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Does anyone else find this creepy?

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  • ryry_ryry_ Posts: 4,966Member Member Posts: 4,966Member Member
    rhtexasgal wrote: »
    This is a total non-issue for me because I decided to quit drinking soda. I would rather eat my sugar than drink it. An ice cream cone or a candy bar sounds a lot better than a single can of soda. At least there is a modicum of nutritional value in them.

    As for the creep factor, that company is just playing it smart, working both sides of the equation so to speak. I just ignore the crap that soda companies spew ...

    But does your ice cream cone or Candy bar have a sign to tell you to balance your intake with your expenditure? That is the real concern here
  • HornsbyHornsby Posts: 10,372Member Member Posts: 10,372Member Member
    shell1005 wrote: »
    Hornsby wrote: »
    Hornsby wrote: »
    If you don't think it's a problem, that's your prerogative. It seems Forbes reported on it, so if you want more information about the issue, here's an article for you.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/nancyhuehnergarth/2015/12/02/coca-coca-shuts-down-anti-obesity-network-but-still-teaches-energy-balance-in-schools/#70a13ada6d31

    The now-defunct GEBN is only one of numerous campaigns, programs and organizations that Big Soda uses to spread its unscientific message of energy balance. The soda industry is even in our schools telling children as young as two, ‘don’t drink less soda, just exercise more.’

    Public health experts have long criticized the soda industry’s focus on energy balance as a tactic to deflect attention from its unhealthy portfolio of sugary drinks.


    It seems "public health experts" and I share similar views. If you disagree, that's your prerogative too. If someone else would offer research instead of opinion and anecdote, that would be great too.

    That doesn't change the glaring problems with the study that you posted, which other people have pointed out and you've yet to counter.

    You also did not respond to the Mayo Clinic link that I posted that outlined the main risk factors for diabetes (soda not being one of them). What would your opinion be on the argument that the context of one's dietary and lifestyle habits in conjunction with the other risk factors for diabetes matters more than moderate soda consumption within one's calorie goals?

    @Alyssa_Is_LosingIt
    The Mayo Clinic article looks like it's written at a 6th grade level, like most patient education sheets. It doesn't mention diet at all. Is this supposed to mean that diet plays no part in the development of Type 2 Diabetes?

    As far as your question: What would your opinion be on the argument that the context of one's dietary and lifestyle habits in conjunction with the other risk factors for diabetes matters more than moderate soda consumption within one's calorie goals?

    Yeah, that's another topic and a little convoluted. Not sure where you're trying to go there, but just start another topic.

    Diet plays a role in the sense that over consumption can cause obesity, which can cause T2D. There is no one food responsible for it though...

    Diabetes is at its core a disease of carbohydrate intolerance. I don't know how else to say this: you're just plain wrong.

    Ask the people who have type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes what "one food" their doctor tells them to limit or count...

    Now you've completely moved the goal posts.

    Having diabetes and being at risk for diabetes are two different things. Just because a person with diabetes processes sugar differently than someone without diabetes, does not mean that carbohydrates/sugar cause diabetes.

    The main risk factors are well-known and are outlined in the Mayo Clinic article I posted.

    Just to be 100% clear. You are implying to me that Type 2 Diabetes is not caused by over-consumption of carbohydrates. If that is the case, we cannot agree to disagree. You are just plain wrong. Regardless of risk factors, the disease would not happen without the over-consumption of carbohydrates. Period.

    No, you're wrong. It's the over consumption of food, period. There are plenty of healthy individuals consuming 50-80% of their diets on carbohydrates...

    Hornsby and his abs are very correct here.

    How you doin? :insertjoeyvoice:
    edited April 2016
  • Wickedfaery73Wickedfaery73 Posts: 184Member Member Posts: 184Member Member
    http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/myths/?loc=db-slabnav

    Myth: If you are overweight or obese, you will eventually develop type 2 diabetes.

    Fact: Being overweight is a risk factor for developing this disease, but other risk factors such as family history, ethnicity and age also play a role. Unfortunately, too many people disregard the other risk factors for diabetes and think that weight is the only risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Most overweight people never develop type 2 diabetes, and many people with type 2 diabetes are at a normal weight or only moderately overweight.



    Myth: Eating too much sugar causes diabetes.


    Fact: The answer is not so simple. Type 1 diabetes is caused by genetics and unknown factors that trigger the onset of the disease; type 2 diabetes is caused by genetics and lifestyle factors.

    Being overweight does increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes, and a diet high in calories from any source contributes to weight gain. Research has shown that drinking sugary drinks is linked to type 2 diabetes.

    The American Diabetes Association recommends that people should avoid intake of sugar-sweetened beverages to help prevent diabetes. Sugar-sweetened beverages include beverages like:

    regular soda
    fruit punch
    fruit drinks
    energy drinks
    sports drinks
    sweet tea
    other sugary drinks.
    These will raise blood glucose and can provide several hundred calories in just one serving!

    See for yourself:

    Just one 12-ounce can of regular soda has about 150 calories and 40 grams of carbohydrate. This is the same amount of carbohydrate in 10 teaspoons of sugar!
    One cup of fruit punch and other sugary fruit drinks have about 100 calories (or more) and 30 grams of carbohydrate.
    - See more at: http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/myths/?loc=db-slabnav#sthash.VeFlhtwT.dpuf
  • CrisseydaCrisseyda Posts: 532Member Member Posts: 532Member Member
    If you don't think it's a problem, that's your prerogative. It seems Forbes reported on it, so if you want more information about the issue, here's an article for you.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/nancyhuehnergarth/2015/12/02/coca-coca-shuts-down-anti-obesity-network-but-still-teaches-energy-balance-in-schools/#70a13ada6d31

    The now-defunct GEBN is only one of numerous campaigns, programs and organizations that Big Soda uses to spread its unscientific message of energy balance. The soda industry is even in our schools telling children as young as two, ‘don’t drink less soda, just exercise more.’

    Public health experts have long criticized the soda industry’s focus on energy balance as a tactic to deflect attention from its unhealthy portfolio of sugary drinks.


    It seems "public health experts" and I share similar views. If you disagree, that's your prerogative too. If someone else would offer research instead of opinion and anecdote, that would be great too.

    That doesn't change the glaring problems with the study that you posted, which other people have pointed out and you've yet to counter.

    You also did not respond to the Mayo Clinic link that I posted that outlined the main risk factors for diabetes (soda not being one of them). What would your opinion be on the argument that the context of one's dietary and lifestyle habits in conjunction with the other risk factors for diabetes matters more than moderate soda consumption within one's calorie goals?

    @Alyssa_Is_LosingIt
    The Mayo Clinic article looks like it's written at a 6th grade level, like most patient education sheets. It doesn't mention diet at all. Is this supposed to mean that diet plays no part in the development of Type 2 Diabetes?

    As far as your question: What would your opinion be on the argument that the context of one's dietary and lifestyle habits in conjunction with the other risk factors for diabetes matters more than moderate soda consumption within one's calorie goals?

    Yeah, that's another topic and a little convoluted. Not sure where you're trying to go there, but just start another topic.

    It is not another topic - the study you posted discusses diabetes risk; I am discussing diabetes risk, and how other risk factors are weighted against soda consumption. I don't see how it's a "different topic" unless you're just trying to avoid discussing it.

    I'd like to know what you mean by "convoluted."

    Convoluted
    adjective
    1. (especially of an argument, story, or sentence) extremely complex and difficult to follow.
    "its convoluted narrative encompasses all manner of digressions"
    synonyms: complicated, complex, involved, elaborate, serpentine, labyrinthine, tortuous, tangled, Byzantine; More
    2. intricately folded, twisted, or coiled.
    "walnuts come in hard and convoluted shells"

    I find your question

    What would your opinion be on the argument that the context of one's dietary and lifestyle habits in conjunction with the other risk factors for diabetes matters more than moderate soda consumption within one's calorie goals?


    convoluted because 1. dietary habits and soda consumption would be intertwined 2. other risk factors for diabetes is a huge category 3. not sure what you mean by moderate (daily? every other day? weekly?)

    So... my answer is yes and no and either way?

    I posed my definition of moderation upthread, but I'll quote it here. I don't think that it's fair for you to tell someone to "go back and read the thread" when you obviously haven't read the responses yourself.
    It would depend on the person's overall diet and lifestyle. For me, with a calorie goal of about 1600 to lose weight, I prefer not to drink my calories, so moderation for me might be one regular soda per month (though I drink diet soda quite often).

    A fit and active male with plenty of LBM who maintains on 3,000 calories and rides their bike 50 miles per day could probably have one a day and it would still be "in moderation."

    Context matters.

    And thanks for the dictionary reference - I know what the word means, I don't understand why you saw my question as "extremely complex and difficult to follow." I was asking why you thought soda was such a large risk factor given that the other risk factors are likely the main ones to blame for contracting the disease.

    Sugar consumption is the risk factor. Soda is liquid sugar. Ok, I can't nurse this thread any longer... Be back much later.

    You're claiming that sugar (soda) consumption is the main risk factor in contracting diabetes. It is not.

    I meant to clarify based on your statement, that sugar consumption was the risk factor in question, not soda consumption. Never said anything about it being "such a large risk factor." Of course, there are many many risk factors to tangle out. I simply shared the study that link sugar availability to diabetes prevalence.
  • mbaker566mbaker566 Posts: 9,928Member Member Posts: 9,928Member Member
    since the question is do i find it creepy?
    no
  • Rage_PhishRage_Phish Posts: 1,514Member Member Posts: 1,514Member Member
    If you don't think it's a problem, that's your prerogative. It seems Forbes reported on it, so if you want more information about the issue, here's an article for you.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/nancyhuehnergarth/2015/12/02/coca-coca-shuts-down-anti-obesity-network-but-still-teaches-energy-balance-in-schools/#70a13ada6d31

    The now-defunct GEBN is only one of numerous campaigns, programs and organizations that Big Soda uses to spread its unscientific message of energy balance. The soda industry is even in our schools telling children as young as two, ‘don’t drink less soda, just exercise more.’

    Public health experts have long criticized the soda industry’s focus on energy balance as a tactic to deflect attention from its unhealthy portfolio of sugary drinks.


    It seems "public health experts" and I share similar views. If you disagree, that's your prerogative too. If someone else would offer research instead of opinion and anecdote, that would be great too.

    That doesn't change the glaring problems with the study that you posted, which other people have pointed out and you've yet to counter.

    You also did not respond to the Mayo Clinic link that I posted that outlined the main risk factors for diabetes (soda not being one of them). What would your opinion be on the argument that the context of one's dietary and lifestyle habits in conjunction with the other risk factors for diabetes matters more than moderate soda consumption within one's calorie goals?

    You're welcome to post another thread regarding that topic.

    lol
  • auddiiauddii Posts: 15,410Member Member Posts: 15,410Member Member
    Nope. Not creepy.
  • karmpaulkarmpaul Posts: 15Member Member Posts: 15Member Member
    I'd hate to see how you would react to things that are actually creepy, must be terrified lol
    edited April 2016
  • tomtebodatomteboda Posts: 2,176Member Member Posts: 2,176Member Member
    Of course its creepy. The way some of you act you must be a bunch of corporation apologists, shouldn't you be at a Trump rally or something. Corporations are almost all scum, now that is the truth.

    You do realize that "corporation" just means "legally recognized group of people doing business together"?
  • tincanonastringtincanonastring Posts: 3,969Member Member Posts: 3,969Member Member
    tomteboda wrote: »
    Of course its creepy. The way some of you act you must be a bunch of corporation apologists, shouldn't you be at a Trump rally or something. Corporations are almost all scum, now that is the truth.

    You do realize that "corporation" just means "legally recognized group of people doing business together"?

    Yeah, evil people.

    ETA: Shill.
    edited April 2016
  • kgeyserkgeyser Posts: 22,515Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter MFP Moderator Posts: 22,515Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter MFP Moderator
    Dear Posters,

    This topic has been reported numerous times, so you all know that means. Topic is closed for review.

    kgeyser
    MFP Moderator

This discussion has been closed.