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80 calorie comparison pic

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  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 551Member Member Posts: 551Member Member
    psychod787 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    I’d choose the popcorn. I love popcorn!

    I just read that a guy ate a Big Mac every day for a month and lost 7 pounds. Just last month. He was eating 1500 calories a day, not just eating Big Macs
    5’4” he was posting on Instagram. Showing there are no bad foods. I think he was a personal trainer, or something like that.

    What the guy proved was that if one eats fewer calories then you burn you lose weight, nothing more. Ask any any Registered Dietitian if a 1500 calorie a day diet that includes a Big Mac every day is sustainable for health.

    Instagram posts giving nutrition or exercise advice from someone who people think "was a personal trainer or something like that", IMO is not a good idea.

    Big Mac, per McD web site:

    540 Calories
    28 grams Total Fat
    46 grams Carbs
    25 grams Protein

    If a person really wanted to, they could fit one in every day, and get overall decent (healthy) nutrition on 1500 calories, IMO.

    Not me, though: I'm vegetarian. ;)

    I'm thinking a registed dierition would not agree with your conclusion long term IMO.

    I'm thinking you have no idea what a registered dietitian would think on this topic.

    You might want to go back and carefully read my comments. I said I doubted a dietitian would think a Big Mac daily was healthy long term, especially on a 1500 calorie a day diet. Heck the trainer mentioned above that ate a Big Mac daily for a month and lost weight said the following:

    "I don't want anybody doing this challenge," he said. "I do not think that this challenge is healthy. I don't think it's smart but sometimes you have to do something extreme in order to make a simple point."

    Syatt merely wanted to hammer that point home.

    "The whole point of it was to show people that you can include your favorite foods into your diet in moderation and not only not lose progress, but actually continue to make progress, because so many people worry about ruining their entire diet if they go off track for one meal, whatever it is."


    I would agree with the trainer, and I believe most dietitians would say that a Big Mac is an "occasional" food and not an everyday food.

    If you can cite something where an actual nutrition professional says a Big Mac a day is fine long term for one's health, please post as I would be interested in reading it.

    You kind of remind me of a guy on here @OldAssDude

    So he likes facts/data and the recommendations of professionals also? Good man.

    Well, yes actually. Eat solid nutrition, avoid too much junk, and moderate exercise. With the occasional beer. Lol

    I'd get along well with him :)
  • psychod787psychod787 Posts: 2,707Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,707Member, Premium Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    Here is what I believe. If I went to an RD and said that I would eat close to 1000 calories a day of nutrient rich food as a trade-off for having a big mac it would get green lighted. The reason I believe this is because they are trained in nutrition and it would be unprofessional of them to have food prejudices. Once nutrition is met no one should really care how the calories for just energy are spent. Once your nutrition well is full most of the other nutrients you eat spill over into your urine. There is no super nutrition status and we are not elite athletes so we do not need ridiculously strict food protocols.

    I have met two different RDs. The first one because my doctor could not give me answers. The second because I wanted another pair of eyes on my plan to speed up my weight loss for 3 months to hit a surgery deadline. Both told me stories of how exhausting their job was to try and convince people to make any improvements at all. The second had a woman who wanted to lose weight but drank 800+ calories each day and she has tried to convince her to cut back or stop for MONTHS. Both loved the way I ate. Neither cared at all how much "junk" food I ate because I ate so much of what they called "quality" food.

    Well. I am not surprised they where not fighting the battle over some "junk". Just getting people to add "healthy" food in there diet must be exhausting. Now, there are some "healthy" foods that are easy to over eat on. Nuts and nut butters being an example. Though, if one is replacing that big mac meal they would have for lunch with a chicken breast salad with a light dressing, will most likely crowd out much of the "junk". When people do that, they are lowering the overall ED of their diet and as long as someone is not hyper compensating elsewhere, they will lose weight. Though it might be individual. Much like exercise does not cause weight loss. Well, it does in most people. There are some people over compensate, most don't.
  • psychod787psychod787 Posts: 2,707Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,707Member, Premium Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    Here is what I believe. If I went to an RD and said that I would eat close to 1000 calories a day of nutrient rich food as a trade-off for having a big mac it would get green lighted. The reason I believe this is because they are trained in nutrition and it would be unprofessional of them to have food prejudices. Once nutrition is met no one should really care how the calories for just energy are spent. Once your nutrition well is full most of the other nutrients you eat spill over into your urine. There is no super nutrition status and we are not elite athletes so we do not need ridiculously strict food protocols.

    I have met two different RDs. The first one because my doctor could not give me answers. The second because I wanted another pair of eyes on my plan to speed up my weight loss for 3 months to hit a surgery deadline. Both told me stories of how exhausting their job was to try and convince people to make any improvements at all. The second had a woman who wanted to lose weight but drank 800+ calories each day and she has tried to convince her to cut back or stop for MONTHS. Both loved the way I ate. Neither cared at all how much "junk" food I ate because I ate so much of what they called "quality" food.

    Well. I am not surprised they where not fighting the battle over some "junk". Just getting people to add "healthy" food in there diet must be exhausting. Now, there are some "healthy" foods that are easy to over eat on. Nuts and nut butters being an example. Though, if one is replacing that big mac meal they would have for lunch with a chicken breast salad with a light dressing, will most likely crowd out much of the "junk". When people do that, they are lowering the overall ED of their diet and as long as someone is not hyper compensating elsewhere, they will lose weight. Though it might be individual. Much like exercise does not cause weight loss. Well, it does in most people. There are some people over compensate, most don't.

    What Ann proposed was a scenario that you ate one big mac and the rest was nutrient dense food. If a person was eating too much calorie dense nutrient shallow food then the chicken breast and salad would certainly push calories in the right direction (assuming the calorie remained equal). If a person has already eaten a gigantic chicken salad that day as well as plenty of other "quality" food eating more chicken and salad could be redundant so why not have a big mac?

    Exactly. They are compensating. Much like a lady at my work who eats nuts by the handful because they are "healthy". "I have no idea why I am gaining weight?!? I eat nuts and they are healthy." While she eats her normal fare.
  • psychod787psychod787 Posts: 2,707Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,707Member, Premium Member
    As far as the rd not fighting. Some time you have to establish some healthy habits, then concentrate on the details.
  • runningjen74runningjen74 Posts: 316Member Member Posts: 316Member Member
    HollyPFlax wrote: »
    I only eat potato chips once a year now. When I go to Ireland, I make sure to get some Cheese and Onion Taytos. They are the best!hdzdsz86tq1a.jpeg

    Make a crisp sandwich with these, two slices of white bread + taytos
  • NovusDiesNovusDies Posts: 5,822Member, Premium Member Posts: 5,822Member, Premium Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    I’d choose the popcorn. I love popcorn!

    I just read that a guy ate a Big Mac every day for a month and lost 7 pounds. Just last month. He was eating 1500 calories a day, not just eating Big Macs
    5’4” he was posting on Instagram. Showing there are no bad foods. I think he was a personal trainer, or something like that.

    What the guy proved was that if one eats fewer calories then you burn you lose weight, nothing more. Ask any any Registered Dietitian if a 1500 calorie a day diet that includes a Big Mac every day is sustainable for health.

    Instagram posts giving nutrition or exercise advice from someone who people think "was a personal trainer or something like that", IMO is not a good idea.

    Big Mac, per McD web site:

    540 Calories
    28 grams Total Fat
    46 grams Carbs
    25 grams Protein

    If a person really wanted to, they could fit one in every day, and get overall decent (healthy) nutrition on 1500 calories, IMO.

    Not me, though: I'm vegetarian. ;)

    I'm thinking a registed dierition would not agree with your conclusion long term IMO.

    I'm thinking you have no idea what a registered dietitian would think on this topic.

    You might want to go back and carefully read my comments. I said I doubted a dietitian would think a Big Mac daily was healthy long term, especially on a 1500 calorie a day diet. Heck the trainer mentioned above that ate a Big Mac daily for a month and lost weight said the following:

    "I don't want anybody doing this challenge," he said. "I do not think that this challenge is healthy. I don't think it's smart but sometimes you have to do something extreme in order to make a simple point."

    Syatt merely wanted to hammer that point home.

    "The whole point of it was to show people that you can include your favorite foods into your diet in moderation and not only not lose progress, but actually continue to make progress, because so many people worry about ruining their entire diet if they go off track for one meal, whatever it is."


    I would agree with the trainer, and I believe most dietitians would say that a Big Mac is an "occasional" food and not an everyday food.

    If you can cite something where an actual nutrition professional says a Big Mac a day is fine long term for one's health, please post as I would be interested in reading it.

    Who said anything about a Big Mac per day? And, based on the macros, why would it not be in the context of an diet that had good balance overall? These kind of judgements don't really consider context and amount and, honestly come across as orthorexic.

    Please refer to the post by @AnnPT77 above which I responded to originally stating that IMO I do not believe for health reasons a dietitian would suggest that a diet that included a Big Mac a day would be healthy. As I stated above, and I believe would be in line with most dietitians, a Big Mac is an occasional type of food.

    Here is the post I responded to:

    Big Mac, per McD web site:

    540 Calories
    28 grams Total Fat
    46 grams Carbs
    25 grams Protein

    If a person really wanted to, they could fit one in every day, and get overall decent (healthy) nutrition on 1500 calories, IMO.

    Not me, though: I'm vegetarian


    I absolutely said that, and I own it.

    The point is: What matters is the whole way of eating, not one food or meal. The Big Mac is not the devil. It's basically meat and bread, plus some condiments and negligible veggies . . . normal foods, but nutritionally unbalanced on its own.

    If the rest of the person's day tops up protein, and includes a bunch of nice veggies and fruits, maybe some whole grains, MUFAs, PUFAs, they're good.

    Even as a vegetarian, I eat meals that have a similar macro profile to a Big Mac. I don't see why I should deprecate it even though (1) I wouldn't eat it unless under major duress, and (2) I think spending a third of calories on that makes the rest of the day unnecessarily more challenging. It wouldn't be my daily choice even if I ate meat. But it's food, with meaningful nutrients.

    It doesn't make sense to me to look at it in any other way. But I'm certainly not a dietitian, and don't pretend to be.

    I always consider my energy management to be my first priority for good health. If nothing else gets done in a day I need calories from any source possible. I will feel the affect of too little calories in hours in some cases. With the exception of electrolytes and fiber it could take substantially longer to realize the impact of a low nutrient level. In satisfying my energy requirement I want to eat enough of everything else to make a complete day for myself. I don't personally worry about occasionally incomplete days either. I have had vacation days where treat food has crowded out a lot of nutrition. I don't believe it makes any difference.

    I am nutritionally minded but I am not uptight about it. I believe being uptight about it is not helpful or mentally healthful (at least for me) as a practice.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Posts: 12,532Member Member Posts: 12,532Member Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    I’d choose the popcorn. I love popcorn!

    I just read that a guy ate a Big Mac every day for a month and lost 7 pounds. Just last month. He was eating 1500 calories a day, not just eating Big Macs
    5’4” he was posting on Instagram. Showing there are no bad foods. I think he was a personal trainer, or something like that.

    What the guy proved was that if one eats fewer calories then you burn you lose weight, nothing more. Ask any any Registered Dietitian if a 1500 calorie a day diet that includes a Big Mac every day is sustainable for health.

    Instagram posts giving nutrition or exercise advice from someone who people think "was a personal trainer or something like that", IMO is not a good idea.

    Big Mac, per McD web site:

    540 Calories
    28 grams Total Fat
    46 grams Carbs
    25 grams Protein

    If a person really wanted to, they could fit one in every day, and get overall decent (healthy) nutrition on 1500 calories, IMO.

    Not me, though: I'm vegetarian. ;)

    I'm thinking a registed dierition would not agree with your conclusion long term IMO.

    I'm thinking you have no idea what a registered dietitian would think on this topic.

    You might want to go back and carefully read my comments. I said I doubted a dietitian would think a Big Mac daily was healthy long term, especially on a 1500 calorie a day diet. Heck the trainer mentioned above that ate a Big Mac daily for a month and lost weight said the following:

    "I don't want anybody doing this challenge," he said. "I do not think that this challenge is healthy. I don't think it's smart but sometimes you have to do something extreme in order to make a simple point."

    Syatt merely wanted to hammer that point home.

    "The whole point of it was to show people that you can include your favorite foods into your diet in moderation and not only not lose progress, but actually continue to make progress, because so many people worry about ruining their entire diet if they go off track for one meal, whatever it is."


    I would agree with the trainer, and I believe most dietitians would say that a Big Mac is an "occasional" food and not an everyday food.

    If you can cite something where an actual nutrition professional says a Big Mac a day is fine long term for one's health, please post as I would be interested in reading it.

    Who said anything about a Big Mac per day? And, based on the macros, why would it not be in the context of an diet that had good balance overall? These kind of judgements don't really consider context and amount and, honestly come across as orthorexic.

    Please refer to the post by @AnnPT77 above which I responded to originally stating that IMO I do not believe for health reasons a dietitian would suggest that a diet that included a Big Mac a day would be healthy. As I stated above, and I believe would be in line with most dietitians, a Big Mac is an occasional type of food.

    Here is the post I responded to:

    Big Mac, per McD web site:

    540 Calories
    28 grams Total Fat
    46 grams Carbs
    25 grams Protein

    If a person really wanted to, they could fit one in every day, and get overall decent (healthy) nutrition on 1500 calories, IMO.

    Not me, though: I'm vegetarian


    I absolutely said that, and I own it.

    The point is: What matters is the whole way of eating, not one food or meal. The Big Mac is not the devil. It's basically meat and bread, plus some condiments and negligible veggies . . . normal foods, but nutritionally unbalanced on its own.

    If the rest of the person's day tops up protein, and includes a bunch of nice veggies and fruits, maybe some whole grains, MUFAs, PUFAs, they're good.

    Even as a vegetarian, I eat meals that have a similar macro profile to a Big Mac. I don't see why I should deprecate it even though (1) I wouldn't eat it unless under major duress, and (2) I think spending a third of calories on that makes the rest of the day unnecessarily more challenging. It wouldn't be my daily choice even if I ate meat. But it's food, with meaningful nutrients.

    It doesn't make sense to me to look at it in any other way. But I'm certainly not a dietitian, and don't pretend to be.

    I always consider my energy management to be my first priority for good health. If nothing else gets done in a day I need calories from any source possible. I will feel the affect of too little calories in hours in some cases. With the exception of electrolytes and fiber it could take substantially longer to realize the impact of a low nutrient level. In satisfying my energy requirement I want to eat enough of everything else to make a complete day for myself. I don't personally worry about occasionally incomplete days either. I have had vacation days where treat food has crowded out a lot of nutrition. I don't believe it makes any difference.

    I am nutritionally minded but I am not uptight about it. I believe being uptight about it is not helpful or mentally healthful (at least for me) as a practice.

    Agreed.

    But the point being disputed was the health implications of a Big Mac every day, not just sometimes. :)

  • JennikittenJennikitten Posts: 141Member Member Posts: 141Member Member
    I would feel more satisfied after the crisps as popcorn just makes me feel more hungry when I eat it
  • NovusDiesNovusDies Posts: 5,822Member, Premium Member Posts: 5,822Member, Premium Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    I’d choose the popcorn. I love popcorn!

    I just read that a guy ate a Big Mac every day for a month and lost 7 pounds. Just last month. He was eating 1500 calories a day, not just eating Big Macs
    5’4” he was posting on Instagram. Showing there are no bad foods. I think he was a personal trainer, or something like that.

    What the guy proved was that if one eats fewer calories then you burn you lose weight, nothing more. Ask any any Registered Dietitian if a 1500 calorie a day diet that includes a Big Mac every day is sustainable for health.

    Instagram posts giving nutrition or exercise advice from someone who people think "was a personal trainer or something like that", IMO is not a good idea.

    Big Mac, per McD web site:

    540 Calories
    28 grams Total Fat
    46 grams Carbs
    25 grams Protein

    If a person really wanted to, they could fit one in every day, and get overall decent (healthy) nutrition on 1500 calories, IMO.

    Not me, though: I'm vegetarian. ;)

    I'm thinking a registed dierition would not agree with your conclusion long term IMO.

    I'm thinking you have no idea what a registered dietitian would think on this topic.

    You might want to go back and carefully read my comments. I said I doubted a dietitian would think a Big Mac daily was healthy long term, especially on a 1500 calorie a day diet. Heck the trainer mentioned above that ate a Big Mac daily for a month and lost weight said the following:

    "I don't want anybody doing this challenge," he said. "I do not think that this challenge is healthy. I don't think it's smart but sometimes you have to do something extreme in order to make a simple point."

    Syatt merely wanted to hammer that point home.

    "The whole point of it was to show people that you can include your favorite foods into your diet in moderation and not only not lose progress, but actually continue to make progress, because so many people worry about ruining their entire diet if they go off track for one meal, whatever it is."


    I would agree with the trainer, and I believe most dietitians would say that a Big Mac is an "occasional" food and not an everyday food.

    If you can cite something where an actual nutrition professional says a Big Mac a day is fine long term for one's health, please post as I would be interested in reading it.

    Who said anything about a Big Mac per day? And, based on the macros, why would it not be in the context of an diet that had good balance overall? These kind of judgements don't really consider context and amount and, honestly come across as orthorexic.

    Please refer to the post by @AnnPT77 above which I responded to originally stating that IMO I do not believe for health reasons a dietitian would suggest that a diet that included a Big Mac a day would be healthy. As I stated above, and I believe would be in line with most dietitians, a Big Mac is an occasional type of food.

    Here is the post I responded to:

    Big Mac, per McD web site:

    540 Calories
    28 grams Total Fat
    46 grams Carbs
    25 grams Protein

    If a person really wanted to, they could fit one in every day, and get overall decent (healthy) nutrition on 1500 calories, IMO.

    Not me, though: I'm vegetarian


    I absolutely said that, and I own it.

    The point is: What matters is the whole way of eating, not one food or meal. The Big Mac is not the devil. It's basically meat and bread, plus some condiments and negligible veggies . . . normal foods, but nutritionally unbalanced on its own.

    If the rest of the person's day tops up protein, and includes a bunch of nice veggies and fruits, maybe some whole grains, MUFAs, PUFAs, they're good.

    Even as a vegetarian, I eat meals that have a similar macro profile to a Big Mac. I don't see why I should deprecate it even though (1) I wouldn't eat it unless under major duress, and (2) I think spending a third of calories on that makes the rest of the day unnecessarily more challenging. It wouldn't be my daily choice even if I ate meat. But it's food, with meaningful nutrients.

    It doesn't make sense to me to look at it in any other way. But I'm certainly not a dietitian, and don't pretend to be.

    I always consider my energy management to be my first priority for good health. If nothing else gets done in a day I need calories from any source possible. I will feel the affect of too little calories in hours in some cases. With the exception of electrolytes and fiber it could take substantially longer to realize the impact of a low nutrient level. In satisfying my energy requirement I want to eat enough of everything else to make a complete day for myself. I don't personally worry about occasionally incomplete days either. I have had vacation days where treat food has crowded out a lot of nutrition. I don't believe it makes any difference.

    I am nutritionally minded but I am not uptight about it. I believe being uptight about it is not helpful or mentally healthful (at least for me) as a practice.

    Agreed.

    But the point being disputed was the health implications of a Big Mac every day, not just sometimes. :)

    I meant that sometimes it doesn't even matter if I fill my entire day with big macs. I think I already addressed how they can be eaten each day in a healthy fashion upthread. I don't like them that much myself to engage in either scenario so I won't be trying it. The closest I have come is the week in March where I ate pizza or fast food everyday to fill most of my calorie void during a really bad family time. Lower volume calorie dense food helped because I had no desire to eat.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 551Member Member Posts: 551Member Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    I’d choose the popcorn. I love popcorn!

    I just read that a guy ate a Big Mac every day for a month and lost 7 pounds. Just last month. He was eating 1500 calories a day, not just eating Big Macs
    5’4” he was posting on Instagram. Showing there are no bad foods. I think he was a personal trainer, or something like that.

    What the guy proved was that if one eats fewer calories then you burn you lose weight, nothing more. Ask any any Registered Dietitian if a 1500 calorie a day diet that includes a Big Mac every day is sustainable for health.

    Instagram posts giving nutrition or exercise advice from someone who people think "was a personal trainer or something like that", IMO is not a good idea.

    Big Mac, per McD web site:

    540 Calories
    28 grams Total Fat
    46 grams Carbs
    25 grams Protein

    If a person really wanted to, they could fit one in every day, and get overall decent (healthy) nutrition on 1500 calories, IMO.

    Not me, though: I'm vegetarian. ;)

    I'm thinking a registed dierition would not agree with your conclusion long term IMO.

    I'm thinking you have no idea what a registered dietitian would think on this topic.

    You might want to go back and carefully read my comments. I said I doubted a dietitian would think a Big Mac daily was healthy long term, especially on a 1500 calorie a day diet. Heck the trainer mentioned above that ate a Big Mac daily for a month and lost weight said the following:

    "I don't want anybody doing this challenge," he said. "I do not think that this challenge is healthy. I don't think it's smart but sometimes you have to do something extreme in order to make a simple point."

    Syatt merely wanted to hammer that point home.

    "The whole point of it was to show people that you can include your favorite foods into your diet in moderation and not only not lose progress, but actually continue to make progress, because so many people worry about ruining their entire diet if they go off track for one meal, whatever it is."


    I would agree with the trainer, and I believe most dietitians would say that a Big Mac is an "occasional" food and not an everyday food.

    If you can cite something where an actual nutrition professional says a Big Mac a day is fine long term for one's health, please post as I would be interested in reading it.

    Who said anything about a Big Mac per day? And, based on the macros, why would it not be in the context of an diet that had good balance overall? These kind of judgements don't really consider context and amount and, honestly come across as orthorexic.

    Please refer to the post by @AnnPT77 above which I responded to originally stating that IMO I do not believe for health reasons a dietitian would suggest that a diet that included a Big Mac a day would be healthy. As I stated above, and I believe would be in line with most dietitians, a Big Mac is an occasional type of food.

    Here is the post I responded to:

    Big Mac, per McD web site:

    540 Calories
    28 grams Total Fat
    46 grams Carbs
    25 grams Protein

    If a person really wanted to, they could fit one in every day, and get overall decent (healthy) nutrition on 1500 calories, IMO.

    Not me, though: I'm vegetarian


    I absolutely said that, and I own it.

    The point is: What matters is the whole way of eating, not one food or meal. The Big Mac is not the devil. It's basically meat and bread, plus some condiments and negligible veggies . . . normal foods, but nutritionally unbalanced on its own.

    If the rest of the person's day tops up protein, and includes a bunch of nice veggies and fruits, maybe some whole grains, MUFAs, PUFAs, they're good.

    Even as a vegetarian, I eat meals that have a similar macro profile to a Big Mac. I don't see why I should deprecate it even though (1) I wouldn't eat it unless under major duress, and (2) I think spending a third of calories on that makes the rest of the day unnecessarily more challenging. It wouldn't be my daily choice even if I ate meat. But it's food, with meaningful nutrients.

    It doesn't make sense to me to look at it in any other way. But I'm certainly not a dietitian, and don't pretend to be.

    Thanks for coming back. I agree what matters is a whole day of eating. Can someone on a 1500 calorie a day diet get adequate nutrition with a daily Big Mac? I would say they probably could, but the remainder of their day would have to so on point with nutrient dense food they would be like a white rhino, out there but very rare.

    I like the guideline of many dietitians and people with PhD in nutrition behind their names, get 80-90% of your daily calories from nutrient dense foods (over time can have a total "off' day occasionally) and the other 10-20% whatever. Now if someone iss a special snowflake who requires a lot of calories due to activity level, they could probably sneak down a bit on the 80% nutrient dense food. A Big Mac daily on a 1500 calorie a day diet would be between 35-40% of one's daily calories.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 551Member Member Posts: 551Member Member
    mmapags wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    I’d choose the popcorn. I love popcorn!

    I just read that a guy ate a Big Mac every day for a month and lost 7 pounds. Just last month. He was eating 1500 calories a day, not just eating Big Macs
    5’4” he was posting on Instagram. Showing there are no bad foods. I think he was a personal trainer, or something like that.

    What the guy proved was that if one eats fewer calories then you burn you lose weight, nothing more. Ask any any Registered Dietitian if a 1500 calorie a day diet that includes a Big Mac every day is sustainable for health.

    Instagram posts giving nutrition or exercise advice from someone who people think "was a personal trainer or something like that", IMO is not a good idea.

    Big Mac, per McD web site:

    540 Calories
    28 grams Total Fat
    46 grams Carbs
    25 grams Protein

    If a person really wanted to, they could fit one in every day, and get overall decent (healthy) nutrition on 1500 calories, IMO.

    Not me, though: I'm vegetarian. ;)

    I'm thinking a registed dierition would not agree with your conclusion long term IMO.

    I'm thinking you have no idea what a registered dietitian would think on this topic.

    You might want to go back and carefully read my comments. I said I doubted a dietitian would think a Big Mac daily was healthy long term, especially on a 1500 calorie a day diet. Heck the trainer mentioned above that ate a Big Mac daily for a month and lost weight said the following:

    "I don't want anybody doing this challenge," he said. "I do not think that this challenge is healthy. I don't think it's smart but sometimes you have to do something extreme in order to make a simple point."

    Syatt merely wanted to hammer that point home.

    "The whole point of it was to show people that you can include your favorite foods into your diet in moderation and not only not lose progress, but actually continue to make progress, because so many people worry about ruining their entire diet if they go off track for one meal, whatever it is."


    I would agree with the trainer, and I believe most dietitians would say that a Big Mac is an "occasional" food and not an everyday food.

    If you can cite something where an actual nutrition professional says a Big Mac a day is fine long term for one's health, please post as I would be interested in reading it.

    Who said anything about a Big Mac per day? And, based on the macros, why would it not be in the context of an diet that had good balance overall? These kind of judgements don't really consider context and amount and, honestly come across as orthorexic.

    Please refer to the post by @AnnPT77 above which I responded to originally stating that IMO I do not believe for health reasons a dietitian would suggest that a diet that included a Big Mac a day would be healthy. As I stated above, and I believe would be in line with most dietitians, a Big Mac is an occasional type of food.

    Here is the post I responded to:

    Big Mac, per McD web site:

    540 Calories
    28 grams Total Fat
    46 grams Carbs
    25 grams Protein

    If a person really wanted to, they could fit one in every day, and get overall decent (healthy) nutrition on 1500 calories, IMO.

    Not me, though: I'm vegetarian


    And as you've been asked yet haven't answered, why do you believe most dieticians would agree with your position? Do you have any proof source for this claim other than the trainer you quoted? Something like the recommendations of a professional society of registered dieticians. BTW, there are even registered dieticians who believe woo. We've seen some post here. If it's just your opinion, good for you. Don't eat them.

    Google fast food and health to see why a daily Big Mac (especially on a low calorie diet isn't a good idea) Sample article numerous links:

    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324847.php

    I haven't had a Big Mac in years, IMO totally devoid of any taste except the sauce and pickles. We are fortunate to have Culvers in our area, give me a double Butterburger all day, you can actually eat it with just the meat, cheese and bread and it's fantastic. My go to when looking for an occasional fast food burger

    45tnt5o7mgdr.png

  • mmapagsmmapags Posts: 8,232Member Member Posts: 8,232Member Member
    Video of a guy who ate a Big Mac everyday for 30 days and still lost 7 lbs.

  • mmapagsmmapags Posts: 8,232Member Member Posts: 8,232Member Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    I’d choose the popcorn. I love popcorn!

    I just read that a guy ate a Big Mac every day for a month and lost 7 pounds. Just last month. He was eating 1500 calories a day, not just eating Big Macs
    5’4” he was posting on Instagram. Showing there are no bad foods. I think he was a personal trainer, or something like that.

    What the guy proved was that if one eats fewer calories then you burn you lose weight, nothing more. Ask any any Registered Dietitian if a 1500 calorie a day diet that includes a Big Mac every day is sustainable for health.

    Instagram posts giving nutrition or exercise advice from someone who people think "was a personal trainer or something like that", IMO is not a good idea.

    Big Mac, per McD web site:

    540 Calories
    28 grams Total Fat
    46 grams Carbs
    25 grams Protein

    If a person really wanted to, they could fit one in every day, and get overall decent (healthy) nutrition on 1500 calories, IMO.

    Not me, though: I'm vegetarian. ;)

    I'm thinking a registed dierition would not agree with your conclusion long term IMO.

    I'm thinking you have no idea what a registered dietitian would think on this topic.

    You might want to go back and carefully read my comments. I said I doubted a dietitian would think a Big Mac daily was healthy long term, especially on a 1500 calorie a day diet. Heck the trainer mentioned above that ate a Big Mac daily for a month and lost weight said the following:

    "I don't want anybody doing this challenge," he said. "I do not think that this challenge is healthy. I don't think it's smart but sometimes you have to do something extreme in order to make a simple point."

    Syatt merely wanted to hammer that point home.

    "The whole point of it was to show people that you can include your favorite foods into your diet in moderation and not only not lose progress, but actually continue to make progress, because so many people worry about ruining their entire diet if they go off track for one meal, whatever it is."


    I would agree with the trainer, and I believe most dietitians would say that a Big Mac is an "occasional" food and not an everyday food.

    If you can cite something where an actual nutrition professional says a Big Mac a day is fine long term for one's health, please post as I would be interested in reading it.

    Who said anything about a Big Mac per day? And, based on the macros, why would it not be in the context of an diet that had good balance overall? These kind of judgements don't really consider context and amount and, honestly come across as orthorexic.

    Please refer to the post by @AnnPT77 above which I responded to originally stating that IMO I do not believe for health reasons a dietitian would suggest that a diet that included a Big Mac a day would be healthy. As I stated above, and I believe would be in line with most dietitians, a Big Mac is an occasional type of food.

    Here is the post I responded to:

    Big Mac, per McD web site:

    540 Calories
    28 grams Total Fat
    46 grams Carbs
    25 grams Protein

    If a person really wanted to, they could fit one in every day, and get overall decent (healthy) nutrition on 1500 calories, IMO.

    Not me, though: I'm vegetarian


    And as you've been asked yet haven't answered, why do you believe most dieticians would agree with your position? Do you have any proof source for this claim other than the trainer you quoted? Something like the recommendations of a professional society of registered dieticians. BTW, there are even registered dieticians who believe woo. We've seen some post here. If it's just your opinion, good for you. Don't eat them.

    Google fast food and health to see why a daily Big Mac (especially on a low calorie diet isn't a good idea) Sample article numerous links:

    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324847.php

    I haven't had a Big Mac in years, IMO totally devoid of any taste except the sauce and pickles. We are fortunate to have Culvers in our area, give me a double Butterburger all day, you can actually eat it with just the meat, cheese and bread and it's fantastic. My go to when looking for an occasional fast food burger

    45tnt5o7mgdr.png

    Your link gives a gateway time out and doesn't open.
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