2,418Member Member
    well after a bit of googling it would appear that Coke Zero doesn't contain Saccharin but uses Aspartame instead.

    from https://beverageinstitute.org/article/saccharin/
    Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI)

    The US FDA has set the ADI for saccharin for children and adults at 5 mg/kg body weight. This means a 150-pound (68 kg) person can safely consume 340 mg of saccharin every day over his or her lifetime without adverse effects. The amount of saccharin in beverages sold by The Coca-Cola Company in the U.S. ranges from 7 mg per 12-fl. oz. serving in Diet Fanta Wild Cherry frozen carbonated beverageto 95 mg per 12-fl. oz. serving in Tab.*

    *Amounts as of May 2012; rounded up to the nearest 5 mg.

    That indicates that from a saccharin point of view a 150lb person could have 48 cans of Diet Fanta Wild Cherry frozen or 3 cans of Tab per day and be under the ADI.

    from same site:
    In the U.S., the FDA is responsible for setting the ADI for all food additives, including aspartame. In other countries, ADIs are established by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). The US FDA has set the ADI for aspartame at 50 mg/kg body weight for adults and children. The amount of low- and no-calorie sweeteners used to sweeten foods and beverages is very small, and far below ADI levels. For example, a 154-pound (70 kg) person would need to drink about 18 12-fl. oz. cans per day of a diet soda sweetened solely with aspartame in order to exceed the ADI (assuming no other sources of aspartame are in the diet).

    Note :12lf oz is a 330mls UK standard can.
  • stevencloserstevencloser Posts: 8,917Member Member Posts: 8,917Member Member
    amyjane_g wrote: »
    Coke Zero does not contain any of the following:
    • Calories
    • Fat
    • Carbohydrates
    • Cholesterol
    • Sugars

    It also provides zero nutritional benefits. and does not contain any protein, fibre, vitamin C, vitamin A, calcium or iron...

    Makes you wonder what it actually does contain.... (If anything)

    Water. 90+% of it is water. All things you listed are true for water.
  • StealthHealthStealthHealth Posts: 2,418Member Member Posts: 2,418Member Member
    short answer : from an artificial sweetener point of view a few cans per week is not going to be a problem.

    And I still stand by
    As long as you're not allergic or have adverse reactions to any of the ingredients it is neither good nor bad.

    edited March 2016
  • illusionist121illusionist121 Posts: 27Member Member Posts: 27Member Member
    Great, thank you
    short answer : from an artificial sweetener point of view a few cans per week is not going to be a problem.

    And I still stand by
    As long as you're not allergic or have adverse reactions to any of the ingredients it is neither good nor bad.

  • amyjane_gamyjane_g Posts: 33Member, Premium Member Posts: 33Member, Premium Member
    amyjane_g wrote: »
    Coke Zero does not contain any of the following:
    • Calories
    • Fat
    • Carbohydrates
    • Cholesterol
    • Sugars

    It also provides zero nutritional benefits. and does not contain any protein, fibre, vitamin C, vitamin A, calcium or iron...

    Makes you wonder what it actually does contain.... (If anything)

    Water. 90+% of it is water. All things you listed are true for water.

    Whilst I agree that the main ingredient in coke zero is (carbonated) water. It also contains the following, which water does not:
    • Carbonated Water
    • Colour (Caramel E150d)
    • Phosphoric Acid
    • Sweeteners (Aspartame, Acesulfame K)
    • Natural Flavourings: Including Caffeine, Acidity Regulator (Sodium Citrate)

    Contains a Source of Phenylalanine - which is 50% of aspartame......
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    Here is some information that may be helpful:

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/artificial-sweeteners/art-20046936?pg=1
    The FDA has also established an acceptable daily intake (ADI) for each artificial sweetener. This is the maximum amount considered safe to consume each day over the course of your lifetime. ADIs are intended to be about 100 times less than the smallest amount that might cause health concerns.

    http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/nutrition/dietary-guidelines-and-myplate/sugar-substitutes-how-much-is-too-much
    Regulatory agencies set Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) levels for each artificial sweetener. The ADI is the maximum amount of a food additive that can be safely consumed on a daily basis over a person's lifetime without any adverse effects. Although the number of diet soft drinks and other "sugar free" products we devour may seem high, the U.S. intake of sugar substitutes is actually well below the ADI even for the heaviest users, namely dieters, adults, children with diabetes and women of child-bearing age.

    To get an idea of how much sugar substitutes can be consumed without adverse effects, consider the following examples: A 150-pound adult can safely consume 2.4 cans of 12-ounce soda or 8.6 packets of sweetener containing saccharin daily. Similarly, that same adult can safely consume 17 cans of 12-ounce soda or 97.4 packets of artificial sweetener containing aspartame daily and not be adversely affected. Meanwhile, the ADI for saccharin for a 50-pound child is .8 of a 12-ounce can of soda daily and 2.8 packets of sweetener, or 5.6 cans of soda and 32.4 packets of artificial sweetener containing aspartame.

    And here's a discussion of the study referenced above: http://www.bio.davidson.edu/courses/genomics/309redesigned/papers_current/sequencing/metagnomics/2014artificial_sweet_comm.pdf

    It's kind of interesting, but since I eat a healthy diet, don't seem to have any issue with my gut bacteria, and have shown no tendencies toward IR even before losing weight (and currently have no risk factors), I'm not concerned about drinking an occasional diet coke or other artificially sweetened beverage (even without getting into the differences between the various options). I wouldn't drink Coke Zero, but that's purely a taste preference! ;-)

    For me, a diet soda occasionally hits the spot when I want something besides water and don't want to snack. It never makes me hungrier, quite the opposite, and as I lost weight at a normal rate when drinking it I'm not concerned that it interferes with weight loss or is making me fat.

    I don't know about diet sodas, but I do know the stats on soda drinkers in general is that the consumption curve is weird and that lots of people drink little, some drink moderate amounts, but heavy users tend to be really, really heavy users (this is something I picked up from Sugar, Salt, Fat). Most of the studies I've seen about heavy soda use similarly focus on that really heavy amount. I certainly would cut back if I were drinking a whole lot. I don't see 3 cans/week as a whole lot, personally.
  • stevencloserstevencloser Posts: 8,917Member Member Posts: 8,917Member Member
    amyjane_g wrote: »
    amyjane_g wrote: »
    Coke Zero does not contain any of the following:
    • Calories
    • Fat
    • Carbohydrates
    • Cholesterol
    • Sugars

    It also provides zero nutritional benefits. and does not contain any protein, fibre, vitamin C, vitamin A, calcium or iron...

    Makes you wonder what it actually does contain.... (If anything)

    Water. 90+% of it is water. All things you listed are true for water.

    Whilst I agree that the main ingredient in coke zero is (carbonated) water. It also contains the following, which water does not:
    • Carbonated Water
    • Colour (Caramel E150d)
    • Phosphoric Acid
    • Sweeteners (Aspartame, Acesulfame K)
    • Natural Flavourings: Including Caffeine, Acidity Regulator (Sodium Citrate)

    Contains a Source of Phenylalanine - which is 50% of aspartame......

    Do you have PKU? Cause that's the only reason to be concerned about phenylanine. As it is an amino acid, you'd have to be in A low protein diet with PKU I heard.
  • candistyxcandistyx Posts: 553Member Member Posts: 553Member Member
    If you don't drink it often then
    candistyx wrote: »
    There's some relatively new research showing that artificial sweeteners such as those found in Coke Zero (interestingly though, not stevia) can alter your gut microbiome in a way that results in higher blood sugar levels. If you have risk factors for diabetes it might be worth bearing that in mind.

    Some reading material:
    http://www.webmd.com/diet/20140917/artificial-sweeteners-blood-sugar
    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/17/artificial-sweeteners-may-disrupt-bodys-blood-sugar-controls/

    the study in bold is irrelevant to you since the 7(!) people studied were given the FDA’s maximum acceptable daily intake of saccharin.

    Equivalent to about 18 cans of diet drink. I used to drink over 2L a day of diet coke so it's entirely achievable to reach that level.

    And sure it's preliminary research but it's worth bearing in mind, especially if you have relatives with type 2 diabetes. Why take the risk if you don't have to. I drink water now.
  • stevencloserstevencloser Posts: 8,917Member Member Posts: 8,917Member Member
    candistyx wrote: »
    If you don't drink it often then
    candistyx wrote: »
    There's some relatively new research showing that artificial sweeteners such as those found in Coke Zero (interestingly though, not stevia) can alter your gut microbiome in a way that results in higher blood sugar levels. If you have risk factors for diabetes it might be worth bearing that in mind.

    Some reading material:
    http://www.webmd.com/diet/20140917/artificial-sweeteners-blood-sugar
    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/17/artificial-sweeteners-may-disrupt-bodys-blood-sugar-controls/

    the study in bold is irrelevant to you since the 7(!) people studied were given the FDA’s maximum acceptable daily intake of saccharin.

    Equivalent to about 18 cans of diet drink. I used to drink over 2L a day of diet coke so it's entirely achievable to reach that level.

    And sure it's preliminary research but it's worth bearing in mind, especially if you have relatives with type 2 diabetes. Why take the risk if you don't have to. I drink water now.

    2L is 6 cans.
  • candistyxcandistyx Posts: 553Member Member Posts: 553Member Member
    candistyx wrote: »
    If you don't drink it often then
    candistyx wrote: »
    There's some relatively new research showing that artificial sweeteners such as those found in Coke Zero (interestingly though, not stevia) can alter your gut microbiome in a way that results in higher blood sugar levels. If you have risk factors for diabetes it might be worth bearing that in mind.

    Some reading material:
    http://www.webmd.com/diet/20140917/artificial-sweeteners-blood-sugar
    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/17/artificial-sweeteners-may-disrupt-bodys-blood-sugar-controls/

    the study in bold is irrelevant to you since the 7(!) people studied were given the FDA’s maximum acceptable daily intake of saccharin.

    Equivalent to about 18 cans of diet drink. I used to drink over 2L a day of diet coke so it's entirely achievable to reach that level.

    And sure it's preliminary research but it's worth bearing in mind, especially if you have relatives with type 2 diabetes. Why take the risk if you don't have to. I drink water now.

    2L is 6 cans.

    Right, which is a third of 18. If there was (and yes we don't know yet) a linear dose response curve that would still have a significant effect.
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    Yeah, 6 cans a day is quite a lot, even if quite a bit smaller than the study.

    I don't think it's a choice between drinking none or drinking crazy high amounts.
  • stevencloserstevencloser Posts: 8,917Member Member Posts: 8,917Member Member
    candistyx wrote: »
    candistyx wrote: »
    If you don't drink it often then
    candistyx wrote: »
    There's some relatively new research showing that artificial sweeteners such as those found in Coke Zero (interestingly though, not stevia) can alter your gut microbiome in a way that results in higher blood sugar levels. If you have risk factors for diabetes it might be worth bearing that in mind.

    Some reading material:
    http://www.webmd.com/diet/20140917/artificial-sweeteners-blood-sugar
    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/17/artificial-sweeteners-may-disrupt-bodys-blood-sugar-controls/

    the study in bold is irrelevant to you since the 7(!) people studied were given the FDA’s maximum acceptable daily intake of saccharin.

    Equivalent to about 18 cans of diet drink. I used to drink over 2L a day of diet coke so it's entirely achievable to reach that level.

    And sure it's preliminary research but it's worth bearing in mind, especially if you have relatives with type 2 diabetes. Why take the risk if you don't have to. I drink water now.

    2L is 6 cans.

    Right, which is a third of 18. If there was (and yes we don't know yet) a linear dose response curve that would still have a significant effect.

    Things are rarely linear in these sorts of things.
  • Lextmg86Lextmg86 Posts: 102Member Member Posts: 102Member Member
    I do not drink soda of any kind but do use artificial sweeteners quite often. Maybe they just do not affect me but my blood sugar levels and other measurements are near perfect currently and I have been using the artificial sweeteners for years now.
Sign In or Register to comment.