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Is promoting weight loss dangerous?

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  • psychod787psychod787 Member, Premium Posts: 3,751 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,751 Member
    Well @quiksylver296 some us are just really good master debaters! 😏
    edited November 2019
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Member Posts: 9,915 Member Member Posts: 9,915 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I wonder if anyone who wants to take cues from human evolution would be so quick to do so if they had to survive somewhere harsh without clothing or tools.

    People who forget the past, are bound to repeat it.... looking back can help us look to the future. While we can not live like cave people. We can look at hunter gather groups and see how they live and take certain things and implement them.

    I did not follow any of this. I definitely do not see how the "People who forget the past" line has anything to do with anthropological studies. I have always understood that it was talking about lessons we should learn as a society about social injustices and diplomatic disasters.

    I think the lessons we need to learn do not need a wayback machine that goes that far back. Pre-industrial is much more recent and much better documented. Plenty of things to learn there.

    Plus it's not like natural selection with respect to diet/movement stopped happening tens of thousands of years ago. You could make an argument that modern medicine has monkey-wrenched consequences a bit, but that's quite recent.

    It's been too long ago to remember what academic expertise the people were, but it was the right one (some anthropology subspecialty, probably), having a science-based discussion about the paleo diet. Not only did the modern "paleo diet" not align with what actually humans ate in that era, but the experts' contention was that humans had had way, way more than the necessary minimum time to adapt to grains, since the advent of farming. (Note: Not saying no one should do paleo, if it floats their boat, just that the theoretical justification is shaky.)

    Like it or not, our food systems are what they are now. We can adapt the systems to us by voting with our dollars for different choices, or adapt our behavior to them . . . by eating appropriate amounts of Lean Cuisine, protein powder, frozen veg and Fiber One bars, or something like that, I guess. :lol::lol::lol:

    Every word of this. In the context of this discussion and in a much broader sense too.
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 8,320 Member Member Posts: 8,320 Member
    psychod787 wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    -Eating disorders are the deadliest of all mental illnesses due to high rates of suicide and permanent damage to internal organs.
    Again source? You don't need to have an eating disorder to be suicidal.

    With regards to your wanting a source for the bit of the op's post that said, "Eating disorders are the deadliest of all mental illnesses due to high rates of suicide and permanent damage to internal organs.", this is actually very easy to back up:
    https://www.nimh.nih.gov/about/directors/thomas-insel/blog/2012/spotlight-on-eating-disorders.shtml

    It's one of the only things (if not the only thing) in the first post that can easily be backed up. And yes, of course you don't have to have an eating disorder to be suicidal. Being suicidal is a symptom found in a wide number of mental illnesses, but that doesn't mean that all mental illnesses have the same death rates or that the cause of death related to a mental illness is always suicide.

    I agree. I think clinical depression is far more dangerous. I just spent 8hrs in a class discussing clinical depression in the context of isolation....

    You say that as though the overlap between EDs and clinical depression is the null set, which does not at all appear to be the case.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3085695/
  • psychod787psychod787 Member, Premium Posts: 3,751 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,751 Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I wonder if anyone who wants to take cues from human evolution would be so quick to do so if they had to survive somewhere harsh without clothing or tools.

    People who forget the past, are bound to repeat it.... looking back can help us look to the future. While we can not live like cave people. We can look at hunter gather groups and see how they live and take certain things and implement them.

    I did not follow any of this. I definitely do not see how the "People who forget the past" line has anything to do with anthropological studies. I have always understood that it was talking about lessons we should learn as a society about social injustices and diplomatic disasters.

    I think the lessons we need to learn do not need a wayback machine that goes that far back. Pre-industrial is much more recent and much better documented. Plenty of things to learn there.

    Well... let's not make the same mistakes that led to our current issues. Thus eating to many calories and not moving. While weight had been on the rise since the turn of the 1900's, it really took off in the 70's and 80's. Corresponding with the rise of more sedentary jobs and lifestyle and increased intakes of well... foods that we ate too much of. If we look back in history, does not even have to be thousands of years ago, eat more whole foods and move a bit more. That's all... shoulders of giants stuff...
  • NovusDiesNovusDies Member, Premium Posts: 8,453 Member Member, Premium Posts: 8,453 Member
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I wonder if anyone who wants to take cues from human evolution would be so quick to do so if they had to survive somewhere harsh without clothing or tools.

    People who forget the past, are bound to repeat it.... looking back can help us look to the future. While we can not live like cave people. We can look at hunter gather groups and see how they live and take certain things and implement them.

    I did not follow any of this. I definitely do not see how the "People who forget the past" line has anything to do with anthropological studies. I have always understood that it was talking about lessons we should learn as a society about social injustices and diplomatic disasters.

    I think the lessons we need to learn do not need a wayback machine that goes that far back. Pre-industrial is much more recent and much better documented. Plenty of things to learn there.

    Well... let's not make the same mistakes that led to our current issues. Thus eating to many calories and not moving. While weight had been on the rise since the turn of the 1900's, it really took off in the 70's and 80's. Corresponding with the rise of more sedentary jobs and lifestyle and increased intakes of well... foods that we ate too much of. If we look back in history, does not even have to be thousands of years ago, eat more whole foods and move a bit more. That's all... shoulders of giants stuff...

    Actually when it comes to obesity we are making the history that someone else should hopefully learn from now. This era is the cautionary tale. I believe the important lesson for future generations is that solving obesity is prevention.
  • sammidelvecchiosammidelvecchio Member Posts: 791 Member Member Posts: 791 Member
    I currently live in WV - the obesity rate is ridiculous here! It makes me so sad to see so much of the population merely existing in this world, not living...

    so you're suggesting people who are obese are not living their lives? That's a really ignorant statement.

    No, not all... but so many that truly are at a point where they can’t function. I see it in my own family. So many people who say “I can’t” due to their physical limitations. I have family that have finally gotten to the stage in life where the could travel, like they have always wanted, but they can’t due to obesity. Someone on my husband’s side who spent the last few years of her life mostly bedridden - there were other factors, but her weight was just too much for the state her knees were in. She had been told for years she needed to lose weight. Her daughter is heading down the same path, but is taking some steps toward a healthier lifestyle.

    That makes a lot more sense than saying obese people are just existing. Thanks for the context.

  • psychod787psychod787 Member, Premium Posts: 3,751 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,751 Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I wonder if anyone who wants to take cues from human evolution would be so quick to do so if they had to survive somewhere harsh without clothing or tools.

    People who forget the past, are bound to repeat it.... looking back can help us look to the future. While we can not live like cave people. We can look at hunter gather groups and see how they live and take certain things and implement them.

    I did not follow any of this. I definitely do not see how the "People who forget the past" line has anything to do with anthropological studies. I have always understood that it was talking about lessons we should learn as a society about social injustices and diplomatic disasters.

    I think the lessons we need to learn do not need a wayback machine that goes that far back. Pre-industrial is much more recent and much better documented. Plenty of things to learn there.

    Well... let's not make the same mistakes that led to our current issues. Thus eating to many calories and not moving. While weight had been on the rise since the turn of the 1900's, it really took off in the 70's and 80's. Corresponding with the rise of more sedentary jobs and lifestyle and increased intakes of well... foods that we ate too much of. If we look back in history, does not even have to be thousands of years ago, eat more whole foods and move a bit more. That's all... shoulders of giants stuff...

    Actually when it comes to obesity we are making the history that someone else should hopefully learn from now. This era is the cautionary tale. I believe the important lesson for future generations is that solving obesity is prevention.

    Exactly, but the "cure" we develop today is the prevention of tomorrow. I dont want to play Nero....
  • NovusDiesNovusDies Member, Premium Posts: 8,453 Member Member, Premium Posts: 8,453 Member
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I wonder if anyone who wants to take cues from human evolution would be so quick to do so if they had to survive somewhere harsh without clothing or tools.

    People who forget the past, are bound to repeat it.... looking back can help us look to the future. While we can not live like cave people. We can look at hunter gather groups and see how they live and take certain things and implement them.

    I did not follow any of this. I definitely do not see how the "People who forget the past" line has anything to do with anthropological studies. I have always understood that it was talking about lessons we should learn as a society about social injustices and diplomatic disasters.

    I think the lessons we need to learn do not need a wayback machine that goes that far back. Pre-industrial is much more recent and much better documented. Plenty of things to learn there.

    Well... let's not make the same mistakes that led to our current issues. Thus eating to many calories and not moving. While weight had been on the rise since the turn of the 1900's, it really took off in the 70's and 80's. Corresponding with the rise of more sedentary jobs and lifestyle and increased intakes of well... foods that we ate too much of. If we look back in history, does not even have to be thousands of years ago, eat more whole foods and move a bit more. That's all... shoulders of giants stuff...

    Actually when it comes to obesity we are making the history that someone else should hopefully learn from now. This era is the cautionary tale. I believe the important lesson for future generations is that solving obesity is prevention.

    Exactly, but the "cure" we develop today is the prevention of tomorrow. I dont want to play Nero....

    The cure for the next generation is education. Require juniors in high school to take a health class on how to properly manage their weight. Warn them that if their life changes from an active to less active stage they need to eat less. People like me could give guest lectures about how much obesity once robbed me of my freedom.

    The cure for this generation is still education but cutting through all the noise is very difficult.
  • psychod787psychod787 Member, Premium Posts: 3,751 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,751 Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I wonder if anyone who wants to take cues from human evolution would be so quick to do so if they had to survive somewhere harsh without clothing or tools.

    People who forget the past, are bound to repeat it.... looking back can help us look to the future. While we can not live like cave people. We can look at hunter gather groups and see how they live and take certain things and implement them.

    I did not follow any of this. I definitely do not see how the "People who forget the past" line has anything to do with anthropological studies. I have always understood that it was talking about lessons we should learn as a society about social injustices and diplomatic disasters.

    I think the lessons we need to learn do not need a wayback machine that goes that far back. Pre-industrial is much more recent and much better documented. Plenty of things to learn there.

    Well... let's not make the same mistakes that led to our current issues. Thus eating to many calories and not moving. While weight had been on the rise since the turn of the 1900's, it really took off in the 70's and 80's. Corresponding with the rise of more sedentary jobs and lifestyle and increased intakes of well... foods that we ate too much of. If we look back in history, does not even have to be thousands of years ago, eat more whole foods and move a bit more. That's all... shoulders of giants stuff...

    Actually when it comes to obesity we are making the history that someone else should hopefully learn from now. This era is the cautionary tale. I believe the important lesson for future generations is that solving obesity is prevention.

    Exactly, but the "cure" we develop today is the prevention of tomorrow. I dont want to play Nero....

    The cure for the next generation is education. Require juniors in high school to take a health class on how to properly manage their weight. Warn them that if their life changes from an active to less active stage they need to eat less. People like me could give guest lectures about how much obesity once robbed me of my freedom.

    The cure for this generation is still education but cutting through all the noise is very difficult.

    While I agree that education IS important. The USDA tried to educated people years ago and how did they respond?
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