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Is promoting weight loss dangerous?

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  • psychod787psychod787 Posts: 2,829Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,829Member, Premium Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I wonder if anyone who wants to take cues from human evolution would be so quick to do so if they had to survive somewhere harsh without clothing or tools.

    People who forget the past, are bound to repeat it.... looking back can help us look to the future. While we can not live like cave people. We can look at hunter gather groups and see how they live and take certain things and implement them.

    I did not follow any of this. I definitely do not see how the "People who forget the past" line has anything to do with anthropological studies. I have always understood that it was talking about lessons we should learn as a society about social injustices and diplomatic disasters.

    I think the lessons we need to learn do not need a wayback machine that goes that far back. Pre-industrial is much more recent and much better documented. Plenty of things to learn there.

    Well... let's not make the same mistakes that led to our current issues. Thus eating to many calories and not moving. While weight had been on the rise since the turn of the 1900's, it really took off in the 70's and 80's. Corresponding with the rise of more sedentary jobs and lifestyle and increased intakes of well... foods that we ate too much of. If we look back in history, does not even have to be thousands of years ago, eat more whole foods and move a bit more. That's all... shoulders of giants stuff...

    Actually when it comes to obesity we are making the history that someone else should hopefully learn from now. This era is the cautionary tale. I believe the important lesson for future generations is that solving obesity is prevention.

    Exactly, but the "cure" we develop today is the prevention of tomorrow. I dont want to play Nero....

    The cure for the next generation is education. Require juniors in high school to take a health class on how to properly manage their weight. Warn them that if their life changes from an active to less active stage they need to eat less. People like me could give guest lectures about how much obesity once robbed me of my freedom.

    The cure for this generation is still education but cutting through all the noise is very difficult.

    While I agree that education IS important. The USDA tried to educated people years ago and how did they respond?
  • psychod787psychod787 Posts: 2,829Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,829Member, Premium Member
    Consider this:
    -The human body has evolved to favor weight gain in order to avoid starvation.
    -Calorie deprivation experiments have shown that even fairly small reductions in food intake can cause psychological distress, including hoarding behaviors.
    -Eating disorders are the deadliest of all mental illnesses due to high rates of suicide and permanent damage to internal organs.
    -Not eating enough stressed the body, which weakens the immune system and damages the cardiovascular system.
    -Almost no one who loses weight keeps it off long-term.
    -Being “overweight” after a certain age is protective against early death.

    In light of the above, is it actually responsible to promote weight loss? Or would it be more responsible to encourage people to eat a balanced diet and exercise without looking at the scale?


    Everyone who breathes dies. Therefore, I submit that everyone should stop breathing.

    🤢
  • NovusDiesNovusDies Posts: 5,995Member, Premium Member Posts: 5,995Member, Premium Member
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I wonder if anyone who wants to take cues from human evolution would be so quick to do so if they had to survive somewhere harsh without clothing or tools.

    People who forget the past, are bound to repeat it.... looking back can help us look to the future. While we can not live like cave people. We can look at hunter gather groups and see how they live and take certain things and implement them.

    I did not follow any of this. I definitely do not see how the "People who forget the past" line has anything to do with anthropological studies. I have always understood that it was talking about lessons we should learn as a society about social injustices and diplomatic disasters.

    I think the lessons we need to learn do not need a wayback machine that goes that far back. Pre-industrial is much more recent and much better documented. Plenty of things to learn there.

    Well... let's not make the same mistakes that led to our current issues. Thus eating to many calories and not moving. While weight had been on the rise since the turn of the 1900's, it really took off in the 70's and 80's. Corresponding with the rise of more sedentary jobs and lifestyle and increased intakes of well... foods that we ate too much of. If we look back in history, does not even have to be thousands of years ago, eat more whole foods and move a bit more. That's all... shoulders of giants stuff...

    Actually when it comes to obesity we are making the history that someone else should hopefully learn from now. This era is the cautionary tale. I believe the important lesson for future generations is that solving obesity is prevention.

    Exactly, but the "cure" we develop today is the prevention of tomorrow. I dont want to play Nero....

    The cure for the next generation is education. Require juniors in high school to take a health class on how to properly manage their weight. Warn them that if their life changes from an active to less active stage they need to eat less. People like me could give guest lectures about how much obesity once robbed me of my freedom.

    The cure for this generation is still education but cutting through all the noise is very difficult.

    While I agree that education IS important. The USDA tried to educated people years ago and how did they respond?

    I don't recall anyone ever teaching me anything other than food groups for balanced nutrition. I would have loved if someone explained how to interpret the scale and how to calculate the correct amount of food to eat. If a former big person had told me to get on the friggun scale once a week no matter what and take action immediately if it is consistently 10 pounds high it might have stuck with me. It might have also been nice to know that my genetics were not really holding me back and that set points were not a real thing.

    What other answer could there be? Should we take away food freedom and force everyone to exercise each day?
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Posts: 12,798Member Member Posts: 12,798Member Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I wonder if anyone who wants to take cues from human evolution would be so quick to do so if they had to survive somewhere harsh without clothing or tools.

    People who forget the past, are bound to repeat it.... looking back can help us look to the future. While we can not live like cave people. We can look at hunter gather groups and see how they live and take certain things and implement them.

    I did not follow any of this. I definitely do not see how the "People who forget the past" line has anything to do with anthropological studies. I have always understood that it was talking about lessons we should learn as a society about social injustices and diplomatic disasters.

    I think the lessons we need to learn do not need a wayback machine that goes that far back. Pre-industrial is much more recent and much better documented. Plenty of things to learn there.

    Well... let's not make the same mistakes that led to our current issues. Thus eating to many calories and not moving. While weight had been on the rise since the turn of the 1900's, it really took off in the 70's and 80's. Corresponding with the rise of more sedentary jobs and lifestyle and increased intakes of well... foods that we ate too much of. If we look back in history, does not even have to be thousands of years ago, eat more whole foods and move a bit more. That's all... shoulders of giants stuff...

    Actually when it comes to obesity we are making the history that someone else should hopefully learn from now. This era is the cautionary tale. I believe the important lesson for future generations is that solving obesity is prevention.

    Exactly, but the "cure" we develop today is the prevention of tomorrow. I dont want to play Nero....

    The cure for the next generation is education. Require juniors in high school to take a health class on how to properly manage their weight. Warn them that if their life changes from an active to less active stage they need to eat less. People like me could give guest lectures about how much obesity once robbed me of my freedom.

    The cure for this generation is still education but cutting through all the noise is very difficult.

    While I agree that education IS important. The USDA tried to educated people years ago and how did they respond?

    I don't recall anyone ever teaching me anything other than food groups for balanced nutrition. I would have loved if someone explained how to interpret the scale and how to calculate the correct amount of food to eat. If a former big person had told me to get on the friggun scale once a week no matter what and take action immediately if it is consistently 10 pounds high it might have stuck with me. It might have also been nice to know that my genetics were not really holding me back and that set points were not a real thing.

    What other answer could there be? Should we take away food freedom and force everyone to exercise each day?

    They taught me that, and I went and got obese anyway.

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10625791/mainstream-eating-guidance-1960

    I think modeling (how family/peers behave) and cultural pressures are probably more influential than structured education, for most people . . . and those are hard to influence. People tend to behave in ways that seem "normal" to them. It's part of what keeps fat countries fat, corrupt countries corrupt, etc. I suspect that because of thousands of generations with roots in tribal/village life, we may be hard-wired to tend toward "normal". Popular things (books, music, foods, etc.) IMO are popular because they're popular, not because they're objectively best.
  • psychod787psychod787 Posts: 2,829Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,829Member, Premium Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I wonder if anyone who wants to take cues from human evolution would be so quick to do so if they had to survive somewhere harsh without clothing or tools.

    People who forget the past, are bound to repeat it.... looking back can help us look to the future. While we can not live like cave people. We can look at hunter gather groups and see how they live and take certain things and implement them.

    I did not follow any of this. I definitely do not see how the "People who forget the past" line has anything to do with anthropological studies. I have always understood that it was talking about lessons we should learn as a society about social injustices and diplomatic disasters.

    I think the lessons we need to learn do not need a wayback machine that goes that far back. Pre-industrial is much more recent and much better documented. Plenty of things to learn there.

    Well... let's not make the same mistakes that led to our current issues. Thus eating to many calories and not moving. While weight had been on the rise since the turn of the 1900's, it really took off in the 70's and 80's. Corresponding with the rise of more sedentary jobs and lifestyle and increased intakes of well... foods that we ate too much of. If we look back in history, does not even have to be thousands of years ago, eat more whole foods and move a bit more. That's all... shoulders of giants stuff...

    Actually when it comes to obesity we are making the history that someone else should hopefully learn from now. This era is the cautionary tale. I believe the important lesson for future generations is that solving obesity is prevention.

    Exactly, but the "cure" we develop today is the prevention of tomorrow. I dont want to play Nero....

    The cure for the next generation is education. Require juniors in high school to take a health class on how to properly manage their weight. Warn them that if their life changes from an active to less active stage they need to eat less. People like me could give guest lectures about how much obesity once robbed me of my freedom.

    The cure for this generation is still education but cutting through all the noise is very difficult.

    While I agree that education IS important. The USDA tried to educated people years ago and how did they respond?

    I don't recall anyone ever teaching me anything other than food groups for balanced nutrition. I would have loved if someone explained how to interpret the scale and how to calculate the correct amount of food to eat. If a former big person had told me to get on the friggun scale once a week no matter what and take action immediately if it is consistently 10 pounds high it might have stuck with me. It might have also been nice to know that my genetics were not really holding me back and that set points were not a real thing.

    What other answer could there be? Should we take away food freedom and force everyone to exercise each day?

    So, I guess I am younger than you because the food pyramid they gave us had how many servings to have a day. I personally feel it's a little wrong, but oh well. Yes, genetics do play a role in weight. Though, personal choice decides If you become obese or not. Some people are just more predisposed to it. Very rarely will I tell a person they are wrong, but you are about set points. I look at it as more of a settling range than a point. Too much research exist on the subject. The range myriad of things. Environment, diet, exercise, genetics, weight history. Not saying you cant get below it, you can, but there is a price to pay. This point is not a fixed one. It can change as you change, but there will come a point in your adventure that your body will fight back at certain weight/bf. Not discounting what you have done, but you are still on the losing part of your adventure. Weight loss maintenance is a another thing.
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Posts: 5,202Member Member Posts: 5,202Member Member
    I do not have a source - but no, they do mean being slightly overweight - or more specifically staying slightly overweight if you already are rather than trying to lose weight - deliberate trying, not losing weight through illness - can be better for some older people.

    having that little bit of reserve helps in bounce-back or cushion back from illness.

    As I said earlier we are talking about a small demographic - people over 70 who have BMI's of 26/27ish and have been that level for a long period of time may be better maintaining at that than trying to lose weight.

    Not younger people. Not older people in obese category.

    People 70+ who have BMI's slightly above range and have been that level for a long period of time.
  • healingnurtrerhealingnurtrer Posts: 166Member Member Posts: 166Member Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I wonder if anyone who wants to take cues from human evolution would be so quick to do so if they had to survive somewhere harsh without clothing or tools.

    People who forget the past, are bound to repeat it.... looking back can help us look to the future. While we can not live like cave people. We can look at hunter gather groups and see how they live and take certain things and implement them.

    I did not follow any of this. I definitely do not see how the "People who forget the past" line has anything to do with anthropological studies. I have always understood that it was talking about lessons we should learn as a society about social injustices and diplomatic disasters.

    I think the lessons we need to learn do not need a wayback machine that goes that far back. Pre-industrial is much more recent and much better documented. Plenty of things to learn there.

    Well... let's not make the same mistakes that led to our current issues. Thus eating to many calories and not moving. While weight had been on the rise since the turn of the 1900's, it really took off in the 70's and 80's. Corresponding with the rise of more sedentary jobs and lifestyle and increased intakes of well... foods that we ate too much of. If we look back in history, does not even have to be thousands of years ago, eat more whole foods and move a bit more. That's all... shoulders of giants stuff...

    Actually when it comes to obesity we are making the history that someone else should hopefully learn from now. This era is the cautionary tale. I believe the important lesson for future generations is that solving obesity is prevention.

    Exactly, but the "cure" we develop today is the prevention of tomorrow. I dont want to play Nero....

    The cure for the next generation is education. Require juniors in high school to take a health class on how to properly manage their weight. Warn them that if their life changes from an active to less active stage they need to eat less. People like me could give guest lectures about how much obesity once robbed me of my freedom.

    The cure for this generation is still education but cutting through all the noise is very difficult.

    While I agree that education IS important. The USDA tried to educated people years ago and how did they respond?

    I don't recall anyone ever teaching me anything other than food groups for balanced nutrition. I would have loved if someone explained how to interpret the scale and how to calculate the correct amount of food to eat. If a former big person had told me to get on the friggun scale once a week no matter what and take action immediately if it is consistently 10 pounds high it might have stuck with me. It might have also been nice to know that my genetics were not really holding me back and that set points were not a real thing.

    What other answer could there be? Should we take away food freedom and force everyone to exercise each day?

    I agree that education (with actually good information- evidence-based- "cutting through all the noise" as you said) is important. Other needs may depend on the person- mental health care was a big need for me. Even with good info, I couldn't do this weight loss thing without taking care of my mental health first.
  • healingnurtrerhealingnurtrer Posts: 166Member Member Posts: 166Member Member
    Consider this:
    -The human body has evolved to favor weight gain in order to avoid starvation.
    -Calorie deprivation experiments have shown that even fairly small reductions in food intake can cause psychological distress, including hoarding behaviors.
    -Eating disorders are the deadliest of all mental illnesses due to high rates of suicide and permanent damage to internal organs.
    -Not eating enough stressed the body, which weakens the immune system and damages the cardiovascular system.
    -Almost no one who loses weight keeps it off long-term.
    -Being “overweight” after a certain age is protective against early death.

    In light of the above, is it actually responsible to promote weight loss? Or would it be more responsible to encourage people to eat a balanced diet and exercise without looking at the scale?

    Better education/ information + mental health care could help prevent these issues. Slow, steady weight loss with maintenance breaks stopping at a healthy weight isn't an eating disorder, will cause less stress than crash diets, will be easier to maintain, will improve most people's health and fitness.
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 3,255Member Member Posts: 3,255Member Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I wonder if anyone who wants to take cues from human evolution would be so quick to do so if they had to survive somewhere harsh without clothing or tools.

    People who forget the past, are bound to repeat it.... looking back can help us look to the future. While we can not live like cave people. We can look at hunter gather groups and see how they live and take certain things and implement them.

    I did not follow any of this. I definitely do not see how the "People who forget the past" line has anything to do with anthropological studies. I have always understood that it was talking about lessons we should learn as a society about social injustices and diplomatic disasters.

    I think the lessons we need to learn do not need a wayback machine that goes that far back. Pre-industrial is much more recent and much better documented. Plenty of things to learn there.

    Well... let's not make the same mistakes that led to our current issues. Thus eating to many calories and not moving. While weight had been on the rise since the turn of the 1900's, it really took off in the 70's and 80's. Corresponding with the rise of more sedentary jobs and lifestyle and increased intakes of well... foods that we ate too much of. If we look back in history, does not even have to be thousands of years ago, eat more whole foods and move a bit more. That's all... shoulders of giants stuff...

    Actually when it comes to obesity we are making the history that someone else should hopefully learn from now. This era is the cautionary tale. I believe the important lesson for future generations is that solving obesity is prevention.

    Exactly, but the "cure" we develop today is the prevention of tomorrow. I dont want to play Nero....

    The cure for the next generation is education. Require juniors in high school to take a health class on how to properly manage their weight. Warn them that if their life changes from an active to less active stage they need to eat less. People like me could give guest lectures about how much obesity once robbed me of my freedom.

    The cure for this generation is still education but cutting through all the noise is very difficult.

    While I agree that education IS important. The USDA tried to educated people years ago and how did they respond?

    I don't recall anyone ever teaching me anything other than food groups for balanced nutrition. I would have loved if someone explained how to interpret the scale and how to calculate the correct amount of food to eat. If a former big person had told me to get on the friggun scale once a week no matter what and take action immediately if it is consistently 10 pounds high it might have stuck with me. It might have also been nice to know that my genetics were not really holding me back and that set points were not a real thing.

    What other answer could there be? Should we take away food freedom and force everyone to exercise each day?

    I agree that education (with actually good information- evidence-based- "cutting through all the noise" as you said) is important. Other needs may depend on the person- mental health care was a big need for me. Even with good info, I couldn't do this weight loss thing without taking care of my mental health first.

    I am in full agreement that there needs to be more resources available, in general, with regards to mental health care as well as more information about mental illnesses (including pointing people to low cost and/or free resources). That said, that's not going to stop people from becoming overweight or obese if their mental health isn't a factor in their weight (raises hand).
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 605Member Member Posts: 605Member Member
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I wonder if anyone who wants to take cues from human evolution would be so quick to do so if they had to survive somewhere harsh without clothing or tools.

    People who forget the past, are bound to repeat it.... looking back can help us look to the future. While we can not live like cave people. We can look at hunter gather groups and see how they live and take certain things and implement them.

    I did not follow any of this. I definitely do not see how the "People who forget the past" line has anything to do with anthropological studies. I have always understood that it was talking about lessons we should learn as a society about social injustices and diplomatic disasters.

    I think the lessons we need to learn do not need a wayback machine that goes that far back. Pre-industrial is much more recent and much better documented. Plenty of things to learn there.

    Well... let's not make the same mistakes that led to our current issues. Thus eating to many calories and not moving. While weight had been on the rise since the turn of the 1900's, it really took off in the 70's and 80's. Corresponding with the rise of more sedentary jobs and lifestyle and increased intakes of well... foods that we ate too much of. If we look back in history, does not even have to be thousands of years ago, eat more whole foods and move a bit more. That's all... shoulders of giants stuff...

    Actually when it comes to obesity we are making the history that someone else should hopefully learn from now. This era is the cautionary tale. I believe the important lesson for future generations is that solving obesity is prevention.

    Exactly, but the "cure" we develop today is the prevention of tomorrow. I dont want to play Nero....

    The cure for the next generation is education. Require juniors in high school to take a health class on how to properly manage their weight. Warn them that if their life changes from an active to less active stage they need to eat less. People like me could give guest lectures about how much obesity once robbed me of my freedom.

    The cure for this generation is still education but cutting through all the noise is very difficult.

    While I agree that education IS important. The USDA tried to educated people years ago and how did they respond?

    Yep, if everyone followed "My Plate" the incidence of obesity would be significantly lower IMO.

    Information is there. Old saying you can lead a horse to water, can't make him drink.
    edited November 9
  • psychod787psychod787 Posts: 2,829Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,829Member, Premium Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I wonder if anyone who wants to take cues from human evolution would be so quick to do so if they had to survive somewhere harsh without clothing or tools.

    People who forget the past, are bound to repeat it.... looking back can help us look to the future. While we can not live like cave people. We can look at hunter gather groups and see how they live and take certain things and implement them.

    I did not follow any of this. I definitely do not see how the "People who forget the past" line has anything to do with anthropological studies. I have always understood that it was talking about lessons we should learn as a society about social injustices and diplomatic disasters.

    I think the lessons we need to learn do not need a wayback machine that goes that far back. Pre-industrial is much more recent and much better documented. Plenty of things to learn there.

    Well... let's not make the same mistakes that led to our current issues. Thus eating to many calories and not moving. While weight had been on the rise since the turn of the 1900's, it really took off in the 70's and 80's. Corresponding with the rise of more sedentary jobs and lifestyle and increased intakes of well... foods that we ate too much of. If we look back in history, does not even have to be thousands of years ago, eat more whole foods and move a bit more. That's all... shoulders of giants stuff...

    Actually when it comes to obesity we are making the history that someone else should hopefully learn from now. This era is the cautionary tale. I believe the important lesson for future generations is that solving obesity is prevention.

    Exactly, but the "cure" we develop today is the prevention of tomorrow. I dont want to play Nero....

    The cure for the next generation is education. Require juniors in high school to take a health class on how to properly manage their weight. Warn them that if their life changes from an active to less active stage they need to eat less. People like me could give guest lectures about how much obesity once robbed me of my freedom.

    The cure for this generation is still education but cutting through all the noise is very difficult.

    While I agree that education IS important. The USDA tried to educated people years ago and how did they respond?

    Yep, if everyone followed "My Plate" the incidence of obesity would be significantly lower IMO.

    Information is there. Old saying you can lead a horse to water, can't make him drink.

    Dont forget about the MFP Koolaid....
  • healingnurtrerhealingnurtrer Posts: 166Member Member Posts: 166Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I wonder if anyone who wants to take cues from human evolution would be so quick to do so if they had to survive somewhere harsh without clothing or tools.

    People who forget the past, are bound to repeat it.... looking back can help us look to the future. While we can not live like cave people. We can look at hunter gather groups and see how they live and take certain things and implement them.

    I did not follow any of this. I definitely do not see how the "People who forget the past" line has anything to do with anthropological studies. I have always understood that it was talking about lessons we should learn as a society about social injustices and diplomatic disasters.

    I think the lessons we need to learn do not need a wayback machine that goes that far back. Pre-industrial is much more recent and much better documented. Plenty of things to learn there.

    Well... let's not make the same mistakes that led to our current issues. Thus eating to many calories and not moving. While weight had been on the rise since the turn of the 1900's, it really took off in the 70's and 80's. Corresponding with the rise of more sedentary jobs and lifestyle and increased intakes of well... foods that we ate too much of. If we look back in history, does not even have to be thousands of years ago, eat more whole foods and move a bit more. That's all... shoulders of giants stuff...

    Actually when it comes to obesity we are making the history that someone else should hopefully learn from now. This era is the cautionary tale. I believe the important lesson for future generations is that solving obesity is prevention.

    Exactly, but the "cure" we develop today is the prevention of tomorrow. I dont want to play Nero....

    The cure for the next generation is education. Require juniors in high school to take a health class on how to properly manage their weight. Warn them that if their life changes from an active to less active stage they need to eat less. People like me could give guest lectures about how much obesity once robbed me of my freedom.

    The cure for this generation is still education but cutting through all the noise is very difficult.

    While I agree that education IS important. The USDA tried to educated people years ago and how did they respond?

    I don't recall anyone ever teaching me anything other than food groups for balanced nutrition. I would have loved if someone explained how to interpret the scale and how to calculate the correct amount of food to eat. If a former big person had told me to get on the friggun scale once a week no matter what and take action immediately if it is consistently 10 pounds high it might have stuck with me. It might have also been nice to know that my genetics were not really holding me back and that set points were not a real thing.

    What other answer could there be? Should we take away food freedom and force everyone to exercise each day?

    I agree that education (with actually good information- evidence-based- "cutting through all the noise" as you said) is important. Other needs may depend on the person- mental health care was a big need for me. Even with good info, I couldn't do this weight loss thing without taking care of my mental health first.

    I am in full agreement that there needs to be more resources available, in general, with regards to mental health care as well as more information about mental illnesses (including pointing people to low cost and/or free resources). That said, that's not going to stop people from becoming overweight or obese if their mental health isn't a factor in their weight (raises hand).

    I did not mean to imply everyone who is overweight or obese needs mental health care- it was asked what other answer could there be (besides education) and one example I could think of was mental health care- just an example from my life. :smile:

    I feel like I had pretty good information available to me when I started gaining weight for the first time I realized my behavior was causing my weight gain, I knew what I needed to do but that knowledge wasn't "all" I needed. I needed more than education and lifestyle change, I needed counseling.
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