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What are some of your unpopular opinions about food?

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  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 18,789 Member Member, Premium Posts: 18,789 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    I read some book on the rise of cake mix and other convenience foods. It was something of a women's social history of the 1920s-1960s or some such told through that lens. I can't recall the name of it, but if I look tomorrow I might be able to find it (I don't recall if I still have the book). Anyway, it was pretty interesting. One point is that people wanted a middle ground between just add water or buy premade goods and doing everything from scratch, and the add eggs but premixed dry ingredients seemed to fit.

    I also read this series of books written in the '50s as a kid, and in one of them the main character (who was from a less well off family) really wanted to be able to cook/eat the processed options and thought her mother's cooking from scratch was embarrassing. When she took over shopping and cooking for a while because her mother had to go tend to a family emergency, she quickly realized that not only was this too expensive, but not as filling/tasty. I think it's interesting that the class implications have shifted a lot, as cooking from scratch now is likely a status thing for many, while obv easy processed stuff (even when likely across classes) is cheap, so certainly has no status.

    I used to live in a very upper middle class professional neighborhood (my current one is more mixed), and the grocery store did a great business in super over priced pre cut veg/fruit, while people tended to disdain (or claim to disdain) other types of convenience foods.

    Anyway, I don't actually like to bake that much and rarely do (oddly enough I wanted to be good at it as a life skill so used to bake but losing weight gave me the freedom to admit that baked goods are rarely worth the cals for me and I like cooking but not baking -- I much prefer tossing ingredients together based on whim/what sounds good), so it's common for me not to have either mixes or the flour/sugar/baking powder type ingredients on hand. I bought some sugar before Christmas and just recently bought some flour because I wanted to make chicken and dumplings (I had baking powder for some reason), but I often don't have either on hand. I do pretty much always have eggs. Milk I have to buy if I need. I have cocoa for some reason, largely because I rarely use it. I think I bought a Bob's Red Mill brownie mix a couple of years ago because it was supposed to be tasty and lower cal, but have not used it. It's probably still in my pantry.

    The bolded was my understanding from my marketing classes when I was briefly in MBA school back in the 80s, too: That the first cake mixes were the "just add water" type, and they were not well accepted because of being seen as . . . I dunno, not special enough, or not trying hard enough or something . . . but that requiring adding egg and milk or oil or somesuch was apparently enough to make it feel homemade and fresh, so that increased acceptance. (I generally agree with your social class observations, too: I was raised rural, lower middle/blue collar working class, and worked in a small city/white collar setting, the latter in everything from a trailer park to the suburbs, so I've seen a variety of socio-economic contexts, and they've changed in some kind of ironic ways over time.)

    If the cocoa is unsweetened, try it in savories, if you haven't. I like it in veggie chili or some soups/stews, for example. (That ought to count as an unpopular opinion, and make this post on-topic, I'm thinking?)

    I don't use flour very fast these days (also not very baked-goods oriented, but keep it around . . . in my basement chest freezer, in tight containers, so it keeps for a really long time. I always have eggs, milk, and oil; have found baking powder to keep OK longer than alleged; and I think refined sugar would survive nuclear apocalypse and centuries beyond, alongside the cockroaches. Yeast is the one that can (truly) expire here, before I get around to using it.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member, Premium Posts: 6,772 Member Member, Premium Posts: 6,772 Member
    Yeah, the cocoa is unsweetened, has kept well so far. It was nice to have when we did a Day of the Dead thing with Mexican hot chocolate.

    My last flour got infested with some mites, but it was also way past the supposed expiration date--I just use flour very rarely. Sugar seems to last longer and is weirdly less likely to get infested, but I tend to buy it in much smaller quantities too. Milk I can never use before it goes bad since just din't use it that much unless I buy it for a specific purpose. (This is why I'm a fan of homemade cashew milk, since I always have cashews on hand.) I've been buying milk more lately since I've been experimenting with making yogurt. Oil, yeah, I have on hand. Yeast I used to have on hand when I made bread, but not for ages.
  • frankwbrownfrankwbrown Member, Premium Posts: 1,104 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,104 Member
    I love the idea of adding unsweetened cocoa to savory foods. I love chocolate with hot peppers... like a good mole sauce.
  • corinasue1143corinasue1143 Member Posts: 4,863 Member Member Posts: 4,863 Member
    Agree so much.
    Miss real fruit juice gummy snacks.
    Bet if crazyravr/justtomek was still here, he could come up with a recipe!
  • frankwbrownfrankwbrown Member, Premium Posts: 1,104 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,104 Member
    Decades ago, I attended a seminar at work on "Eating Right". At the time, Snapple was fairly new, and I had switched to it from cokes and other sodas. The presenter at one point took a Snapple, a teaspoon and a jar of sugar and began scooping sugar into a bowl, one teaspoon at a time, asking us to raise our hand when we thought she had added as much sugar as was in the bottle of Snapple. As I recall, it was around 10-12 teaspoons! Unfortunately, I still drank Snapple after that... but I no longer saw it as that much healthier of an alternative. :(
    (I haven't had a Snapple in probably a decade)
    edited January 23
  • PAPYRUS3PAPYRUS3 Member Posts: 8,859 Member Member Posts: 8,859 Member
    I can't understand the rational in not looking at food labels when purchasing...(I guess that's unpopular?) However I do think the majority of the population have WAY to much faith in food companies keeping themselves nutritionally healthy.
    edited January 24
  • Noreenmarie1234Noreenmarie1234 Member Posts: 6,292 Member Member Posts: 6,292 Member
    PAPYRUS3 wrote: »
    I can't understand the rational in not looking at food labels when purchasing...(I guess that's unpopular?) However I do think the majority of the population have WAY to much faith in food companies keeping themselves nutritionally healthy.

    I think it's more that most people don't know what to even look for. My aunt, for example, will say oh wow this juice is only 80 calories and 0 fat!! I can drink it all, it's so great and low calorie (when the bottle is a few servings). She does the same with ice cream. She doesn't understand the concept of serving size no matter how many times I explain it to her. Or people see 250 for granola and that doesn't phase them, they think that is low amount of calories. Others simply just don't know how many calories/sugar/etc they should be having in a day.
  • frankwbrownfrankwbrown Member, Premium Posts: 1,104 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,104 Member
    I think the reality is, most people don't really look at the nutritional info. At least, I know I didn't in decades past. When I first started looking at labels to track my grams of fat, protein and carbs, I was shocked to find that one of my favorite foods (Marie Callendar's Chicken Pot Pie) had 46 grams of fat, which was more than I was supposed to consume all day! Some people are a little more aware these days, but still, a lot of people just eat what they want -- hence the large percentage of the population that are suffering from obesity.
  • PAPYRUS3PAPYRUS3 Member Posts: 8,859 Member Member Posts: 8,859 Member
    ^I get this...I can't say strawberries/chocolate are my favorite - but I've enjoyed the ones I've had I guess... I, however, absolutely love chocolate w/ dried fruits/nuts/nut-seed butters.
  • frankwbrownfrankwbrown Member, Premium Posts: 1,104 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,104 Member
    ^ I'm no fan of chocolate and fruit either, except Terry's Chocolate Orange. It works for me because there's no fruit liqueur/syrup, like a chocolate-covered cherry. Instead, the orange flavor is infused into the chocolate. There's a similar Chocolate Raspberry that's also good.
  • corinasue1143corinasue1143 Member Posts: 4,863 Member Member Posts: 4,863 Member
    I don’t like chili and chocolate together, not in a chocolate bar, not in mole, no chili in my hot chocolate. Just no!

    Love chili! Love chocolate!
  • PAPYRUS3PAPYRUS3 Member Posts: 8,859 Member Member Posts: 8,859 Member
    ^ I'm no fan of chocolate and fruit either, except Terry's Chocolate Orange. It works for me because there's no fruit liqueur/syrup, like a chocolate-covered cherry. Instead, the orange flavor is infused into the chocolate. There's a similar Chocolate Raspberry that's also good.

    oh yes...I forgot about cherries/raspberries and chocolate - pretty yummy stuff! (I think I'm not the 'strawberry/chocolate' fan is because strawberries aren't a favorite fruit of mine)
  • raymax4raymax4 Member Posts: 6,058 Member Member Posts: 6,058 Member
    I think the reality is, most people don't really look at the nutritional info. At least, I know I didn't in decades past. When I first started looking at labels to track my grams of fat, protein and carbs, I was shocked to find that one of my favorite foods (Marie Callendar's Chicken Pot Pie) had 46 grams of fat, which was more than I was supposed to consume all day! Some people are a little more aware these days, but still, a lot of people just eat what they want -- hence the large percentage of the population that are suffering from obesity.

    I had that same experience with their pot pies. I use to love them
  • Noreenmarie1234Noreenmarie1234 Member Posts: 6,292 Member Member Posts: 6,292 Member
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    LOL

    Also these... I used to think they were sooo healthy because “‘no added sugar” and just fruit juice but 290 calories for a tiny container.
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    edited January 24
  • pancakerunnerpancakerunner Member, Premium Posts: 5,689 Member Member, Premium Posts: 5,689 Member
    Ugh, do not even get me started on the tragedy that is consumer nutrition education. :s
  • Cody0103Cody0103 Member Posts: 13 Member Member Posts: 13 Member
    Eating mushrooms is like eating slimey poop growths
  • PAPYRUS3PAPYRUS3 Member Posts: 8,859 Member Member Posts: 8,859 Member
    I'll take all the mushrooms you don't want, but if you like you can have all the battered/deep fried fast food onion rings...I can't even stand the smell of them either - 🤢
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