Losing weight and gaining Muscle

245

Replies

  • RoxieDawn wrote: »
    RoxieDawn wrote: »
    usmcmp wrote: »
    Losing weight and gaining muscle at the same time is difficult. The body needs extra calories in order to build muscle, but losing weight requires we eat less calories. People who are new to lifting, returning to lifting from a long time off, or carrying lots of fat can gain some muscle while losing weight (some, not necessarily a lot).

    The best things you can do to support your goal are to have a smaller deficit, follow a progressive lifting routine (unless you have prior training and education it's best to pick one built by an expert), and eat adequate protein.

    If I were you, I would personally focus on just getting to the gym, and cutting the garbage foods out. Not saying you eat them but if you do (cupcakes, cookies, donuts, soda, chips, etc..) just cut them out, drink tons of water and get on a workout program. Once you maintain a consistent routine, diet, and gym time... then you can start counting calories and experimenting with what works for your body the best. Once you get in the groove 6-8 maybe 10 weeks in, you'll see improvements in fat loss and you'll look better. Once you lose some fat, I would recommend going into a slight caloric surplus by 200 or 300 calories a day. Just so you can put on muscle. You'll figure it out, everyone on here will help you along the way!

    He should start counting calories now. His fat loss is going to come down to being in a calorie deficit. While he can gain some newbie gainz as he begins losing weight, all he needs to do is pick a structured program, ensure his diet contains adequate protein to support weight loss, and keep his calorie deficit on the less aggressive side.

    He certainly does not have to restrict all his foods to 'clean foods' that I think your are describing. Its not necessary, while he can choose to eat nutrient dense foods and still can eat other things he enjoys while losing weight.

    eta: OP the following link contains many structured programs depending on your lifting experience.

    http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10332083/which-lifting-program-is-the-best-for-you/p1

    Counting calories is tedious for those who've been in the game a long time, for beginners... I would not recommend it, clean up the diet, get on a good program, get into a routine of making better choices... Consistency will lead to results, and results will boost self esteem, then that's what gets people addicted. But I hear ya

    Well this is your opinion and you are on a calorie counting site. The only way to ensure compliance especially being a beginner is to count calories, etc.. The things he learns now about calories, nutrition, fueling the body properly and how to lose weight the tediousness of things can taper down as he gets more knowledge and more comfortable, especially when he gets to maintaining his weight.

    If I may, you are speaking a lot of 'broness' on this site, I've read your other comments on other threads. The MFP process works, so let him or others do the process and learn for themselves.

    I practice what I preach, and it works for me. So I only pass on what works, it may not work for everyone and I understand that. But, I would also let someone know if something didn't work, or I think it's not beneficial. At the end of the day, it's trial and error, what works for you may not work for me, vice versa.. This is also a form of social media, I'm here to pass on knowledge and help others, just like everyone else. "broness" lol, I like that

    What you are preaching and passing on as "knowledge" is vague and basically broscience. The people that you are contradicting, some of who have won competitions btw, are doing what works and also what is backed by research and practise. Why would you need to do trial and error when you can actually build upon what is already known? People who ignore what is already well proven are putting themselves behind the curve for no good reason.

    I'm talking for beginners bro... I've been into fitness for a while now, I know what works and what doesn't. I ain't a child, it's not bro science.. Trying to be a nice as possible, but you're telling me what I'm saying is bro science, and I never once said what you said is wrong...

    I've been in fitness for over 35 years, likely longer than you've been walking, and I'm still finding out what I did before was wrong because it was stuff I learned from bros like eat clean, do behind the head work and upright rows etc. Sure it seems to work but a lot of what you learn in the gym or by trial and error is not only unhelpful but downright dangerous. If you have research to backup your position please feel free to highlight it so that we can have an enlightened discussion and see why you are making the suggestions that you are.

    I have no problem discussing differences but you are basically saying that everyone here has no clue but you. I don't know if that was intended but it certainly has that look to it. What the others are trying to offer the OP are ideas that are proven to work both by practise and by research.

    I respect your opinion, and I'm sorry you feel I think everyone else is wrong... which in no means is the case at all... But, good day to you mate, take care
  • Wheelhouse15
    Wheelhouse15 Posts: 5,589 Member
    RoxieDawn wrote: »
    RoxieDawn wrote: »
    usmcmp wrote: »
    Losing weight and gaining muscle at the same time is difficult. The body needs extra calories in order to build muscle, but losing weight requires we eat less calories. People who are new to lifting, returning to lifting from a long time off, or carrying lots of fat can gain some muscle while losing weight (some, not necessarily a lot).

    The best things you can do to support your goal are to have a smaller deficit, follow a progressive lifting routine (unless you have prior training and education it's best to pick one built by an expert), and eat adequate protein.

    If I were you, I would personally focus on just getting to the gym, and cutting the garbage foods out. Not saying you eat them but if you do (cupcakes, cookies, donuts, soda, chips, etc..) just cut them out, drink tons of water and get on a workout program. Once you maintain a consistent routine, diet, and gym time... then you can start counting calories and experimenting with what works for your body the best. Once you get in the groove 6-8 maybe 10 weeks in, you'll see improvements in fat loss and you'll look better. Once you lose some fat, I would recommend going into a slight caloric surplus by 200 or 300 calories a day. Just so you can put on muscle. You'll figure it out, everyone on here will help you along the way!

    He should start counting calories now. His fat loss is going to come down to being in a calorie deficit. While he can gain some newbie gainz as he begins losing weight, all he needs to do is pick a structured program, ensure his diet contains adequate protein to support weight loss, and keep his calorie deficit on the less aggressive side.

    He certainly does not have to restrict all his foods to 'clean foods' that I think your are describing. Its not necessary, while he can choose to eat nutrient dense foods and still can eat other things he enjoys while losing weight.

    eta: OP the following link contains many structured programs depending on your lifting experience.

    http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10332083/which-lifting-program-is-the-best-for-you/p1

    Counting calories is tedious for those who've been in the game a long time, for beginners... I would not recommend it, clean up the diet, get on a good program, get into a routine of making better choices... Consistency will lead to results, and results will boost self esteem, then that's what gets people addicted. But I hear ya

    Well this is your opinion and you are on a calorie counting site. The only way to ensure compliance especially being a beginner is to count calories, etc.. The things he learns now about calories, nutrition, fueling the body properly and how to lose weight the tediousness of things can taper down as he gets more knowledge and more comfortable, especially when he gets to maintaining his weight.

    If I may, you are speaking a lot of 'broness' on this site, I've read your other comments on other threads. The MFP process works, so let him or others do the process and learn for themselves.

    I practice what I preach, and it works for me. So I only pass on what works, it may not work for everyone and I understand that. But, I would also let someone know if something didn't work, or I think it's not beneficial. At the end of the day, it's trial and error, what works for you may not work for me, vice versa.. This is also a form of social media, I'm here to pass on knowledge and help others, just like everyone else. "broness" lol, I like that

    What you are preaching and passing on as "knowledge" is vague and basically broscience. The people that you are contradicting, some of who have won competitions btw, are doing what works and also what is backed by research and practise. Why would you need to do trial and error when you can actually build upon what is already known? People who ignore what is already well proven are putting themselves behind the curve for no good reason.

    I'm talking for beginners bro... I've been into fitness for a while now, I know what works and what doesn't. I ain't a child, it's not bro science.. Trying to be a nice as possible, but you're telling me what I'm saying is bro science, and I never once said what you said is wrong...

    I've been in fitness for over 35 years, likely longer than you've been walking, and I'm still finding out what I did before was wrong because it was stuff I learned from bros like eat clean, do behind the head work and upright rows etc. Sure it seems to work but a lot of what you learn in the gym or by trial and error is not only unhelpful but downright dangerous. If you have research to backup your position please feel free to highlight it so that we can have an enlightened discussion and see why you are making the suggestions that you are.

    I have no problem discussing differences but you are basically saying that everyone here has no clue but you. I don't know if that was intended but it certainly has that look to it. What the others are trying to offer the OP are ideas that are proven to work both by practise and by research.

    I respect your opinion, and I'm sorry you feel I think everyone else is wrong... which in no means is the case at all... But, good day to you mate, take care

    Then it's just a misunderstanding and we can pick up the thread from there and see why we believe differently. Cheers.
  • usmcmp
    usmcmp Posts: 21,220 Member
    usmcmp wrote: »
    usmcmp wrote: »
    usmcmp wrote: »
    usmcmp wrote: »
    usmcmp wrote: »
    JerSchmare wrote: »
    Counting calories is useful for newbies. There was a recent thread about “foods that surprised you”, meaning calorie count was very high...usual things like peanut butter. Counting brings those things to light. Someone may not understand how real portions look. Calorie counting helps with that. Discounting it because it’s tedious is the most ridiculous thing I’ve ever heard. “Tedious” is relative.

    I'm more about working them in, showing them the gym and making better choices in the kitchen first. Then once they get into a routine of making better choices, then have them learn how to count calories... that's just me I guess, I'm not saying your wrong, I'd just go about it a little differently.

    And he comes back in 2 months wondering why he hasn't lost weight because he cut out 500 calories worth of pizza per week, but replace it with 1,000 calories worth of granola and nuts because they're "healthy". We don't even know what his choices are, maybe he's on a completely "clean" diet and is gaining weight. In the end it really comes down to calories and personally I'm going to keep eating "garbage" foods all the way up to this bodybuilding competition just like I did last time.

    Well I hope he has a mentor to show him exercises in the gym, and that's not necessarily a bad thing. If he doesn't lose any weight, but cuts out *kitten* foods. He'll actually build some muscle, and then do a caloric deficit by 200-300 calories then when the weight comes off, he'll actually have baby muscles. And good luck with that competition mate

    If he really weighs 250 pounds like he indicated then the nutrient partitioning for building mass isn't going to be any better than his gaining while cutting. You seem to place significant emphasis on what foods someone is eating as having a huge impact on their gains. Improving protein intake and ensuring you are getting adequate fat and vitamins is important, but beyond that you don't get extra credit for eating a 10th serving of vegetables rather than a cupcake if calories are equal. That cupcake from time to time could mean actual adherence to diet to many.

    Gotta crawl before you walk, all I'm saying man. Don't overwhelm the kid with too much at once, starting off with a good training program, having him understand what good foods are rather than not so good ones, then have him get on the routine consistently for 6-8-10 weeks... then teach him how to count calories...

    Again with with good food versus bad food thing. If someone has the calories for pizza or cake and it's not going to cause them to derail there is zero reason to skip something. This is why we say to count calories. In the end that's what matters. You can still gain weight eating your so called good foods. You can lose weight on a diet of nothing but Twinkies. Finding that balance of nutrient dense foods and still fitting in things people enjoy that you think are "bad" is the beauty of counting calories and in the end it's a sustainable method for most.

    Wouldn't you rather 2,000 calories of good nutritional food rather than 2,000 calories of McDonald's? I mean come on man, you're losing credibility here, I'd hope most people would go the healthier route

    Did I say to eat 2000 calories of McDonalds or did I say find a balance of nutrient dense foods and still fit in things you enjoy?

    Also, do you mean man as in dude or man as in male?

    I was :laugh: at that. @usmcmp is a woman, @GainsLevelIncreased.

    Glad I'm not the only one that gets called a guy around here.

    We should both quit deadlifting just shy of 400 pounds or we might grow male parts.

    Meh. I'm willing to risk it!

    Didja 'mire my 405 block pull yesterday, BTW?!? :p

    It was hot!
  • erickirb
    erickirb Posts: 12,292 Member
    usmcmp wrote: »
    JerSchmare wrote: »
    Counting calories is useful for newbies. There was a recent thread about “foods that surprised you”, meaning calorie count was very high...usual things like peanut butter. Counting brings those things to light. Someone may not understand how real portions look. Calorie counting helps with that. Discounting it because it’s tedious is the most ridiculous thing I’ve ever heard. “Tedious” is relative.

    I'm more about working them in, showing them the gym and making better choices in the kitchen first. Then once they get into a routine of making better choices, then have them learn how to count calories... that's just me I guess, I'm not saying your wrong, I'd just go about it a little differently.

    And he comes back in 2 months wondering why he hasn't lost weight because he cut out 500 calories worth of pizza per week, but replace it with 1,000 calories worth of granola and nuts because they're "healthy". We don't even know what his choices are, maybe he's on a completely "clean" diet and is gaining weight. In the end it really comes down to calories and personally I'm going to keep eating "garbage" foods all the way up to this bodybuilding competition just like I did last time.

    Well I hope he has a mentor to show him exercises in the gym, and that's not necessarily a bad thing. If he doesn't lose any weight, but cuts out *kitten* foods. He'll actually build some muscle, and then do a caloric deficit by 200-300 calories then when the weight comes off, he'll actually have baby muscles. And good luck with that competition mate

    how do you know he would be in a deficit if he cut out "junk", he may eat more non-junk that has even more caloreis to replace the junk.
  • sedj241
    sedj241 Posts: 36 Member
    I have no idea why someone would be using MyFitnessPal and not counting calories.

    I agree! I don't even think the guy question got answer.
  • quiksylver296
    quiksylver296 Posts: 28,443 Member
    sedj241 wrote: »
    I have no idea why someone would be using MyFitnessPal and not counting calories.

    I agree! I don't even think the guy question got answer.

    It got answered in the very first response.